Here Comes Sophie (Lost 1979 Animated Movie; Existence Unconfirmed)


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Here Comes Sophie
American poster (very possibly fake).
American poster (very possibly fake).
Status Lost/Existence Unconfirmed
Here Comes Sophie ("Voici venir Sophie" in the original French) is a possibly 1979 Belgian animated movie based on the comic book series Sophie by Jidéhem. It would have been produced by the Belvision and the Dupuis studios, which adapted into animation many French-Belgian comics.


The movie seemed to have been released in Belgium, France, the United Kingdom and the United States of America. It has not resurfaced in any way since, and sources confirming its existence are arguable. The only visual evidence left are three English-language posters, one for an American release, one for a British release and the third claiming a release by Disney. However, it is possible that at least one of those posters is false/fan-created.

Original Comic

Cover of the first album of her series.
Sophie was then a fairly-popular comic published in the very popular magazine Spirou, which still runs to this day.


The titular Sophie Karamazout is a pigtailed mischievous little girl who is the daughter of a genius scientist. She gets into miscellaneous adventures, along with her friends. She is also assisted by a hovering egg-shaped vehicle and a sentient robot car called Zoé.
One of her friends is Starter, a car mechanic who was originally the protagonist of his own comic until side-character Sophie became more popular and thus got her own spin-off comic. Some of Starter's own stories got repackaged in this series, with modified pages to give Sophie more participation.

Sophie also seems to live in the same universe as the Smurfs - who were published in the same Spirou magazine and its characters often had cameos/crossovers- since a short story has her confront Gargamel's descendant who also plans on catching Smurfs.

Cast and production

"Disney" poster. The art comes from the back of comic albums.
Information on the movie's cast and production is hard to come by and even contradictory, if you take the posters at face value, even if you consider that they have a different cast according to the intended country release (plus a Disney-supported release):
  • René Goscinny and Lee Payant are credited as the directors on the Disney poster, while José Dutillieu is credited as such on the British poster. Goscinny directing is unlikely, considering he died in 1977.
  • Ray Goossens is credited as the producer on the British poster, while Raymond Leblanc is credited as such on the Disney poster.
  • All posters credit Gérard Calvi for the musical score. The American poster credits the lyrics to Michel Legrand.
  • Jidéhem is credited as the writer on the American poster, while Pierre Tchernia is credited as such on the Disney poster.
  • Sophie was originally voiced by Eva Ionesco: she is voiced by Molly Ringwald in the American version, Elizabeth Hurley in the British version (both actresses were very young at the time and barely began their film career) and Allison Balson is credited on the Disney poster.
    • The Disney poster also mentions the voice talents of Daws Butler, Hal Smith, Mark Baker and Sandy Duncan.
    • This Disney poster also specifies that the English version was written by Wolfgang Reitherman and Walter Lantz.
  • The Disney poster credits Richard Williams Studio for the animation, which is an oddity since Belvision cartoons usually handled their animation locally. However, around that time period (and well into the 1980s), the Richard Williams Studio did do some French-based animation such as a few food ads.

The movie is not mentioned in any of those people's fimography, which makes its existence doubtful.

About the movie

British poster.
The movie has not resurfaced to this day anywhere, even in French-speaking Europe, which should normally be its primary audience. This makes the only surviving posters being the English-language ones a bit ironic.


It is unknown why the film seems to have completely fallen into obscurity, not warranting a mention on any of the creators/actors's filmography (especially considering that Elizabeth Hurley didn't even have a screen appearance at the time).

Apart from it, there are not even screen caps of the movie to be found. The found posters only use art drawn in the original comic book style.

Animated?

Richard Harris in Gulliver's Travels; note the animated Lilliputians.
It isn't even certain if the movie is even a fully animated feature, or a mix of live-action and animation; one blog states that the movie is the latter, being produced along with Gulliver's Travels (1977) that was also animated by Belvision and had a live-action Richard Harris playing Gulliver among animated Lilliputian characters.


It is thus possible that Here Comes Sophie would use such an aesthetic. Although, if Sophie is animated, it is unknown which of the other characters and the environment, sets or proprs would be live-action or animated as well.

Aftermath

A few sources state that the movie has been put on DVD either by Citel Vidéo or Studio Canal, but it is now impossible to find.

Even then, the Sophie comic still remains quite obscure, and is a cult classic at best among old French-Belgian comic fans. It still got modern reprints, however, and an animated series adaptation could be in the works for a 2016 release. If this series comes into fruition, it is possible the 1979 movie would get a rerelease.

External links

Comments


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Anonymous user #1

8 months ago
Score 0++

1. This looks really cute, I'd love to see it found. 2. Is that Disney poster even real? The typeset in the speechbubble looks pretty unprofessional (it looks like it's aliased when the image is fullsize), not to mention the poor translation ("Will you have Fun!")

3. Where's the third poster mentioned in the article?
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Reynard

8 months ago
Score 0++

1. Thanks! You can find the original comic, it's quite cute too, although I don't think there is an English translation. You can search with "sophie jidehem".

2. Yeah, those posters look odd... they were in the Movies Wikia (yeah, a wiki for movies in general, oddly enough) and the Smurfs Wikia (the Smurfs did a cameo in one of her adventures). Could it be they are made-up hoaxes?

3. Damn am I absent-minded. Uploaded it.
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Anonymous user #2

8 months ago
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Further inspection of the Disney poster shows that "HERE COMES" is poorly imposed over the Sophie logo, the background color of the speech bubble looks like whatever text was originally there was poorly scribbled out, and there's a visible red block around the signature beneath the title. My guess is this is a fanmade poster edited out of an existing image.

The other posters look real though.
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Anonymous user #2

8 months ago
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Found the original picture. For some reason I can't link it here but do a google image search for "Verso(underscore)20243.jpg" (and replace that with an actual underscore) and it should come up
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Anonymous user #2

8 months ago
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Oh, duh! Aside from what I just said, the Disney one is a blatant fake because it says "Digital Soundtrack on Buena Vista Records", despite the fact that digital audio wasn't a thing back in 1979!
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Reynard

8 months ago
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Yes, that is because the art and layout of the Disney poster was made from already existing art used for the back of the comic book: http://lostm...phie_dos.jpg http://lostm...so_20243.jpg

Maybe it was officially reused for the poster because they thought it was good enough... and it was painted over... a bit poorly...
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Reynard

8 months ago
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Wait, what?? "Digital soundtrack"...? Does "digital" necessarily mean something too modern and high-tech for that time?

I've seen in a blog that "The soundtrack to “The Black Hole” in 1979 was the first digital soundtrack ever released"...
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Anonymous user #2

8 months ago
Score 0++
I think I found the post you're talking about, I will admit I'm no expert but it looks like that's talking about being digitally produced, while something like this would imply it was digitally distributed (like, on a CD or something). At least, I think.
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Reynard

8 months ago
Score 0++

A commenter on the shoutbox called tirofinale has linked me to this: http://pastebin.com/bQeD2buy

It seems as though at least one poster is fake...

But WHY would someone bother to do fake posters of a movie VERY FEW people would care about, and especially in ENGLISH where even LESS people would know about?
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Anonymous user #3

8 months ago
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Other then the posters, is there any proof this movie exists?

The mention of Molly Ringwald intrigued me. I have an old copy of TigerBeat from Jan 1980 (very soon after Molly's "first" acting role in the Facts of Life hit the air) which ran profiles on all the Facts of Life's cast members. They mention Molly Ringwald appearing in Annie (the stageplay) but make no mention of Here Comes Sophie, this would have been her debut role so it is a little odd it's never been mentioned by her. It's also unusual that a Google News search produces absolutely no relevant results. Surely this movie would have been mentioned in a newspaper, whether a review or showtime dates.

Think this might just be a hoax. :(
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Reynard

8 months ago
Score 0++

The movie still has a Wikipedia article and a blog mentions this is a Belvision movie along "Gulliver's Travels"... and it's been mentioned there was a DVD...

If it is a hoax, then why make it? The "Sophie" comic has not been known for decades, and even then, it was only fairly popular.
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Anonymous user #3

8 months ago
Score 0++

Yes but the Wikipedia page cites no sources and the only source the blog entry cites is the Wikipedia page.

As for why the would chose such an obscure comic, I'd imagine because it makes it more believable. It would be too far fetched if they chose something very well known like Calvin and Hobbes. But the fact that the only solid evidence of this existing turned out to be photo shopped and was traced back to someone with a history of lying about lost media makes me verrryyyy skeptical about this movie.

Of course that means it would be that much more interesting if this turned out to be real though....
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Anonymous user #4

8 months ago
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The music credits seem to give this one away as a hoax. On the first poster, the great Oscar-winning composer Michel Legrand is credited for lyrics. If Legrand had done anything it would've been as composer, as he's not a lyricist. There is also no record anywhere to be found online for a composer named Gerard Calm. This seems a bizarrely elaborate hoax.
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Anonymous user #5

4 months ago
Score 1++
Can we just change this to fake already
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