El Apóstol (lost Argentinian first feature animated film; 1917)


El Apóstol
A fan-made poster for the film.
A fan-made poster for the film.
Status Lost

El Apóstol (aka The Apostle) was an Argentinian silent black-and-white animated film released in 1917.[1] It was directed, written, designed and animated by Quirino Cristiani, whose two other animated features are also lost (Sin Dejar rastros and Peludópolis).

It is considered to be the first animated feature (being 70 minutes long with a frame-rate of 14 images per second), but all known copies were destroyed in a fire in 1926.

Design

Instead of using traditional cellulose animation, Cristiani would use flat puppets with rotating/removable members. Character designs were made by Diógenes Taborda, a popular cartoonist at the time.

Premise

The film was a political satire about then-Argentinian-president Hipolito Yrigoyen, wanting to cleanse Bueno Aires of immorality and corruption. Yrigoyen flies into heaven and encounters the god of thunder, Jupiter. Using his lightning bolts, Yrigoyen strikes Bueno Aires, and the city is engulfed in flames, burning into ashes, before he decides to start rebuilding the city. He then awakens, finding out that this was all a dream and is forced to face the harsh reality of complicated politics.

Legacy

No stills or posters of the film remain, apart from a few character designs by Taborda and a photograph of the Buenos Aires model, as seen below.

Cristiani would later make another political satire animated feature about Yrigoyen: Peludopolis.

Gallery

References

  1. Page about Quirino Cristiani (also source of pictures) Retrieved 18 Mar '16.

Comments


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CryClown

9 months ago
Score 0++
a work of art, wish i could see it
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Dash Master 48

8 months ago
Score 0++
We don't know if a copy lives.
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Anonymous user #3

2 months ago
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Umm, i don't wanna to creste hype but, my *bisabuelo en inglés* buy a copy from Quirino, en fin hablaré normal, se la compró y creo que está en la bodega de su vieja casa donde también vivió mi abuelo, y murió tambien xd, lo sé porque mi abuelo me contó que él la fue a ver de pequeño con su papá, y que salió en todos los diarios (el de acá se llamaba La GaZeta creo) de que se había incendiado el estudio o fábrica o bla bla no recuerdo bien, pero que fue algo chocante para mis nonos en fin, obviamente si busco la película no estará como "EL APOSTOL" estará en un formato viejíiiisimo y me será difícil identificarlo. Oh y una cosa mas, mi bisabue pudo comprar una copia porque ps era un fucking millonario, era inventor y escultor (lástima que las esculturas las robó un tal no se qué "iramain" y la puso con su nombre, ay, injusticias, y mi bisabuelo inventó el... el... bueno, algo de un auto viejo que ahora obviamente ya no se usa, AMORTIGUADOR así se llamaba claro que tonto ps, bueno eso, antes de que esa casa se venda y la demuelan podría ir con mi familia a tratar de ir a buscarla, paz gente

(Toda la información aquí es real, si me piden pruebas se las daré)
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Casualbrowser

8 months ago
Score 2++
It is so disgusting that this is gone forever. This is death. People will call canceled project dead, but this is more like real death. It's just gone forever. I think it's just as sad as an actual death. All that work is gone. There's no fairness to anything. Stuff like this shouldn't just dissapear.
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Anonymous user #1

8 months ago
Score 0++
Well said.
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Casualbrowser

7 months ago
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Thank you. (:
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Anonymous user #2

7 months ago
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That's one the most profound and amazing thing said on an internet forum in years.
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Casualbrowser

7 months ago
Score 1++
Why does Disney have to lie and say they made the first feature animated film? They aren't some tiny struggling studio trying to get recognition. They don't have any reason to want to make up lies for publicity like that. They're culturally influential enough! Why not just be truthful then? It's not like they don't have anything they really did to be proud of. People should know the truth. If people knew about this film, they'd learn a lot. This is tremendously historically significant. And it shows us how even the most culturally significant things can go away forever, so we should value art and archive everything. It's a tragedy that this is gone, but it still deserves recognition. I'm absolutely sure that animators at Disney have tremendous respect for the medium, so I wish the company as a whole would recognize other historical animation even if it isn't theirs. Unless I'm mistaken, didn't Walt Disney himself know about this film (or the artist's others, I don't remember) and see some of the work on it or the puppets used in it, and wasn't he very impressed by it? That just adds insult to injury.
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Anonymous user #2

7 months ago
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You are so right. The mainstream world of entertainment gets more credit than it really deserves. I mean plus 90% of video games, movies, and cartoons marketed by big companies are made by people who make stuff in their garage and basements with a budget of 25 dollars, and the only credit they get is there name in the very end of the film after people have left the theater or shut off the television. It's criminal that 3rd party studios like this almost NEVER get the money, fame, or praise that they deserve. Thank the lord for YouTube so things like this don't happen as often anymore.
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Dimadick

7 months ago
Score 1++

Disney created Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs (1937), which was the first American animated feature film. When Disney gets credit for supposedly creating the first animated feature, the ones getting ignored are a number of Argentinian, German, French, Soviet, and Italian films. This is more of a case of the United States ignoring the film traditions of other countries, than a Disney thing.

The Disney film is the one which created a market for animated feature films in the United States. It differed from its predecessors in using cel-animation, instead of cutout animation, silhouette animation, stop-motion animation, and puppet animation. The so-called "traditional animation" of Snow White was actually still innovative at the time.

As for Disney's animators, they are not running the company. Founder Walt Disney used to be an animator, but most of the Disney executives since his death are people who have never actually worked in the production of an animated film. For example, Donn Tatum was a lawyer and Ron W. Miller was a professional American football player.
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CartoonNetworkYesNickJrNo

1 months ago
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This year el apóstol turns 100 years old. Someone might have the only surviving copy, if of course any have survived
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Anonymous user #4

28 days ago
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Holaaa Soy el wachin de hace un tiempo Tengo la carátula del apóstol pero ni idea de cómo mostrarselo jsjsjs

Hay alguna galería "abierta" para hacerlo?
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