Difference between revisions of "Dorothy and the Scarecrow in Oz /The Land of Oz (lost film sequels based on book; 1910)"

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The Oz Scrapbook (book, 1975, pages 50-51 approximately)
 
The Oz Scrapbook (book, 1975, pages 50-51 approximately)
  
Down the Yellow Brick Road: An expedition to the Wonderful Land of Oz (book by Alan Eyles, "Early Oz Films," pages 40-41)
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Down the Yellow Brick Road: A Fantastic expedition to the Wonderful Land of Oz (book by Alan Eyles, "Early Oz Films," pages 40-41)

Revision as of 19:02, 9 July 2019

Dorothy and the Scarecrow in Oz and The Land of Oz are the two lost sequels to the existing 1910 film, The Wizard of Oz.

Synopsis

These films continue the story told in the existing 15-minute film mentioned above. Apparently, after leaving the Wizard's castle, the Scarecrow and Dorothy head west, where they meet the wicked witch living there. Doing battle with the witch, whose name is Momba, they defeat her and free a young boy named Tip from her clutches. He joins them on the trip back to the Emerald City to meet the Wizard.

In the third film, the group meets with several perils on the way back to the Emerald City, including General Jinjur, who has taken over the place and replaced the palace staff with her girl soldiers. Eventually, the group routs Ginger and her army and Tip is revealed by the sorceress Maetta to be actually Princess Ozma, the long-lost heir to the throne of the Emerald City, who takes the throne and sends Dorothy home.

Notes

As with the French film The Life of Christ, the story is told in pantomime, with infrequent title screens, the films being silent. The actors for the first film were all uncredited, and sadly, this means that the name of the first actor to play the role of the Wizard of Oz on the silver screen will never be known.

External Links

https://en.wikipedia.com/wiki/adaptations_of_the_Wizard_of_Oz

References

The Oz Scrapbook (book, 1975, pages 50-51 approximately)

Down the Yellow Brick Road: A Fantastic expedition to the Wonderful Land of Oz (book by Alan Eyles, "Early Oz Films," pages 40-41)