Difference between revisions of "Arsenal vs Arsenal Reserves (lost footage of early BBC televised football match; 1937)"

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==Background==
 
==Background==
Prior to the televised match, Arsenal Football Club already made media history by being part of the first live football radio broadcast, when it faced Sheffield United in 1927. Ten years later, BBC would again select Arsenal, this time to feature in its relatively new Television Service in order to showcase the platform's ability to show live sport.<ref>[http://tdifh.blogspot.com/2010/09/16-september-1937-were-pretty-sure.html ''This Day in Football History'' blog detailing Arsenal's history of being pioneers for various media platforms] Retrieved 29 Apr '21</ref> The reasoning behind this choice centred around Arsenal's Highbury Stadium being the closest football ground to BBC's headquarters at Alexandra Palace, with its East Stand containing a gantry already suitable for cameras.<ref>[https://www.theguardian.com/football/tvandradioblog/2015/sep/16/how-arsenal-blazed-tv-trail-jostling-for-airtime-with-cartoons-and-smut ''The Guardian'', which provided history of the match during its 78th anniversary.] Retrieved 29 Apr '21</ref> The move was further logical as only a few televisions could receive the Alexandra Palace signal, spanning about ten miles away.<ref>[https://blog.woolwicharsenal.co.uk/archives/14893 ''Woolwich Arsenal'' blog, detailing the occasion and debunking the video claimed to have been recorded prior to the match.] Retrieved 29 Apr '21</ref>
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Prior to the televised match, Arsenal Football Club already made media history by being part of the first live football radio broadcast, when it faced Sheffield United in 1927. Ten years later, BBC would again select Arsenal, this time to feature in its relatively new Television Service in order to showcase the platform's ability to show live sport.<ref>[http://tdifh.blogspot.com/2010/09/16-september-1937-were-pretty-sure.html ''This Day in Football History'' blog detailing Arsenal's history of being pioneers for various media platforms] Retrieved 29 Apr '21</ref> The reasoning behind this choice centered around Arsenal's Highbury Stadium being the closest football ground to BBC's headquarters at Alexandra Palace, with its East Stand containing a gantry already suitable for cameras.<ref>[https://www.theguardian.com/football/tvandradioblog/2015/sep/16/how-arsenal-blazed-tv-trail-jostling-for-airtime-with-cartoons-and-smut ''The Guardian'', which provided history of the match during its 78th anniversary.] Retrieved 29 Apr '21</ref> The move was further logical as only a few televisions could receive the Alexandra Palace signal, spanning about ten miles away.<ref>[https://blog.woolwicharsenal.co.uk/archives/14893 ''Woolwich Arsenal'' blog, detailing the occasion and debunking the video claimed to have been recorded prior to the match.] Retrieved 29 Apr '21</ref>
  
Arsenal's first and reserve teams were selected to face each other in a friendly for the sole purpose of providing a television demonstration. According to the ''Manchester Guardian'', three cameras were used to show the match, two being at the respective goalmouths to show play close-ups and interviews, another being in the stands to show the ground in a more comprehensive manner.<ref>''Manchester Guardian'', which detailed the camera placement for the match. Retrieved 29 Apr '21</ref> The broadcast of the match lasted fifteen minutes, a result of BBC Television Service's limited hour-long daily schedule. George Allison, who was both Arsenal's manager and a BBC radio commentator, would first introduce the players to the television viewers, with the rest of the broadcast dedicated to the match. The schedule labelled the segment as ''Football at the Arsenal''.
+
Arsenal's first and reserve teams were selected to face each other in a friendly for the sole purpose of providing a television demonstration. According to the ''Manchester Guardian'', three cameras were used to show the match, two being at the respective goalmouths to show play close-ups and interviews, another being in the stands to show the ground in a more comprehensive manner.<ref>''Manchester Guardian'', which detailed the camera placement for the match. Retrieved 29 Apr '21</ref> The broadcast of the match lasted fifteen minutes, a result of BBC Television Service's limited hour-long daily schedule. George Allison, who was both Arsenal's manager and a BBC radio commentator, would first introduce the players to the television viewers, with the rest of the broadcast dedicated to the match. The schedule labeled the segment as ''Football at the Arsenal''.
  
 
Ultimately, the broadcast was deemed a success. The BBC would later break further ground in broadcasting live football, firstly by partially broadcasting the 1937 FA Cup Final between Sunderland and Preston North End, and later an England-Scotland international game in full on 9th April 1938. Meanwhile, Arsenal would later go on to become the 1937-38 First Division champions.<ref>[https://www.worldfootball.net/schedule/eng-premier-league-1937-1938/ ''World Football'', detailing the 1937-38 First Division league table.] Retrieved 29 Apr '21</ref> The result of the match was not properly archived and has been lost to time.
 
Ultimately, the broadcast was deemed a success. The BBC would later break further ground in broadcasting live football, firstly by partially broadcasting the 1937 FA Cup Final between Sunderland and Preston North End, and later an England-Scotland international game in full on 9th April 1938. Meanwhile, Arsenal would later go on to become the 1937-38 First Division champions.<ref>[https://www.worldfootball.net/schedule/eng-premier-league-1937-1938/ ''World Football'', detailing the 1937-38 First Division league table.] Retrieved 29 Apr '21</ref> The result of the match was not properly archived and has been lost to time.
  
 
==Availability==
 
==Availability==
Like other early BBC television broadcasts, the Arsenal-Arsenal Reserves match was broadcast live and was not recorded. Therefore, footage of the match is now permanently missing. A photo of the Arsenal teams posing for a BBC mobile television unit provides the only accessible media of the match. A video featuring an introduction of the team was claimed to have been recorded prior to the broadcast. However, this was debunked by the ''Woolwich Arsenal'' blog, who noted that one of the narrators, Herbert Chapman, had already passed away three years earlier.
+
Like other early BBC television broadcasts, the Arsenal-Arsenal Reserves match was broadcast live and was not recorded. Therefore, footage of the match is now permanently missing. A photo of the Arsenal teams posing for a BBC mobile television unit provides the only accessible media of the match. A video featuring an introduction of the team was claimed to have been recorded prior to the broadcast. However, this was debunked by the ''Woolwich Arsenal'' blog, which noted that one of the narrators, Herbert Chapman, had already passed away three years earlier.
  
 
==References==
 
==References==

Revision as of 23:37, 29 April 2021

Arsenalvsarsenalreserves1.jpeg

The Arsenal teams posing for the television camera unit

Status: Lost

On 13th September 1937, Arsenal's first and reserve teams competed against each other in a friendly match. This match proved historic, because it was the first instance of a televised football match, being broadcast on BBC television.

Background[edit | edit source]

Prior to the televised match, Arsenal Football Club already made media history by being part of the first live football radio broadcast, when it faced Sheffield United in 1927. Ten years later, BBC would again select Arsenal, this time to feature in its relatively new Television Service in order to showcase the platform's ability to show live sport.[1] The reasoning behind this choice centered around Arsenal's Highbury Stadium being the closest football ground to BBC's headquarters at Alexandra Palace, with its East Stand containing a gantry already suitable for cameras.[2] The move was further logical as only a few televisions could receive the Alexandra Palace signal, spanning about ten miles away.[3]

Arsenal's first and reserve teams were selected to face each other in a friendly for the sole purpose of providing a television demonstration. According to the Manchester Guardian, three cameras were used to show the match, two being at the respective goalmouths to show play close-ups and interviews, another being in the stands to show the ground in a more comprehensive manner.[4] The broadcast of the match lasted fifteen minutes, a result of BBC Television Service's limited hour-long daily schedule. George Allison, who was both Arsenal's manager and a BBC radio commentator, would first introduce the players to the television viewers, with the rest of the broadcast dedicated to the match. The schedule labeled the segment as Football at the Arsenal.

Ultimately, the broadcast was deemed a success. The BBC would later break further ground in broadcasting live football, firstly by partially broadcasting the 1937 FA Cup Final between Sunderland and Preston North End, and later an England-Scotland international game in full on 9th April 1938. Meanwhile, Arsenal would later go on to become the 1937-38 First Division champions.[5] The result of the match was not properly archived and has been lost to time.

Availability[edit | edit source]

Like other early BBC television broadcasts, the Arsenal-Arsenal Reserves match was broadcast live and was not recorded. Therefore, footage of the match is now permanently missing. A photo of the Arsenal teams posing for a BBC mobile television unit provides the only accessible media of the match. A video featuring an introduction of the team was claimed to have been recorded prior to the broadcast. However, this was debunked by the Woolwich Arsenal blog, which noted that one of the narrators, Herbert Chapman, had already passed away three years earlier.

References[edit | edit source]