Difference between revisions of "Chicken Little 2 (cancelled sequel to Disney animated comedy film; 2006)"

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Revision as of 22:19, 30 March 2020

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This article has been tagged as Needing work due to its lack of clarity.



Chickenlittle.jpeg

a poster for the first movie.

Status: Lost

Chicken Little 2: Mission to Mars is a cancelled sequel to the 2005 Disney animated film Chicken Little. The tie-in video game Chicken Little: Ace in Action served as the actual sequel for the film instead.

Plot

Chicken Little finds himself in a love triangle, on the other side, his childhood sweetheart, Abby "Ugly Ducking" Mallard, the third side is an attractive newcomer named Raffaela, the French sheep. Abby is at a tremendous disadvantage, so she gives herself a makeover.

Production

The earliest known mention of the film is in the 2005 Dorling Kindersley tie-in book Chicken Little: The Essential Guide.

Not much is known about the production of the film, as it was cancelled. Tod Carter said something about the film.

"Not long after that project was shelved, I received a call from Klay Hall, who was directing Chicken Little 2. He was given the mandate to create a story reel for his project in the same time frame that we did for Aristocats 2. I don’t think he or the other board artists at Disney were too excited about the deadline, but I guess Klay figured that it would be a good idea to get someone involved who had actually had experience working at this pace. Overall, the script for Chicken Little 2 was pretty good and I felt great about the sequences in which I was involved. Klay gave me a good deal of freedom to invent and I really appreciated working with him and loved the project."[1]

In 2014, Tod posted two storyboard sequences from the film on his blog portfolio.[2][3]

Gallery

References