Difference between revisions of "London After Midnight (lost Lon Chaney mystery horror film; 1927)"

From The Lost Media Wiki
Jump to: navigation, search
 
Line 23: Line 23:
  
 
===Current Status===
 
===Current Status===
It is unknown if any copies of the film exist. Several nitrate frames recovered from a film projectionist and well over 200 production images have survived, and rumours of surviving prints have persisted as early as the 1980s, although none of these sources have been confirmed, and any effort to find a complete version of the film have proven unsuccessful.
+
It is unknown if any copies of the film exist. Several nitrate frames recovered from an unknown collector and well over 200 production images have survived, and rumours of surviving prints have persisted as early as the 1980s, although none of these sources have been confirmed, and any effort to find a complete version of the film have proven unsuccessful.
  
 
==Reconstruction==
 
==Reconstruction==

Latest revision as of 01:08, 24 February 2022

London After Midnight Theatrical Poster.jpg

Theatrical poster for London After Midnight.

Status: Lost

London After Midnight is a 1927 silent horror/mystery film written by Tod Browning (Dracula, Freaks) and starring Lon Chaney (The Hunchback of Notre Dame, The Phantom of the Opera). The film is an adaptation of The Hypnotist, written by Browning as well. It is also one of the last major films to star Lon Chaney before his death on August 26th, 1930. A remake of the film was produced by Browning in 1935 titled The Mark of the Vampire.

Synopsis[edit | edit source]

Lon Chaney as "the Stranger", shows off his frightening wings.

Sir Roger Belfour, the head of a luxurious mansion, is found dead alongside a suicide note. Professor Edward Burke (Lon Chaney) is placed in charge of investigating the incident. Sir James Hamlin, Belfour's neighbor, was the last to see him alive. Naturally, Burke questions him and Belfour's butler, Williams. Burke's questioning leads him to suspect Arthur Hibbs, Hamlin's nephew.

Five years later, the mansion has become dilapidated and is now a subject of ill omen. The mansion is now occupied by an eccentric old man who goes by the name Roger Belfour and a ghostly woman, renting from Hamlin. Professor Burke is once again drawn to the house to investigate stories of vampires residing within. Unbeknownst to the others, the man is actually Burke in disguise. With the use of hypnosis and a fake setup of vampires, Burke tricks Hamlin into revealing that he was the one who murdered Sir Roger Belfour five years before.

Release and Criticism[edit | edit source]

London After Midnight was shown at The Capitol in New York City on December 11th and ran for approximately 65 minutes.[1] Variety criticized the actors for being mostly uninteresting and also predicted that the film would sell solely on Lon Chaney's name.[2] Despite these critiques, the film was met with moderate success. Modern critics praise Chaney's makeup work as the creepy old man.

Despite the film's loss, Lon Chaney's appearance in the film has become a horror icon of its own right, influencing some portrayals of Dracula and other monsters such as The Babadook in 2014.[3]

Availability[edit | edit source]

The MGM Fire[edit | edit source]

The only known copy of London After Midnight is believed to have been destroyed in a large fire that supposedly occurred in the MGM Studio in 1965 in Vault 7. Verifiable information is difficult to find on the event, and it is still debated about amongst classic film fans to this day.[4] What seems to be commonly accepted is that the fire was caused by a combination of an electric spark and the nitrate film base used in the older film. Nitrate film base decomposes into a gas that is just as flammable, making it a likely cause for extreme fires. Several other films may have been lost due to the same fire such as A Blind Bargain, and The Divine Woman. It is noted that MGM began making more of an effort to preserve its films around this period, potentially confirming that a fire may have occurred around that time.

Current Status[edit | edit source]

It is unknown if any copies of the film exist. Several nitrate frames recovered from an unknown collector and well over 200 production images have survived, and rumours of surviving prints have persisted as early as the 1980s, although none of these sources have been confirmed, and any effort to find a complete version of the film have proven unsuccessful.

Reconstruction[edit | edit source]

A reconstruction of the film was assembled by Rick Schmidlin, a well-known filmmaker and film archivist, using over 200 still shots and a complete script. The film/slideshow is accompanied by an entirely original score from composer Robert Israel. This reconstruction was aired on the television station Turner Classic Movies on August 15th, 2002 as part of their tribute to Lon Chaney.[5] The reconstruction is also included on the Lon Chaney Collection DVD set.

Gallery[edit | edit source]

Videos[edit | edit source]

TheGamerFromMars' video on the subject.

Posters[edit | edit source]

Cinema Lobby Cards[edit | edit source]

Movie Stills[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]