Doraemon: Robot War (partially found rare bootleg anime film; 1983)


Doraemon: Robot War
Doraemon as seen in the movie. Note the aforementioned English and Traditional Chinese subtitles.
Doraemon as seen in the movie. Note the aforementioned English and Traditional Chinese subtitles.
Status Partially Found

Doraemon: Robot War (小叮噹大戰機器人) is a 1983 bootleg Doraemon film created by Cuckoo's Nest Studio (now known as Wang Film Productions). The film was directed by Wang Ya Quan. The film was released in theaters on February 12, 1983, but it did poorly at the box office and was not released on home video.

Plot

The plot of the film centers around a Robotics Exhibition in Taiwan where they are voting for the world's best robot. One professor who is really committed to developing the world's best robot had his spotlight suddenly stolen from him when Doraemon and Nobita entered the competition. Having been accidentally coerced into the competition, Doraemon used a wide variety of gadgets to defeat his opponents and ended up winning the World's Most Excellent Robot award.

The professor is so frustrated by this that he begins to develop an evil robot to defeat Doraemon. Meanwhile, Doraemon became a household name overnight and is now a big star. Wanting to become a star and experience the spotlight as well, Nobita uses a gadget to disguise himself as Doraemon.

The result of this is that Nobita, disguised as Doraemon, ends up being abducted by the professor's evil robot. Once he learns of this, Doraemon immediately sets out to rescue Nobita. Meanwhile, the professor sends out an army of robots to carry out terrorist attacks all around the world.

Eventually, Doraemon saves Nobita and manages to learn the weakness of the professor's robots, a fear of a certain type of gemstone. With this knowledge, Nobita and his friends are able to set out on an adventure, find the gemstone, and save the world.

Wang Film Productions

Wang Film Productions is an overseas animation outlet, originally created by James Wang for Hannah Barbera. It has worked for, among lesser-known studios, Hannah-Barbera/Cartoon Network (Regular Show: The Movie, Jetsons: the Movie, numerous Scooby-Doo specials), and Disney (Tron, The 7D, Phineas and Ferb movies, Goof Troop), as well as 3 episodes of Ren and Stimpy and 30 episodes of Tiny Toon Adventures.

Unlike more amateurish companies such as Regal Studios or Wolf Tracer Studios, this is a "legitimate" production house that does legitimate animation work, which makes the fact that they made an unauthorized Doraemon film even stranger.

Availability

Information on the film is extremely scarce, and the only proof of its existence is the few Chinese sites, containing several screenshots and one clip of ending footage from the film which was posted on Facebook in 2012.

All footage of the film has English and Traditional Chinese subtitles - it is unknown why this was included in the release.

Lead No 1. Msun Chang

Msun (the person who wrote the blog which hosted the existing images and posted a 30-second clip on Facebook), hasn't uploaded anything else from the movie and refuses to do so is because people keep "stealing" his videos and uploading them to YouTube, in combination to an incident when he first uploaded it where he was the only one to receive a takedown, apparently by Doraemon`s original company, which means this may actually be official, or at least officially recognized as a Doraemon film.

Gallery

An 'Animation Warehouse' episode about the film.

References

Comments


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Markiegee50X

17 months ago
Score 0++
Cool lost media!!
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Achoo

17 months ago
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It is very cool - and extremely peculiar.
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Pandabluess

17 months ago
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Has Any Contact Msun or Wang Films If They Have The Film
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Anonymous user #1

17 months ago
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The clip is not only Chinese subtitled - I'm pretty sure it's a Chinese dub. I know basic Japanese, and I can't recognize and words from the clip.
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Anonymous user #2

17 months ago
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Yeah, it's Chinese.
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Anonymous user #3

17 months ago
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The subtitles are in traditional Chinese, not simplified Chinese.
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Anonymous user #4

17 months ago
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So the poster has the Ideon on it. I wonder if the aired product actually included any footage of it. I would say it was just added on because it looked cool, but there is currently no way of knowing
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Seki108

17 months ago
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(Same guy as Anon 4, but I finally decided to create an account)

Alternatively, it could have been advertising theaters running the second Ideon movie, although that movie premiered in June 1982. Thus the poster was probably not advertising that too.
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Anonymous user #5

15 months ago
Score 1++
If its so rare, why they know all the plot of the movie?
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Anonymous user #6

13 months ago
Score 0++
If it was only distributed to 13 cities, how did they get screenshots and a clip?
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VGDCMario

11 months ago
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They were all uploaded by the same guy, msun (or at least the runner of "msun's baseball videos.")
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PannenkoekenNL

11 months ago
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"I have read the full version, now only one person in Taiwan to hold video, he wants to preserve reluctant to upload."

"bilingual subtitles movie [is a] convention in Taiwan"

"According to the "United Daily News" reported on February 16, 1983, the box office as a result of rain and rain as expected, but the actual number is unknown, only according to "China Times" February 26, 1983 reported that less than NT $ 10 million."

http://tieba...9126401?pn=2
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Anonymous user #11

4 months ago
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Wait, so this guy has access to a movie that is extremely rare, not to mention pretty cool, and is reluctant to share it? Is he worried about the legal ramifications? My head hurts...
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Anonymous user #7

11 months ago
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This movie was released in 1983, not 1982.
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Anonymous user #8

10 months ago
Score 2++
Why chinese peoples always want to make ripoffs...
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Anonymous user #9

8 months ago
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A lot of films in Hong Kong at the time included English and Chinese subtitles, and their presence is most likely to accommodate that market.
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Bman78

1 months ago
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The movie was made in Taiwan, and yeah you're right, many programs from China, Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau like to use English subtitles under the Chinese ones.
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Anonymous user #10

7 months ago
Score 1++
That's Nobita's father, not Gian (Big G) where the tank image. - Carlos Manuel Villar.
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SADLAD84

4 months ago
Score 1++
You see anonymous user 11, this guy won't release the film because he realises it's rarer than a good piece of emoji merchandise, and knows that if he releases it, it's value will go down like your average prostitute. If you thought that last joke was too low brow, HAVE YOU SEEN THE NAME OF THE COMPANY THAT MADE THIS???????????. Anyone who saw the name Wang film productions and made even the slightest attempt at a joke in their head is more low brow than I could ever wish to be.
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Anonymous user #12

3 months ago
Score 2++
You know, for an unofficial animated bootleg, you'd almost be convinced that it was an official Doraemon movie and it looks like it had some effort put into it to make it look like the anime and manga (even with the limited animation).
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Anonymous user #13

25 days ago
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thats me on mondays
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