Difference between revisions of "Sgt. Frog (lost ADV English dub of "Keroro Gunsou" anime series; late 2000s)"

From The Lost Media Wiki
Jump to: navigation, search
Line 3: Line 3:
 
The U.S. release was originally delayed because of these negotiations; ADV even began working with people from Summit Entertainment, who were behind the 4kids dub of Pokemon, in order to get the show on the air.
 
The U.S. release was originally delayed because of these negotiations; ADV even began working with people from Summit Entertainment, who were behind the 4kids dub of Pokemon, in order to get the show on the air.
  
It is unknown how many episodes were exactly dubbed (some say only a pilot was made, other says up to three episodes were made), however the episode(s) were dubbed three times; an otaku/fan pilot (similar to the FUNimation dub seen today), a mass-market pilot, and a kid-oriented pilot. Cartoon Network liked the mass-market pilot while Nickelodeon liked the kid-oriented pilot.
+
It is unknown how many episodes were exactly dubbed (some say only a pilot was made, other says up to three episodes were made), however, the episode(s) were dubbed three times; an otaku/fan pilot (similar to the FUNimation dub seen today), a mass-market pilot, and a kid-oriented pilot. Cartoon Network liked the mass-market pilot while Nickelodeon liked the kid-oriented pilot.
  
 
However, due to financial troubles ADV was having at the time leading up to their demise, the rights were transferred over to FUNimation Entertainment in 2008, who seemed to have no interest in pursuing a TV deal for Sgt. Frog. (Their dub contains several instances of risque content the original Japanese and ADV dubs did not, making it hard to sell to a children's network.)
 
However, due to financial troubles ADV was having at the time leading up to their demise, the rights were transferred over to FUNimation Entertainment in 2008, who seemed to have no interest in pursuing a TV deal for Sgt. Frog. (Their dub contains several instances of risque content the original Japanese and ADV dubs did not, making it hard to sell to a children's network.)
Line 11: Line 11:
 
{{#ev:youtube|https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fi2HpJHfUfA|320x240|center|The theme song used in the ADV dub.|frame}}
 
{{#ev:youtube|https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fi2HpJHfUfA|320x240|center|The theme song used in the ADV dub.|frame}}
  
[[Category:Lost animation]]
+
[[Category:Lost audio]]
 +
[[Category:Lost TV]]

Revision as of 18:01, 11 December 2016

In late 2006, the anime Sgt. Frog was licensed by ADV Films. Seeing its potential as a hit on the children's show market, as the anime boom was dying out Sgt. Frog had the potential to kick it into full swing again.

The U.S. release was originally delayed because of these negotiations; ADV even began working with people from Summit Entertainment, who were behind the 4kids dub of Pokemon, in order to get the show on the air.

It is unknown how many episodes were exactly dubbed (some say only a pilot was made, other says up to three episodes were made), however, the episode(s) were dubbed three times; an otaku/fan pilot (similar to the FUNimation dub seen today), a mass-market pilot, and a kid-oriented pilot. Cartoon Network liked the mass-market pilot while Nickelodeon liked the kid-oriented pilot.

However, due to financial troubles ADV was having at the time leading up to their demise, the rights were transferred over to FUNimation Entertainment in 2008, who seemed to have no interest in pursuing a TV deal for Sgt. Frog. (Their dub contains several instances of risque content the original Japanese and ADV dubs did not, making it hard to sell to a children's network.)

At one point, a script containing both the original Japanese-translated lines and one of the pilot's lines for episode 13 of the series was online; however, the script has now gone missing as well.

The theme song used in the ADV dub.