Peppa Pig (lost American dub of animated series; 2005)


(Redirected from Peppa Pig (Lost American Dub of Animated Series; 2005))

Peppa Pig (U.S. dub)
The title card for Peppa Pig
The title card for Peppa Pig
Status Partially Found

Peppa Pig is one of the longest-running British animated preschool programs of all time, being shown in a whopping 180 territories in 40 languages, along with having over a billion dollars worth of merchandise sold all around the world. But prior to being rerun on Nick Jr. in the 2010s, Peppa Pig was first shown to the American audience in 2005 with an American dub, in the ill-fated Cartoon Network preschool block, Tickle-U.

As Tickle-U only lasted a year and a half, the U.S. dub was lost along with the block. The only footage of the dub that has been found is a 30-second promo video from Tickle-U. All post-2007 U.S. releases and airings of the show use the U.K. dub, as the American dub received poor ratings.

Voice Cast

Elaine Torres said that she voiced Suzy Sheep in the American broadcast[1]. In addition, Chloe Dolandis has stated on her resume that she was the voice of Emily Elephant and Richard Rabbit. According to Dolandis' resume, the recording studio was Chrom Studios.[2] Chrom Studios is a dubbing studio based in Miami, Florida.[3]

Discoveries

Audio clips of Peppa, George, Mommy Pig, and Daddy Pig's American laughter can be heard in the game Swirlygig[4].

Elaine Torres' Voices.com profile includes a short clip of Suzy Sheep talking to Daddy Pig, as part of her animation/commercial reel.[5]

Tickle-U Promo.

In addition, a Tickle U promo for Peppa Pig using the American dub has been found.

References

  1. Elaine Torres's Voices.com profile
  2. Chloe Dolandis's Voiceover Resume
  3. http://www.manta.com/c/mb5933n/chrom-dubbing-studios
  4. An archive of the Swirlygig game
  5. Demo of Elaine Torres as Suzy

Comments


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Anonymous user #1

12 months ago
Score 1++
The script really only works with the British VA's. Otherwise it just sounds weird.
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Anonymous user #2

11 months ago
Score 1++
Gonna be 100% honest. I remember watching the U.S. dub of the episode "Pancakes" once on Cartoon Network On Demand years ago. I think it was my first introduction to British animation.
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Anonymous user #9

3 months ago
Score 0++
Can you give us the footage?
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Mewtwowimmer

3 months ago
Score 0++
The footage hsn't been seen anywhere in the last 10 years.
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Brb1006

2 months ago
Score 0++
I remember watching the "Pancakes" episode the most.
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Kaiju

9 months ago
Score 0++
To be honest I can't even believe Peppa Pig got to where it is today. It honestly just has no point to it.
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Aranea

8 months ago
Score 0++
It's extremely cheap to produce and merchandise. Basically.
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CryClown

8 months ago
Score 0++
peppa pig, the ultimate pig
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Anonymous user #3

8 months ago
Score 0++
UK dubs in the US? Doesn't that cause children to learn the wrong dialect for their country?
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Anonymous user #4

8 months ago
Score 2++
I don't disagree with you it's definitely true to a extent, but I believe the way you put it is a bit simplified, let me use an example. Let's say you air a show made in Texas and air it in New York, you could argue that's very similar to this. Their culture's are different from each other and as a result they act a bit differently which then leads to them forming their own mannerisms and eventually form different dialects. But you don't need to make dub for New York because while they do have different dialects they're still talking in they share a similar culture and speak the same language and live in the same country and as a result they're still similar to each other, therefore a work that appeals to one will most likely appeal to the other. The same goes for the US and the UK as they're similar to each other in many of the same ways as the NY, TX example minus being in the same country. Now there's definitely instances where you need to change something in a UK work for for a US audience and vice-versa, but even when there's changes that need to be made it makes more sense to rerecord the few lines that need changing with the original cast then to hire a new cast seeing as you generally aren't changing most of the lines anyways. As for a show teaching dialect it certainly can influence the way you speak, but it's not going to influence it more then anybody around you as they're the ones you're paying more attention to them and talking to them regularly. Well that's my thoughts anyways, I could be wrong, there's probably places that research this stuff and are way better at writing then me.
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Aranea

7 months ago
Score 0++

Nah, it doesn't really happen. No child raised outside of North America watches an American TV show and then speaks only in an American dialect from there on in. There's occasions where a child may adopt aspects of the accent, like putting emphasis on a syllable or pronouncing things the way they've heard on the TV show... but otherwise, your environmental factors for speech far outweigh a few hours of television per day. Parents will correct their kids, friends will correct the kid on the playground, the teacher will correct the kid in class if they're mispronouncing words, etc.

But even still, people fear that infant minds are these sponges and exposure to TV shows will permanently mar their language acquisition. People used to worry that Teletubbies and any other show that used "baby talk" would stunt regular speech development, and the aforementioned complaint with American TV shows for children. But it's all just hogwash, even though it's STILL practiced today! (For example, I had to watch a lot of Lazytown while babysitting. CBeebies dubs it into British English for very little reason. There's also a UK dub of Maggie & The Ferocious Beast and Caillou on this very wiki that's gone missing.)

I think it's probably because for over 40 years, the British have had mostly homegrown shows, and of course there's a standard 'accent' which people (especially those with broad regional accents) are meant to aspire to and use for work and on the phone and such. Not 100% sure on this, but I'm guessing some older fuddie-duddies at the BBC insisted on British English for their children's programming and that's been the way ever since.
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Anonymous user #4

8 months ago
Score 0++

I don't disagree with you it's definitely true to a extent, but I believe the way you put it is a bit simplified, let me use an example. Let's say you air a show made in Texas and air it in New York, you could argue that's very similar to this. Their culture's are different from each other and as a result they act a bit differently which then leads to them forming their own mannerisms and eventually form different dialects. But you don't need to make dub for New York because while they do have different dialects they're still talking in they share a similar culture and speak the same language and live in the same country and as a result they're still similar to each other, therefore a work that appeals to one will most likely appeal to the other. The same goes for the US and the UK as they're similar to each other in many of the same ways as the NY, TX example minus being in the same country. Now there's definitely instances where you need to change something in a UK work for for a US audience and vice-versa, but even when there's changes that need to be made it makes more sense to rerecord the few lines that need changing with the original cast then to hire a new cast seeing as you generally aren't changing most of the lines anyways. As for a show teaching dialect it certainly can influence the way you speak, but it's not going to influence it more then anybody around you as they're the ones you're paying more attention to them and talking to them regularly.

Well that's my thoughts anyways, I could be wrong, there's probably places that research this stuff and are way better at writing then me.
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Anonymous user #4

8 months ago
Score 0++
Oops, I mean't to post this as a reply, please ignore this.
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Anonymous user #5

7 months ago
Score 1++
I don't know if this might be of any help but I remember years ago when I was a kid (maybe 2006 - 2008), I used a trick I knew to get into the US cartoon network since I liked it better than the UK site. In the Tickle TV page, there was a section for Peppa pig with some flash games and other stuff. The US dub was used on the whole section. I only played the games there so I don't really have a good memory of what else was on there. Maybe if someone looked in a archive, you might find something.
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Anonymous user #6

5 months ago
Score 0++
i remember watching peppa pig on cn
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Anonymous user #7

5 months ago
Score 0++
I just can't imagine peppa and co. speaking in an American accent...
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Mewtwowimmer

4 months ago
Score 0++
does anyone know who the American voice actors were?
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Anonymous user #8

4 months ago
Score 0++
A little bird told me that this cartoon was dubbed in Seattle or Canada.
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Anonymous user #10

3 months ago
Score 0++
Concerning this, I wonder if there was a Now/Then icon for Peppa Pig in the 2004-2006 City era.
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Mewtwowimmer

3 months ago
Score 0++
No, there was only an icon for Tickle-U… and MAYBE Harry.
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Anonymous user #10

3 months ago
Score 0++
Oh.
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ApolloJustice

2 months ago
Score 0++
Whoever added that bit about Chrom Studios, could they please provide a source? Thanks
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Mewtwowimmer

2 months ago
Score 0++
That would be me. I googled the "Chrom Studios" name in Chloe Dolandis' resume and got a studio in Miami, Florida. And Elaine Torres' Voices.com profile says that she's also done voice-over work in Miami.
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Anonymous user #11

2 months ago
Score 0++

I KNEW IT! I KNEW IT WAS NOT CRAZY! I remember seeing this on TV in 2006, First broadcast in English with subtitles, With Spanish dubbing (I live in Argentina)

Nobody believed me! And now I find this behind it
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Brb1006

2 months ago
Score 0++
I was lucky to be able to own On Demand. Since I was still able to watch almost every episode of Peppa Pig that contained it's American Dub. It's a shame that I didn't think of taping these episodes.
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Anonymous user #12

1 months ago
Score 0++
Now All UK Shows need US Dubs because the US Viewers would say "I Don't Understand!". Luckily Tickle U Knew that. Like PBS done for Mama Mirabelle, For Example.
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Anonymous user #13

12 days ago
Score 0++
I watched this dub when I was little. Then when they stopped showing it and I saw the British one for the first time, that was when my parents explained dubs to me
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