Difference between revisions of "At a Quarter of Two (lost silent film; 1911)"

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'''''At a Quarter of Two''''' is a silent film directed by famed film producer Thomas H. Ince that was released on the 13th of July, 1911. Otherwise, not much is known about the film, other than that it stars the actress Mary Pickford, the actor Owen Moore, and its plot involves Mary's (Mrs. Warren in the film according to a Wikipedia article on her filmography, but a reliable source repeating this information cannot be found) life being threatened by a burglar while she is caring for her sick child.<ref>[http://pickfordfilmlegacy.tripod.com/libraryofcongresspd.htm  Library of Congress Project Report, which has a section on the film.] Retrieved 06 Aug '19</ref>
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'''''At a Quarter of Two''''', also known as ''At a Quarter After Two'' and ''At a Quarter to Two'', is a silent film that was directed and produced by Independent Motion Pictures (IMP), and released in 1911. The film stars actress Mary Pickford and actor King Baggot in the lead roles. <ref>[http://pickfordfilmlegacy.tripod.com/libraryofcongresspd.htm  Library of Congress Project Report, which has a section on the film.] Retrieved 06 Aug '19</ref>
  
In 1995, the Library of Congress (Washington DC, United States) acquired some fragments of a print of the movie.<ref>Ibid ref no. 1.</ref> How much of the film was acquired is unclear, and these fragments have never been released online. It is possible that they could be accessed physically at the Library of Congress, but there is no online reference as to their access restrictions (if there are any).
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In 1914, the film was re-released under the title ''Mr. Burglar, M. D.'' being shown as a Universal picture after IMP and other film agencies all merged to create one studio. The new name took form from the plot of the film in which Dan Nolan (King Baggot) was unemployed due to a worker's strike, and grows hungry and desperate to point of stealing. He finds a residence of which he can easily burglarize, and cuts the telephone wires so that the police can't be called. He breaks into the room of a sick child and hides in the closet as a nurse and mother attempt to care for the child. In the end, Nolan finds himself helping to care for the child with a change of heart, rather than further attempting malice.
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In 1995, the Library of Congress (Washington DC, United States) acquired some fragments of a print of the movie. How much of the film was acquired is unclear, and these fragments have never been released online. It is possible that they could be accessed physically at the Library of Congress, but there is no online reference as what to their access restrictions are.
  
 
==References==
 
==References==

Revision as of 02:05, 26 November 2019

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This article has been tagged as Needing work due to its lack of content.



Quarteroftwo.jpg

The only locatable image of the film.

Status: Lost

At a Quarter of Two, also known as At a Quarter After Two and At a Quarter to Two, is a silent film that was directed and produced by Independent Motion Pictures (IMP), and released in 1911. The film stars actress Mary Pickford and actor King Baggot in the lead roles. [1]

In 1914, the film was re-released under the title Mr. Burglar, M. D. being shown as a Universal picture after IMP and other film agencies all merged to create one studio. The new name took form from the plot of the film in which Dan Nolan (King Baggot) was unemployed due to a worker's strike, and grows hungry and desperate to point of stealing. He finds a residence of which he can easily burglarize, and cuts the telephone wires so that the police can't be called. He breaks into the room of a sick child and hides in the closet as a nurse and mother attempt to care for the child. In the end, Nolan finds himself helping to care for the child with a change of heart, rather than further attempting malice.

In 1995, the Library of Congress (Washington DC, United States) acquired some fragments of a print of the movie. How much of the film was acquired is unclear, and these fragments have never been released online. It is possible that they could be accessed physically at the Library of Congress, but there is no online reference as what to their access restrictions are.

Contents

References