Dracula (Lost 1920 Russian Film; Existence Unconfirmed)


Dracula (1920)
The poster for the fake film.
The poster for the fake film.
Status Existence Unconfirmed

Dracula (1920) is an alleged Soviet movie version of Dracula. The existence of this film has not been confirmed, as no production stills, footage, or significant information about the film seems to have survived.[1]
If this film does exist, it would be the first film adaptation of Bram Stoker's 1897 novel, Dracula.
Some sources cite Victor Tourjansky as the director of the film, but most official data doesn't mention this movie in his filmography.
The "lost" status information about the film comes from The Vampire Book - The Encyclopedia Of The Undead by J. Gordon Melton.[2]

Reference to the film in The Vampire Book; screencap courtesy of Cinemassacre.
Russian news website Dimitrovgrad Panorama claims that the movie was found in Serbia, but due to no further developments that would confirm the credibility of the information, it seems likely to be a hoax.
[3]A short black-and-white movie surfaced, claiming to be this resurfaced 1920 film found in Serbia, but it is obvious from several elements that it is a recently-made film using several techniques to make it look old.[4]

A poster was created alongside this short film.

All the supposed visual evidence of it's existence has been proved fake as it was all fan made work, and all the info for the film points back to the reference in "The Vampire Book". The reference in the book is likely a mistake as the most likely case is that the author may have found info on "Drakula Halala" or "Dracula's Death" in english. but poorly translated from a foreign language (likely Russian) thus causing him the confusion that there is another "Dracula" film that came earlier. The only difference between this supposed film and "Dracula's Death" is that "Drakula" was made in Russia in 1920 while "Drakula's Halala" was made in Hungary in 1921. At this point no other evidence of it's existence has surfaced meaning that it is highly unlikely this is a real film but rather a misconception from the "Dracula's Death" film from 1921.

References

  1. Wikipedia page with a brief description of the film. Retrieved 17 Mar '16.
  2. Amazon page for the third edition of the book. Retrieved 17 Mar '16.
  3. http://dpanorama.ru/news/nemoe_kino/2014-10-29-7091
  4. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qk8imiYs_OQ

Comments


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Anonymous user #1

8 months ago
Score 0++

There's a very loose Hungarian adaptation of Dracula too.

But most scholars of Dracula/the Gothic start with the Todd Browning movie or the early Latino movie adaptation
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Reynard

5 months ago
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Yes, there's an article about this movie: http://lostm..._film;_1921)
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Feathernox

5 months ago
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There are some rumours about this film production: https://web....la_film_1920 And those: http://dpano...4-10-29-7091 They contradict each other: name of director mentioned in first link is other than in the second.

Unknown if it is fake or not, poster of this movie: http://i.img...mDXFECex.jpg
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Reynard

5 months ago
Score 0++
Say, that's an interesting lead!
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Anon

5 months ago
Score 1++

First of all the Poster translates to "Drakula, 5 Part Drama" Second of all there is also this video supposedly the actual movie though you can easily tell it's fake.

https://www....=Qk8imiYs_OQ The "Dracula" depicted in the video is nearly identical to the one in the poster so since the video is fake that means the poster is fake too. Just thought it would be worth mentioning. : )
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Reynard

5 months ago
Score 0++
Well, guess it is fake indeed. Maybe we can leave it as a fan creation...
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Kobochat

5 months ago
Score 0++
It's probably worth mentioning that The Vampire Book is NOT the only time this movie is mentioned, as the book itself pulled that info from a 1975 book called The Dracula Book, written by somebody else. I don't have the book in my hands, but according to Wikipedia, the quote from it that mentions this is: "Other film versions of Dracula are reported to have been made about this time — one being Russian — but there is no real verification to substantiate these claims."
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Kobochat

5 months ago
Score 0++
Obviously this doesn't make it any more conclusive, but I feel we should remove the speculation that its inclusion in The Vampire Book could be due to an error, since this has been rumored long before that book came out. The man did his research, he was just dealing with sketchy sources, and probably should have made that more clear.
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Kobochat

5 months ago
Score 0++
P.P.S. Not very of you to singlehandedly change the status to "Nonexistent" and "fake" based purely on your own personal opinion, and with no conclusive evidence.
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