Difference between revisions of "User: Em the LMW fan/Testpage"

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With well over 2,000 episodes and 7,000 segments, an overwhelming majority of the series is currently unavailable to watch in any form.<ref>[https://www.japantoday.com/category/entertainment/view/sazae-san-enters-guinness-world-records-as-longest-running-animated-tv-series Japan Today news page on the series entering Guinness World Records] Retrieved 11 Feb '17.</ref><ref>[http://www.animenewsnetwork.com/encyclopedia/anime.php?id=870 Anime News Network page for the show] Retrieved 11 Feb '17.</ref>
 
With well over 2,000 episodes and 7,000 segments, an overwhelming majority of the series is currently unavailable to watch in any form.<ref>[https://www.japantoday.com/category/entertainment/view/sazae-san-enters-guinness-world-records-as-longest-running-animated-tv-series Japan Today news page on the series entering Guinness World Records] Retrieved 11 Feb '17.</ref><ref>[http://www.animenewsnetwork.com/encyclopedia/anime.php?id=870 Anime News Network page for the show] Retrieved 11 Feb '17.</ref>
 
 
==Content and History==
 
==Content and History==
 
''Sazae-san'' is a family-oriented slice-of-life series, centered on a Japanese housewife named Sazae Fuguta. Every episode is based on a small adventure from the simplistic daily lives of Sazae and her family. Each episode consists of 3 eight-minute segments, featuring relatively basic plotlines such as Sazae getting lost at the mall, or her brother Kazuo faking a stomach ache to stay home from school.
 
''Sazae-san'' is a family-oriented slice-of-life series, centered on a Japanese housewife named Sazae Fuguta. Every episode is based on a small adventure from the simplistic daily lives of Sazae and her family. Each episode consists of 3 eight-minute segments, featuring relatively basic plotlines such as Sazae getting lost at the mall, or her brother Kazuo faking a stomach ache to stay home from school.
  
 
Aside from a few changes in design, the format of the series has remained largely unchanged since the manga began in 1946. As such, the setup is typically viewed as that of a “traditional” Japanese household and is currently regarded as a throwback to simpler times. The series has aired almost every Sunday night since its premiere in 1969 and is still extremely popular in Japan, continuing to pull the highest viewership of any animated series on Japanese television.
 
Aside from a few changes in design, the format of the series has remained largely unchanged since the manga began in 1946. As such, the setup is typically viewed as that of a “traditional” Japanese household and is currently regarded as a throwback to simpler times. The series has aired almost every Sunday night since its premiere in 1969 and is still extremely popular in Japan, continuing to pull the highest viewership of any animated series on Japanese television.
 
{{Video|perrow  =4
 
  |service2    =youtube
 
  |id2          =o7jV0toh6LQ
 
  |description2 =Opening song
 
  |service3    =youtube
 
  |id3          =VDvd0_mbaDU
 
  |description3 =Closing song
 
}}
 
 
==Availability==
 
==Availability==
<div class="row">
 
<div class="col-lg-8 col-sm-12">
 
 
Despite ''Sazae-san''’s popularity, only a small percentage of episodes have surfaced online. The most obvious reason for this is due to Machiko Hasegawa’s request that there be no home video releases of the series. Even after her death in 1992, her wish was honored, and to this day not a single episode has been released outside of TV broadcasts.
 
Despite ''Sazae-san''’s popularity, only a small percentage of episodes have surfaced online. The most obvious reason for this is due to Machiko Hasegawa’s request that there be no home video releases of the series. Even after her death in 1992, her wish was honored, and to this day not a single episode has been released outside of TV broadcasts.
  
 
This, combined with the fact that most episodes air once and never again, ''and'' the fact that the series has been running since long before home taping became commonplace, means recordings of most early episodes are nonexistent outside of studio archives.<ref>[http://cartoonresearch.com/index.php/the-longest-running-tv-cartoon-ever/ Cartoon Research article on the show] Retrieved 11 Feb '17.</ref>
 
This, combined with the fact that most episodes air once and never again, ''and'' the fact that the series has been running since long before home taping became commonplace, means recordings of most early episodes are nonexistent outside of studio archives.<ref>[http://cartoonresearch.com/index.php/the-longest-running-tv-cartoon-ever/ Cartoon Research article on the show] Retrieved 11 Feb '17.</ref>
</div>
+
 
<div class="col-lg-4 col-sm-12">
 
{{#ev:youtube|can14-vDWFE|320x180|center|''Sazae-san'''s first episode|frame}}
 
</div>
 
</div>
 
 
However, even many modern episodes have not resurfaced online either, due to Fuji TV’s aggressive takedown orders and a lack of any serious preservation effort from fans.<ref>[https://myanimelist.net/forum/?topicid=434997#msg20141113 Forum post describing the show's international obscurity] Retrieved 11 Feb '17.</ref> The exact number of found segments is unknown and constantly changing; notably, a few early episodes have turned up after being re-aired in various anniversary specials. Aside from this, many episodes from the 2010s can be found on YouTube, but without any clear organization. Episodes from other eras appear to be few and far between.
 
However, even many modern episodes have not resurfaced online either, due to Fuji TV’s aggressive takedown orders and a lack of any serious preservation effort from fans.<ref>[https://myanimelist.net/forum/?topicid=434997#msg20141113 Forum post describing the show's international obscurity] Retrieved 11 Feb '17.</ref> The exact number of found segments is unknown and constantly changing; notably, a few early episodes have turned up after being re-aired in various anniversary specials. Aside from this, many episodes from the 2010s can be found on YouTube, but without any clear organization. Episodes from other eras appear to be few and far between.
  
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   |description1 =The 2009 live-action special. ([https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LE7sLdkI8hc 2010]/[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=esdtPBhpYzU 2011])
 
   |description1 =The 2009 live-action special. ([https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LE7sLdkI8hc 2010]/[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=esdtPBhpYzU 2011])
 
}}
 
}}
==References==
 
{{reflist}}
 
 
==External Links==
 
==External Links==
 
* [https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sazae-san Wikipedia page for the franchise.]
 
* [https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sazae-san Wikipedia page for the franchise.]
 
* [https://myanimelist.net/anime/2406/Sazae-san MyAnimeList page for the series.]
 
* [https://myanimelist.net/anime/2406/Sazae-san MyAnimeList page for the series.]
 +
{{InfoboxLost
 +
|title=<center>Scribblekid Flashes (hentai animations)</center>
 +
|image=SKsite.jpeg
 +
|imagecaption=A screenshot of Scribblekid’s website, where the animations were uploaded.
 +
|status=<span style="color:red;">'''Lost'''</span>
 +
}}
 +
Dave Cheung, a.k.a. Scribblekid is an artist known for the webcomics ''Chugworth Academy'' and ''U. S. Angel Corps''. He also used to make '''Hentai Flash animations'''. After he abandoned his websites, many of these are now lost. While some of the flashes have been uploaded elsewhere, and many of Scribblekid's pictures have been preserved using the Internet Archive's Wayback Machine, many Flash animations and pictures are still missing.
 +
==Chugworth Academy: Pilot Episode==
 +
Possibly never even started, as it seems no material has ever been seen by the general public.<ref>[https://web.archive.org/web/20021101150626/http://www.scribblekid.org/chuggymovie.html Chugworth Academy: Pilot Episode at Scribblekid.org (archived).] Retrieved 15 Oct '15.</ref>
 +
==Cumshots Collection: Vol 1<ref>
 +
[https://web.archive.org/web/20021011082903/http://scribblekid.org/hentai/movies/cum1.htm Cumshots Collection: Vol 1 at Scribblekid.org (archived).] Retrieved 15 Oct '15.</ref>/Cumshots Col. #1<ref>[https://web.archive.org/web/20030807105128/http://scribblekid.org/hpolls/movies.php?index=17 Cumshots Col. #1 at Scribblekid.org (archived).] Retrieved 15 Oct '15.</ref>==
 +
As the title suggests, a collection of animations featuring three of Scribblekid's original characters receiving cumshots. Characters featured were Mia Uchiki, Emily Marshall, and Cacie Brennan.
 +
==LDS Vol. 1: Midnight Kiss==
 +
Possibly never completed, as it announced in 2002<ref>[https://web.archive.org/web/20021011083558/http://scribblekid.org/hentai/movies/lds1.htm LDS Vol. 1: Midnight Kiss at Scribblekid.org (archived).] Retrieved 15 Oct '15.</ref>, but was only at 60% completion in 2003.<ref>[https://web.archive.org/web/20030807104838/http://scribblekid.org/hpolls/movies.php?index=18 LDS Vol. 1: Midnight Kiss at Scribblekid.org (archived).] Retrieved 15 Oct '15.</ref> Scribblekid's description was as follows: "A short movie where young saucepot Keiren persuades the ever gullible Mia to do the dirty on him. I'm currently working away on this, so it should be ready in a few weeks.
 +
Stay glued to that TV Computer Screen !"
 +
 +
Dave Cheung has confirmed via a private message on Deviantart that this was never finished in animated form and he doesn't have any material from it anymore.
 +
==Mia Costume Box==
 +
Presumably a dress-up game featuring Scribblekid's original character Mia Uchiki.<ref>[https://web.archive.org/web/20030715175533/http://scribblekid.org/hpolls/series.php?type=1&index=9 Mia Costume Box at Scribblekid.org (archived).] Retrieved 15 Oct '15.</ref>
 +
==Emily Costume Box==
 +
Presumably, a dress-up game featuring Scribblekid's original character Emily Marshall.<ref>[https://web.archive.org/web/20030807105233/http://scribblekid.org/hpolls/series.php?type=1&index=10 Emily Costume Box at Scribblekid.org (archived).] Retrieved 15 Oct '15.</ref>
 +
==Cacie Costume Box==
 +
Presumably, a dress-up game featuring Scribblekid's original character Cacie Brennan.<ref>[https://web.archive.org/web/20030715161033/http://scribblekid.org/hpolls/series.php?type=1&index=11 Cacie Costume Box at Scribblekid.org (archived).] Retrieved 15 Oct '15.</ref>
 +
 +
{{InfoboxLost
 +
|title=<center>Sesame Street</center>
 +
|image=SS1969Cast.jpg
 +
|imagecaption=Cast photo from ''Sesame Street's'' first season.
 +
|status=<span style="color:orange;">'''Partially Lost'''</span>
 +
}}
 +
'''''Sesame Street''''' is a children’s television series that started in 1969. The series is one of the most well-known and longest running children’s television series of all time. Since its inception in 1969, the show has earned 159 Emmy Awards and 8 Grammy Awards, and an estimated 77 million Americans watched the series as children as of 2008.
 +
 +
Despite its massive multi-decade running time, it’s become an interest of avid fans of the series to document the series in its entirety, including descriptions for shorts in episodes ranging from the first season to the present.
 +
 +
While episode listings adapted from Children’s Television Workshop archives are complete in writing, many of the segments included in the listings are not available for audiences on any home video releases or digital releases. A complete listing of these is not available, largely due to the vast number of episodes of the series produced, but many of the popular segments that have been lost and found since the genesis of the Internet have been listed below.
 +
 +
Aside from segments that are unavailable to the general populace, at least [[wikia:w:c:muppet:Lost episodes of Sesame Street|sixty episodes are missing from Sesame Workshop's archive]].
 +
 +
==Granny Fanny Nesselrode Skits - Partially Found==
 +
Granny Fanny Nesselrode is an early old lady Muppet performed by Caroll Spinney during Season 1, Season 2 and Season 3. Her character was best known for her "Answer Lady" skits, in which she attempted to solve viewers' problems but fails miserably. The program was broadcast from her cozy, sun-filled kitchen in Goat Corners, New Hampshire. She also appeared in the first "Here is Your Life" sketch from 1972, where she celebrates the life of Oak Tree, coming down the road from a farmhouse to visit and pay her respects to the tree, whom she planted in the ground since he was just an acorn, hence also bringing a picture of the acorn. In that sketch, she was performed by Jim Henson.
 +
 +
There are a total of six known Answer Lady sketches: "Pencil", "Household Hints", "Ketchup Problem," "Classifying Kittens," "Telephone," and "Alphabet." Of these six skits known to include her (not counting the "Here is Your Life: Oak Tree" skit that can be easily found all over a batch of episodes and even on Sesame Street's official YT channel), "Classifying Kittens" is the only Answer Lady skit to be found in English. "Telephone" has been found in German. Pictures of "Ketchup Problem" and "Alphabet" have been uploaded by Oscarfan on Muppet Wiki, and "Pencil" has not resurfaced in any form. JFriendsFan96's uploads of "Classifying Kittens" and "Telephone" have been deleted due to him closing his account. So, the 2 links have been replaced with Ezra Plays's upload of "Classifying Kittens" and BigSesameFan21541200462's upload of the German dub of "Telephone".
 +
 +
{{Video|perrow  =3
 +
  |service1    =youtube
 +
  |id1          =S12zscwRRAs
 +
  |description1 =Classifying Kittens.
 +
  |service2    =youtube
 +
  |id2          =luwoOM2FI2I
 +
  |description2 =Telephone (German dub).
 +
  |service3    =youtube
 +
  |id3          =J5Bz8HehpsY
 +
  |description3 =Here is Your Life: Oak Tree.
 +
}}
 +
==Professor Hastings Skits - Partially Found==
 +
Professor Hastings is an early Muppet professor performed by Frank Oz from the first three seasons. His character was best known for boring himself to sleep with his own lectures.
 +
 +
[[File:ProfHastingsY.jpg|240px|thumb|right|Screenshot of Letter Y skit]]
 +
[[File:LetterY.png|240px|thumb|right|A fake screenshot of Letter Y skit, courtesy of Lost Media Wiki forums user Summertime. ]] Of the ten known skits to include him, the following is listed below:
 +
*Only one (What’s My Part?) has resurfaced in English.
 +
*Emotions have resurfaced in English (mostly fan-dubbed by a user but also using only a few actual English audio pieces taken from a documentary) with the video source deriving from the German dub.
 +
*Spinning Wheel has resurfaced in English but as incomplete (with the video starting halfway through the song, due to the only found VHS recording of the German dub from which it was audio-synced having missed the first half of the clip). However, the English version with the full uncut video clip had been on YouTube in 2006, but as usual, it had been long deleted.
 +
*Number 2's existence as a separate skit was rumored for many years, but this was debunked as the Number 2 skit actually turned out to be the same Dump Truck skit (thanks to a [https://muppet.wikia.com/wiki/Episode_0141 full episode guide for Episode 0141] that was recently added to Muppet Wiki via a trusted source) that had been found in Arabic.
 +
*Five other dubbed segments have resurfaced.
 +
*Letter Y was once posted on YouTube in German back in 2006 but has been long gone since and it is confirmed that Rohail Hashmi, tpirman1982 and other users do not have Letter Y saved on their desktops. On June 23, 2018, Lost Media Wiki forums user Summertime uploaded another screenshot of the letter Y segment, but as of 2019, this was discovered to be a fake screenshot due to a still of Hastings from a bad-quality video of the Emotions skit being photoshopped into the picture.<ref>[http://forums.lostmediawiki.com/thread/2521/letter-professor-hastings-skit-screenshot Forum post for a screenshot of the Professor Hastings Letter Y skit.]</ref>
 +
*The U Lecture skit was once posted on YouTube in German back in 2006, but as usual (along with all the other German Sesamstraße clips), it was pulled in February 2007 as a result of Viacom pulling 400,000,000 YouTubers and has not resurfaced ever since. From Episode 0297, it is basically a filmed version of the same song from The Muppet Alphabet Album, except that Kermit the Frog is in Ernie's place. Only the album track with Ernie has resurfaced.
 +
UPDATE: The English version of "Exercise" has been found, and can be viewed on Muppet Wiki's Facebook page.
 +
 +
[[File:Herbert Birdsfoot Grover ET Family.jpeg|thumb|right|Screenshot (as uploaded by Scarecroe on Muppet Wiki) showing proof that Herbert, instead Hastings, was in the final footage.]]
 +
Despite the 10 skits known to include him, [https://muppet.wikia.com/wiki/Episode_0138 the original drafted script for Episode 0138] actually contains a 3-part skit involving the ET word family, with Professor Hastings doing a lecture and Grover carrying the letters. Because of Hastings' appearance in the script, it was rumored for a little while that Hastings was in the filmed skit, but when Scarecroe recently started uploading screenshots of many long-unseen Classic Sesame Street episodes (especially for this skit) on Muppet Wiki during May of 2019, the rumor about Hastings' appearance in the final was debunked as it turns out he was replaced with Herbert Birdsfoot doing the lecture, while Grover remained intact.
 +
==Leslie Mostly Skits - Partially Found==
 +
Leslie Mostly is a short-lived Muppet from the eleventh and twelfth seasons. She was the host of “The Leslie Mostly Show,” a talk show host spoof series. Her segments are interviews with other Muppet characters, including The Amazing Mumford, Grover, Count von Count, Cookie Monster, Kermit the Frog, Guy Smiley, and the word “CASA.”
 +
 +
While most of Leslie Mostly's skits have been uploaded to YouTube in English, the Cookie Monster skit has been found in Castilian Spanish, and the Kermit skit has been found in Turkish. The Guy Smiley skit was once available on Verizon Wireless V Cast phones but is no longer available, making it the only one having not turned up online at this time. The uploaded clips can be viewed below.
 +
{{Video|perrow  =4
 +
  |service1    =youtube
 +
  |id1          =1zMKdL4GWh4
 +
  |description1 =The Amazing Mumford Interview.
 +
  |service2    =youtube
 +
  |id2          =aaR0F_1Y1qM
 +
  |description2 =Count von Count Interview.
 +
  |service3    =youtube
 +
  |id3          =_ZBFBnh7lD4
 +
  |description3 =Grover Interview.
 +
  |service4    =youtube
 +
  |id4          =gLUYO1PdVFM
 +
  |description4 =CASA Interview.
 +
}}
 +
==Deena and Pearl Skits - Partially Found==
 +
Deena and Pearl are a Muppet duo from the twelfth season. They were seen in a total of four sketches on the show before disappearing. Their discontinuance is largely attributed to the similarity of their segments to those of Ernie and Bert.
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 +
The four sketches include Baby Deena, Toy Box, Underwater, and Pearl is Sick.<ref>[http://muppet.wikia.com/wiki/Deena_and_Pearl_Sketches MuppetWiki entry on Deena and Pearl.] Retrieved 16 Sept ’16.</ref> Of these, Baby Deena is the only sketch uploaded on YouTube in English (as “Play House”). Toy Box has been uploaded in Dutch. Underwater and Pearl is Sick has been posted in Castilian Spanish.
 +
{{Video|perrow  =2
 +
  |service1    =youtube
 +
  |id1          =1AckH3gIyeg
 +
  |description1 =Baby Deena, also known as Play House.
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  |service2    =youtube
 +
  |id2          =t336N62sF7Q
 +
  |description2 =Toy Box (Dutch dub).
 +
}}
 +
==Gymnast Segments - Partially Found==
 +
The Gymnast segments are a series of inserts including a female gymnast (with blonde hair and wearing a black leotard) demonstrating various concepts using various gym apparatuses - like pommel horses and uneven bars -  in a darkened, nondescript location. Two of the seven inserts featuring this gymnast - <b>Around</b> and <b>Between</b> - have resurfaced on YouTube; the five that haven’t are:
 +
 +
<b>Beginning/End</b> (uneven bars)<br>
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<b>Close To/Away From</b> (rings)<br>
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<b>Over/Under</b> (pommel horse)<br>
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<b>Slow</b> (uneven bars - slow motion)<br>
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<b>Up/Down</b> (trampoline)<br>
 +
<ref>[http://muppet.wikia.com/wiki/Gymnast MuppetWiki entry on the Gymnast segments.] Retrieved 16 Sept ’16.</ref>
 +
==Other Noteworthy Sesame Street Clips==
 +
The following is a brief list of Sesame Street clips for which there are separate articles on this wiki:
 +
 +
Episodes:
 +
*[[Sesame Street "Episode 847" (lost "Wicked Witch of the West" episode of children’s educational TV series; 1976)]]
 +
*[[Sesame Street "Snuffy's Parents Get a Divorce" (lost episode of children's puppetry TV series; 1992)]]
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<br/>
 +
Sketches:
 +
*[[Cracks aka "Crack Master" (found animated Sesame Street short; 1975)]]
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*[[The Count Orders a Hot Dog (found Sesame Street sketch; 1973)]]
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*[[Handful of Crumbs (partially lost Sesame Street short; 1982)]]
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*[[Kermit's "Between" Lecture (partially lost Sesame Street sketch; 1970)]]
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*[[Sesame Street "Windy" (partially lost clip from episode of children's educational TV series; 1970)]]
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*[[Batman: Clean and Dirty (lost "Sesame Street" animated segment; 1970)]]
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*[[Ernie and the Pumpkin Seed Candy Salesman (found Sesame Street sketch; 1971)]]
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*Luxo, Jr. Shorts (mentioned in [[Pixar's Made in Point Richmond DVD Rarities (found various Pixar footage; 1986-2000)]])
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*[[Sesame Street "Surprise!" song by Hippies (partially lost clip from puppet show series; 1970)]]
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*[[Sesame Street "The Frazzle Song" (partially lost clip from puppet show series; 1976)]]
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<br/>
 +
Specials:
 +
*[[Sesame Street Jam: A Musical Celebration (found deleted scenes of TV special; 1994)]]
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*[[Out to Lunch (lost Sesame Street/Electric Company crossover special; 1974)]]
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*[[The Sesame Street Experiment (partially lost documentary based on children's educational TV series; 1989)]]
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*[[Sesame Street At Night? (lost Sesame Street television special; 1977)]]
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*[[The Grover Monster - Jean Marsh Cartoon Special (lost TV special; 1975)]]
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{{InfoboxLost
 +
|title=<center>The Muppets Ads</center>
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|image=ArnoldMunchosMonster.jpg
 +
|imagecaption=Screenshot of a Munchos commercial.
 +
|status=<span style="color:orange;">'''Partially Lost'''</span>
 +
}}
 +
Before ''Sesame Street'', Jim Henson made '''multiple commercials for various companies from 1962 to 1969, using his trademark Muppets as spokespeople'''. Before that, he made [[Wilkins and Wontkins (partially lost series of commercials; 1957-1969)|multiple commercials featuring his other Muppet characters, Wilkins and Wontkins]]. Some of these commercials were direct remakes of ''Wilkins and Wontkins'' commercials.
 +
 +
Most of these ads are Partially Found.
 +
==Commercials==
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===Billy, Sue, and Sneegle - Partially Found===
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In 1962, two series of productions were created by Jim Henson featuring two kids, Billy and Sue, and a pointy-headed monster, Sneegle. One series was commissioned by the National Council of Churches and made up of five-minute programs, and the other was commissioned by the Citizen's Advisory Committee on Highway Safety and was made up of 20-second ads.
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Nothing from either series aired, with the five-minute programs being scrapped due to test audiences paying more attention to the antics of the villainous Sneegle.<ref>[https://www.henson.com/jimsredbook/2013/06/6-1962-2/] Retrieved 31 Jul '19</ref>
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 +
It is unknown how many programs or commercials were made. No programs are known to survive, while only two of the twenty-second ads are known to survive, with one being uploaded onto YouTube.
 +
{{Video|perrow  =1
 +
  |service1    =youtube
 +
  |id1          =Jx_ys9yMcN4
 +
  |description1 =Billy, Sue, and Sneegle in "No Tailgating!".
 +
}}
 +
===On-Cor Frozen Foods - Lost===
 +
[[File:COM OnkyPhoto 1962 Ankers.jpg|240px|thumb|right|Image of one of the commercials.]]
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''On-Cor Frozen Foods'' is a frozen food brand that makes stuff such as meats and pasta.
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Three commercials were made in 1962, featuring the muppet Onky. None of the commercials have surfaced online, and it is unknown if they will ever surface.
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===Purina PetCare - Partially Found===
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''Purina PetCare'' is a company that specializes in dog food.
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Seven commercials were produced from 1962 to 1963, and 4 were released as bonus features on ''The Muppet Show: Season Three'' DVD box set. These commercials are notable for being the debut of the ever-popular Muppet, Rowlf the Dog.
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{{Video|perrow  =1
 +
  |service1    =youtube
 +
  |id1          =N1IumZv2fzU
 +
  |description1 =4 ''Purina Dog Chow'' commercials.
 +
}}
 +
===Chase Manhattan Bank - Lost===
 +
[[File:COM DonaLolaPuppet 02.jpg|240px|thumb|right|Doña Lola, a Muppet that appeared in the commercials.]]
 +
''Chase Manhattan Bank'' was a national bank in Puerto Rico, which was a merger between Chase National Bank, and The Manhattan Company.
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 +
Eight 20-second commercials were produced in 1963. According to ''Jim's Red Book'', the commercials were in Spanish, so the puppeteers had to lip-sync to a Spanish audio track.
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While it is currently unconfirmed, it is possible that one of these ads was uploaded to the official Jim Henson Company Twitter page.<ref>[https://twitter.com/hensoncompany/status/1059537197483753472 Possible ad for the Chase Manhattan Bank.] Retrieved 07 Nov. '18</ref>
 +
P
 +
===Marathon Oil - Partially Found===
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''Marathon Oil'' is an oil exploration and production company headquartered in Texas.
 +
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Jim Henson made a commercial for ''Marathon Oil'' in 1963 featuring two singing gasoline pumps. Two versions of this commercial are known to be made; a 60-second version and a 20-second version.
 +
{{Video|perrow  =1
 +
  |service1    =youtube
 +
  |id1          =yeMvb01BTIY
 +
  |description1 =The 60-second ''Marathon Oil'' ad.
 +
}}
 +
===Federal Housing Administration - Partially Found===
 +
[[File:FHA behind the scenes.jpg|240px|thumb|right|Behind the Scenes image for one of the commercials.]]
 +
The ''Federal Housing Administration'' (''FHA'' for short) is a United States government agency made to improve house standards.
 +
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Jim Henson produced nine commercials for the ''FHA'' between 1963 and 1969. Out of these, only six have made their way onto the internet.
 +
{{Video|perrow  =3
 +
  |service1    =youtube
 +
  |id1          =uoaxn5LgnKY
 +
  |description1 =Ad for the ''FHA'' (1/6).
 +
  |service2    =youtube
 +
  |id2          =F6RJV4VwAm8
 +
  |description2 =Ad for the ''FHA'' (2/6).
 +
  |service3    =
 +
  |id3          =
 +
  |description3 =
 +
}}
 +
{{Video|perrow  =3
 +
  |service1    =youtube
 +
  |id1          =8dWeMJMh1wI
 +
  |description1 =Ad for the ''FDA'' (3/6).
 +
  |service2    =youtube
 +
  |id2          =l1vQEwK5x58
 +
  |description2 =Ad for the ''FHA'' (4/6).
 +
  |service3    =
 +
  |id3          =
 +
  |description3 =
 +
}}
 +
{{Video|perrow  =3
 +
  |service1    =youtube
 +
  |id1          =zdkBIt9L1sw
 +
  |description1 =Ad for the ''FHA'' (5/6).
 +
  |service2    =youtube
 +
  |id2          =E4MZVS0mBJY
 +
  |description2 =Ad for the ''FHA'' (6/6).
 +
  |service3    =
 +
  |id3          =
 +
  |description3 =
 +
}}
 +
===Claussen's Bakery - Partially Found===
 +
''Claussen's Bakery'' is a historical bakery built in 1928.
 +
 +
Jim Henson made twenty-four commercials for ''Claussen's Bakery'' from 1964 to 1966. These commercials featured an early version of Kermit the Frog, as well as a new Muppet named Mack. Most of these commercials were direct remakes of ''Wilkins and Wontkins'' commercials. Out of these commercials, only three can be found online.
 +
{{Video|perrow  =3
 +
  |service1    =youtube
 +
  |id1          =SSC3ZjuuqlE
 +
  |description1 =Ad for ''Claussen's Bakery'' (1/3).
 +
  |service2    =youtube
 +
  |id2          =BVDkkmxu_Bk
 +
  |description2 =Ad for ''Claussen's Bakery'' (2/3).
 +
  |service3    =youtube
 +
  |id3          =onGI9bIrki4
 +
  |description3 =Ad for ''Claussen's Bakery'' (3/3).
 +
}}
 +
===Cloverland Dairy - Partially Found===
 +
''Cloverland Dairy'' is a company that produces dairy products.
 +
 +
In 1965, Jim Henson made three versions of one ''Cloverland Dairy'' commercial; one 10-second ad, one 20-second ad, and one 1-minute ad. This commercial featured a cow dancing over a farm singing a jingle about ''Cloverland Dairy''. Out of all of these commercials, only the 1-minute version can be found.
 +
{{Video|perrow  =1
 +
  |service1    =youtube
 +
  |id1          =soCHae6p198
 +
  |description1 =The 1-minute ad for ''Cloverland Dairy''.
 +
}}
 +
===Aurora Bath Tissue - Partially Found===
 +
''Aurora Bath Tissue'' was a brand of toilet paper made by the American Can Company.
 +
 +
Starting in 1965, Jim Henson made commercials for ''Aurora Bath Tissue'', which starred a fancy glove dancing on top of the product. It is currently unknown how many commercials Jim Henson made, but two commercials can be found on YouTube.
 +
{{Video|perrow  =2
 +
  |service1    =youtube
 +
  |id1          =Z3bO4DsEQKM
 +
  |description1 =Ad for ''Aurora Bath Tissue'' (1/2).
 +
  |service2    =youtube
 +
  |id2          =68MTvPlQi2s
 +
  |description2 =Ad for ''Aurora Bath Tissue'' (2/2).
 +
}}
 +
===C & P Telephone Co. - Partially Found===
 +
''C & P Telephone Co.'' was a brand name for four Operating Bell Companies.
 +
 +
Jim Henson made ten 10-second ads for ''C & P Telephone Co.'' from 1964 to 1965. These commercials featured a girl muppet named Suzy and Mack (who was previously used for ''Claussen's Bakery''). Out of these commercials, only three can be found.
 +
{{Video|perrow  =3
 +
  |service1    =youtube
 +
  |id1          =-lFDJTVvp8U
 +
  |description1 =Ad for ''C & P Telephone Co.'' (1/3).
 +
  |service2    =youtube
 +
  |id2          =jaUeRcYNfaw
 +
  |description2 =Ad for ''C & P Telephone Co.'' (2/3).
 +
  |service3    =youtube
 +
  |id3          =eyqAj6CbDgk
 +
  |description3 =Ad for ''C & P Telephone Co.'' (3/3).
 +
}}
 +
===La Choy - Partially Found===
 +
''La Choy'' is a brand name for canned Chinese food.
 +
 +
From 1965 to 1967, Jim Henson produced 11 ads for ''La Choy''. These commercials included a spokesperson named Mert and a dragon named Delbert the La Choy Dragon. Some commercials included a hand puppet version of Delbert, while others included a full-body puppet of Delbert. Out of these eleven commercials, only 6 have made their way online.
 +
{{Video|perrow  =3
 +
  |service1    =youtube
 +
  |id1          =ri60msnDXLA
 +
  |description1 =Ad for ''La Choy'' (1/6).
 +
  |service2    =youtube
 +
  |id2          =jtO3-usgkyA
 +
  |description2 =Ad for ''La Choy'' (2/6).
 +
  |service3    =youtube
 +
  |id3          =4bfdaR4xMeU
 +
  |description3 =Ad for ''La Choy'' (3/6).
 +
}}
 +
{{Video|perrow  =3
 +
  |service1    =youtube
 +
  |id1          =UvHYzoPbefE
 +
  |description1 =Ad for ''La Choy'' (4/6).
 +
  |service2    =youtube
 +
  |id2          =MzSYsl9sFLk
 +
  |description2 =Ad for ''La Choy'' (5/6).
 +
  |service3    =youtube
 +
  |id3          =l8fKzsWOmRs
 +
  |description3 =Ad for ''La Choy'' (6/6).
 +
}}
 +
===McGarry's Sausage - Partially Found===
 +
From 1965 to 1968, Jim Henson made eleven 10-second ads for ''McGarry's Sausage''. These commercials included Mack and Kermit (much like the ''Claussen's Bakery'' ads). Thirty scripts for ads were written, but only eleven were filmed. Out of these, only one can be found.
 +
{{Video|perrow  =1
 +
  |service1    =youtube
 +
  |id1          =fzTKFkMbqrM
 +
  |description1 =Ad for ''McGarry's Sausage''.
 +
}}
 +
===Southern Bread - Partially Found===
 +
From 1965 to 1966, Jim Henson made eight 10-second ads for ''Southern Bakeries''. These commercials were promoted by a southern colonel muppet, who would do just about anything for ''Southern Bread''. Three of the eight ads can be found online.
 +
{{Video|perrow  =3
 +
  |service1    =youtube
 +
  |id1          =Ob7ge1nc_-U
 +
  |description1 =Ad for ''Southern Bread'' (1/3).
 +
  |service2    =youtube
 +
  |id2          =XwOGQHA2nuE
 +
  |description2 =Ad for ''Southern Bread'' (2/3).
 +
  |service3    =youtube
 +
  |id3          =vSr2hlvaQSc
 +
  |description3 =Ad for ''Southern Bread'' (3/3).
 +
}}
 +
===Wilson's Meats - Partially Found===
 +
From 1965 to 1967, Jim Henson created twenty-four ads for ''Wilson's Meats''. These commercials included two muppets who were similar to that of Wilkins and Wontkins, Scoop and Skip. Out of these commercials, only 4 have made their way online.
 +
{{Video|perrow  =4
 +
  |service1    =youtube
 +
  |id1          =hYhiLbSfI68
 +
  |description1 =Ad for ''Wilson's Meats'' (1/4).
 +
  |service2    =youtube
 +
  |id2          =xplxM9b-ip8
 +
  |description2 =Ad for ''Wilson's Meats'' (2/4).
 +
  |service3    =youtube
 +
  |id3          =xQq03xqedc4
 +
  |description3 =Ad for ''Wilson's Meats'' (3/4).
 +
  |service4    =youtube
 +
  |id4          =2_IimtcP-rk
 +
  |description4 =Ad for ''Wilson's Meats'' (4/4).
 +
}}
 +
===American Oil/Standard Oil - Lost===
 +
[[File:COM JerryJerryDon 1966.jpg|240px|thumb|right|Behind the Scenes photo of the commercial, featuring Jerry Juhl, Jerry Nelson, and Don Sahlin.]]
 +
In 1966, Jim Henson created one 1-minute commercial for ''American Oil/Standard Oil'', which featured two robots named Charlie and Clyde. No videos of this ad have surfaced, the only proof being concept art, and a behind the scenes photo.
 +
===Kern's Bakery - Partially Found===
 +
''Kern's Bakery'' is a bread bakery based in Tennessee.
 +
 +
From 1965 to 1966, Jim Henson made twenty-four 10-second ads for ''Kern's Bakery''. These commercials were hosted by two muppets named Tommy and Fred. Four of the twenty-four commercials can be found on YouTube.
 +
{{Video|perrow  =4
 +
  |service1    =youtube
 +
  |id1          =E5kliaz1ePY
 +
  |description1 =Ad for ''Kern's Bakery'' (1/4).
 +
  |service2    =youtube
 +
  |id2          =B2L6dUR9rFg
 +
  |description2 =Ad for ''Kern's Bakery'' (2/4).
 +
  |service3    =
 +
  |id3          =
 +
  |description3 =
 +
  |service4    =
 +
  |id4          =
 +
  |description4 =
 +
}}
 +
{{Video|perrow  =4
 +
  |service1    =youtube
 +
  |id1          =6cn8TCdGrSQ
 +
  |description1 =Ad for ''Kern's Bakery'' (3/4).
 +
  |service2    =youtube
 +
  |id2          =i4hZfrtzyCg
 +
  |description2 =Ad for ''Kern's Bakery'' (4/4).
 +
  |service3    =
 +
  |id3          =
 +
  |description3 =
 +
  |service4    =
 +
  |id4          =
 +
  |description4 =
 +
}}
 +
===Royal Crown Cola - Partially Lost===
 +
''Royal Crown Cola'' (commonly known as ''RC Cola'') is a cola-flavored soft drink.
 +
 +
In 1966, Jim Henson created four 20-second commercials for ''Royal Crown Cola''. These commercials featured two birds; the Nutty Bird and the Sour Bird. The Nutty Bird would eventually become Big Bird, of ''Sesame Street'' fame. Most of these commercials can be found online, three out of four of them being found.
 +
{{Video|perrow  =2
 +
  |service1    =youtube
 +
  |id1          =jtId1k-sYfo
 +
  |description1 =Ad for ''Royal Crown Cola'' (1/3).
 +
  |service2    =youtube
 +
  |id2          =dFOu4-MAa3Q
 +
  |description2 =Two ads for ''Royal Crown Cola'' (2/3, 3/3).
 +
}}
 +
===Southern Bell Telephone - Partially Found===
 +
''Southern Bell Telephone'' was a Florida-based Bell Operating company.
 +
 +
From 1966 to 1968, Jim Henson produced five 10-second ads for ''Southern Bell Telephone''. These commercials included two muppets named Mack and Suzy, who also appeared in commercials for ''C & P Telephone Co.''. Only one of these five ads can be found on YouTube.
 +
{{Video|perrow  =1
 +
  |service1    =youtube
 +
  |id1          =PvN6S66epBI
 +
  |description1 =Ad for ''Southern Bell Telephone''.
 +
}}
 +
===Wheels, Flutes & Crowns - Found===
 +
''Wheels, Flutes & Crowns'' were a line of snack foods by General Foods Canada.
 +
 +
In 1966, Jim Henson produced a commercial for these snacks. However, the commercial went unaired. This commercial is notable for being the official debut of the ever-popular muppet, Cookie Monster. The ad can easily be found on YouTube.
 +
{{Video|perrow  =1
 +
  |service1    =youtube
 +
  |id1          =5QngRWeEJGo
 +
  |description1 =The ad for ''Wheels, Flutes & Crowns''.
 +
}}
 +
===Linit Fabric Finish - Partially Found===
 +
In 1967, Jim Henson made four commercials for the product ''Linit Fabric Finish''. These commercials were hosted by a spray can knight named Sir Linit. Some shots included him as a marionette, and some included him like a hand puppet. Only one out of the four commercials can be found.
 +
{{Video|perrow  =1
 +
  |service1    =youtube
 +
  |id1          =HxrZeD4XQXQ
 +
  |description1 =An ad for ''Linit Fabric Finish''.
 +
}}
 +
===Tastee-Freez - Partially Found===
 +
''Tastee-Freez'' is an ice-cream company founded in 1950.
 +
 +
In 1967, Jim Henson produced two commercials for ''Tastee-Freez''; a 1-minute ad and a 10-second ad. These included a boss and his helper Homer. Only the 10-second ad has surfaced.
 +
{{Video|perrow  =1
 +
  |service1    =youtube
 +
  |id1          =lLINKEMZpPA
 +
  |description1 =The 10-second ad for ''Tastee-Freez''.
 +
}}
 +
===Kenner's Easy Bake Oven - Partially Found===
 +
''Kenner Products'' was an American toy company. It’s products are now made by Hasbro.
 +
 +
In 1968, Jim Henson produced commercials for ''Kenner's Easy-Bake Oven''. These commercials included a girl and the Kenner Bird, whose puppet eventually became Little Bird on ''Sesame Street''. While it is currently unknown how many commercials were made, one of them can be found on YouTube.
 +
{{Video|perrow  =1
 +
  |service1    =youtube
 +
  |id1          =po3yc7-MgXM
 +
  |description1 =An ad for ''Kenner's Easy-Bake Oven''.
 +
}}
 +
===Monarch Margarine - Lost===
 +
[[File:COM 3252 monarchmargarine 01 lion.jpg|240px|thumb|right|Design for the lion muppet, who appeared in the commercial.]]
 +
In 1968, Jim Henson created a commercial for ''Monarch Margarine''. This commercial included an old lady muppet named Mrs. H, and a lion muppet. No videos have surfaced of this commercial. However, colour storyboards are known to exist.
 +
===Munchos - Partially Found===
 +
''Munchos'' are a potato snack made by Frito-Lay.
 +
 +
In 1969, Jim Henson produced three commercials for ''Munchos''. These commercials included a spokesperson named Fred, and a monster named Arnold. Arnold would eventually become Cookie Monster. Only two out of the three ads can be found.
 +
{{Video|perrow  =2
 +
  |service1    =youtube
 +
  |id1          =xF7BlsSzHVQ
 +
  |description1 =Ad for ''Munchos'' (1/2).
 +
  |service2    =youtube
 +
  |id2          =Lxc-jToQDCQ
 +
  |description2 =Ad for ''Munchos'' (2/2).
 +
}}
 +
===Sprint Chocolate Wafers - Lost===
 +
[[File:COM 5135 Sprint 1969.jpg|240px|thumb|right|Part of the script for the original version of the commercial.]]
 +
[[File:COM 3248 01.jpg|240px|thumb|right|Concept art for the humanoid muppet.]]
 +
''Sprint'' was a line of candy bars manufactured by Mars.
 +
 +
In 1969, Jim Henson made a commercial for ''Sprint Chocolate Wafers''. The original commercial would've used a two-headed creature, while the final version used humanoid muppets. No videos have surfaced of this commercial. However, concept art can be found.
 +
==Also See==
 +
[[Wilkins and Wontkins (partially lost series of commercials; 1957-1969)]]
 +
{{InfoboxLost
 +
|title=<center>Pokémon Learning League</center>
 +
|image=Mission_Guides.png
 +
|imagecaption=Pokémon Learning League's logo and Mission Guides.
 +
|status=<span style="color:orange;">'''Partially Found'''</span>
 +
}}
 +
The '''''Pokémon Learning League''''' was an educational web series that used characters from the Pokémon anime to teach students in the areas of science, math, language arts, and life skills. The site first launched in the fall of 2006 and was initially free to use, but on January 1st, 2007, the site’s content was only available to users with a paid subscription. On August 1st, 2008, the site stopped taking new subscribers, but continued to offer its services to existing subscribers until it was shut down at the end of the 2008-2009 school year.<ref>[https://bulbapedia.bulbagarden.net/wiki/Pokémon_Learning_League Bulbapedia's article on PLL] Retrieved 23 Nov '17</ref> Since then, the lessons featured on the site have become incredibly hard to find.
 +
==Lesson Structure==
 +
''Pokémon Learning League'' lessons were split into three segments, Watch, Try, and Apply. The Watch segment introduced the user to one or more characters from the ''Pokémon'' anime who have a problem. They would then use the PokéPilot to call one of the Mission Guides (a group of characters created specifically for the Pokémon Learning League) for help. The Mission Guide would then teach the characters (and in turn, the user) about the topic specific to that lesson.
 +
 +
Next came the Try segment. This segment was interactive and gave the user a practice problem to solve. The lesson’s Mission Guide would help guide the user through the problem, reinforcing the information discussed in the previous segment.
 +
 +
Finally, there was the Apply segment. In this segment, the user was given a problem to solve on their own, using the information taught in the previous two segments. Once this was completed, a short conclusion video would play, showing the characters solving their problem.
 +
 +
==Production==
 +
While ''Pokémon Learning League's'' brand direction and approvals came from Pokémon Japan, the site and its lessons were produced by third-party companies.
 +
 +
The ''Pokémon Learning League'' had its lessons planned, written, and animated by 360KID, a company that specializes in educational games and media for children. The ''Pokémon Learning League'' is still listed on their portfolio page, and their animation reel from 2012 shows a brief clip of Ash throwing a Pokéball. 360KID is also responsible for other projects that use the same lesson structure and interface as Pokémon Learning League, such as Professor Garfield.<ref>[http://360kid.com/portfolio.php 360KID's Portfolio Page] Retrieved 18 Jan '17</ref>
 +
 +
Two Animators! LLC was another company involved in ''Pokémon Learning League's'' production. They had provided vector art for many of the characters and even animated a few lessons themselves. They still have a page on their website dedicated to the ''Pokémon Learning League'', and they even show a short, muted clip of a lesson in their 2007 demo reel.<ref>[http://www.twoanimators.com/m/Pokemon.html Two Animator's Page on PLL] Retrieved 26 Jan '17</ref>
 +
 +
Finally, Entropy Multimedia was also involved in the site's production. While the other two companies handled the site’s front-end content (the lessons and user interface), Entropy was responsible for the providing the site’s back-end content (coding and maintenance).
 +
 +
==Availability==
 +
Since the site’s shutdown in 2009, ''Pokémon Learning League'' lessons have become incredibly hard to find. While the site can be accessed through the Wayback Machine, most of the site’s Flash content wasn’t archived. Since the series was created in Adobe Flash, none of the actual lessons are accessible.
 +
 +
Very few aspects of the ''Pokémon Learning League'' are known to be available online. One video, the Watch segment of the Water Cycle episode, was found on Newgrounds, with an upload date of March 28, 2008. Another video, the Watch segment from the How to Make Friends episode, was found on Comdotgame, though its upload date is unknown. However, the interactive segments for these episodes remain lost, and it is unknown if any other episodes are still available online.
 +
 +
On November 29th, 2017 The Watch segment of the Online Safety episode has been found, albeit in an edited state. It was uploaded to Newgrounds on February 10, 2009, but this version contained a few edits (Quinn wears a marijuana hoodie, NSFW images in the search results, etc). This video was further edited to undo most of the changes and resulted in a version that more closely resembled the original episode.
 +
 +
==Gallery==
 +
<gallery mode=packed heights=175px>
 +
File:PKLL_2.jpg|2007 Screenshot of the website
 +
File:2A!_Pokemon_02.jpg|Various assets created by Two Animators! LLC
 +
File:2A_Pokemon_Ash_02.jpg
 +
File:2A!_Pokemon_03.jpg
 +
</gallery>
 +
==Videos==
 +
{{Video|perrow  =3
 +
  |service1    =youtube
 +
  |id1          =QU3n7PzociY
 +
  |description1 =The Water Cycle Watch segment, mirrored on YouTube.
 +
  |service2    =youtube
 +
  |id2          =Wl1wWRON-n4
 +
  |description2 =How to Make Friends Watch segment, mirrored on YouTube.
 +
  |service3    =youtube
 +
  |id3          =j8JcRTq25mo
 +
  |description3 =Online Safety Watch segment, restored and mirrored on YouTube.
 +
}}
 +
==External links==
 +
*[https://web.archive.org/web/20070613173550/http://www.pokemonlearningleague.com:80/ The Archived Pokemon Learning League website.] Retrieved 23 Nov '17
 +
*[https://www.newgrounds.com/portal/view/432243?id=432243 Water Cycle video on Newgrounds.]  Retrieved 23 Nov '17
 +
*[http://www.comdotgame.com/play/how-to-make-friends How to Make Friends video on Comdotgame.]  Retrieved 23 Nov '17
 +
*[https://www.newgrounds.com/portal/view/482701 Online Safety on Newgrounds.]  Retrieved 29 Nov '17
 +
 +
{{InfoboxFound
 +
|title=<center>Chuggaconroy's Pokémon Platinum videos</center>
 +
|image=Chuggaaconroy_Pkmn_Platinum.jpg
 +
|imagecaption=Screenshot from video 44, showcasing Chuggaaconroy's battle against Cynthia.
 +
|status=<span style="color:green;">'''Found'''</span>
 +
|datefound=15 Jul '16
 +
|foundby=[https://www.youtube.com/user/chuggaaconroy Chuggaaconroy]
 +
}}
 +
Since 2008, Emiliano "Emile" Rodolfo Rosales-Birou (a.k.a. "Chuggaaconroy") has made a career doing Let's Plays (commentated walkthroughs of video games) and is currently one of the most famous internet personalities of the genre. Aside from regular playthroughs, his earlier videos sometimes consisted of one-offs, in which he would show single aspects of certain video games that caught his attention (i.e. cut footage from playthroughs, glitches, or limited edition DLC & offers). Among these one-offs was a '''series of 88 videos showcasing events in the Nintendo DS game ''Pokémon Platinum''''', recorded using a camcorder (as no capture cards for the Nintendo DS existed at the time). These videos showcased every major battle in the game, both with Pokémon trainers and Legendary Pokémon. Because ''Platinum'' had not been released in the United States at the time (the videos were recorded in 2008; ''Pokémon Platinum'' was released in the US in 2009), the footage used was of the Japanese version.
 +
 +
Uniquely, the most popular videos showcased a series of events that would allow one to encounter (and potentially capture) its various Legendary Pokémon, most notably Regirock, Regice, and Registeel. Said Pokémon were the secondary trio of Legendary Pokémon from the 2002/2003 Game Boy Advance games ''Pokémon Ruby & Sapphire'' and its 2005 re-release, ''Pokémon Emerald'', and could only be caught in ''Platinum'' through limited-edition downloadable content.
 +
 +
At some point, the videos were made private, causing them to be visible to only a select number of viewers, and they were eventually deleted. According to Chuggaaconroy in the December 18 announcement video for his 2015 ''Pokémon Platinum'' lets play, the videos were primarily made as a way of answering general questions about the game when it was still new and were a method of figuring out "what exactly [he] wanted to do in the way of videos." Because he was never too fond of how the videos turned out, he eventually deleted them, with his 2015 LP of the game being made to fulfill his wish of doing a proper playthrough of it.
 +
 +
The first of Chuggaconroy's videos to resurface was a mirror upload of his encounter with the rare Pokémon Rotom on August 6, 2011, by ChuggaaArchive. The next bout of recovery wouldn't occur again until June 18, 2015, when a YouTube user by the name of "AquaRing" created a playlist containing mirror uploads of five of Chuggaconroy's ''Platinum'' videos. The first three document his battle with Champion Cynthia, the fourth shows off the in-game Distortion World event, and the fifth his battle with the Legendary Pokémon Regigigas. The complete playlist can be seen [https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLnWG0W7dgSs-b7TYQa7-zFx85f2Sw3Oht here.] According to AquaRing, these five videos are the only ones that they were able to recover.
 +
 +
Despite Chuggaaconroy's dissatisfaction with the ''Platinum'' videos, he eventually reuploaded all 88 of them on his YouTube channel on July 15, 2016. According to his announcement of them on Twitter, he had decided to bring back the 2008 series due to strong fan demand, a move that was met with positive reception<ref>[https://twitter.com/chuggaaconroy/status/754028624785866752 Tweet saying that the videos are now reuploaded.] Retrieved 03 Mar '19</ref>. His complete playlist of this once-lost series can be seen [https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL_sYhAj0WXRMmJM2XYKaHVXaRBAxQc2UE here].
 +
 +
==Videos==
 +
{{Video|perrow  =2
 +
  |service1    =youtube
 +
  |id1          =tioycqgd7jI
 +
  |description1 =The announcement video for Chuggaaconroy's 2015 ''Platinum'' LP, in which he discusses the lost videos.
 +
  |service2    =youtube
 +
  |id2          =qlmTAj83WCY
 +
  |description2 =Mirror upload of the Rotom video from his 2015 Platinum series.
 +
}}
 +
==See Also==
 +
*[[Pokémon Crystal Version (lost Japan-only mobile adapter GB content for game; 2001-2002)]]
 +
*[[Pokémon Gold and Silver (found early Space World demo build of games; 1997)]]
 +
*[[Pokémon Picross (lost build of unfinished Game Boy Color puzzle game; 1999)]]
 +
*[[Pokémon Mystery Dungeon: Gold Rescue Team -Challenge the Gold Rank!- (lost South Korean promotional demo of Nintendo DS game; 2007)]]
 +
*[[Twitch Plays Pokémon (partially found footage of Let's Play channel; 2014)]]
 +
*[[Pokémate (inaccessible Japanese mobile phone app; 2006)]]
 +
*[[PokéPark: Asari Taikai DS (lost DS Download Play game; 2005)]]
 +
*[[Pokémon.com online games (lost online games; pre-2010 to 2011)]]
 +
*[[Pokémon 2000 Adventure Game (partially found browser-based online game; 2000)]]
 +
*[[Chuggaaconroy "Fifty Facts" (found list video by YouTuber; late 2000s)]]
 +
 +
{{InfoboxFound
 +
|title=<center>"Cream of the Croagunk Crop" (original Japanese airing)</center>
 +
|image=Croagunk crop japan.PNG
 +
|imagecaption=An unaltered still from the episode.
 +
|status=<span style="color:green;">'''Found'''</span>
 +
|datefound=04 Aug '15
 +
|foundby=''Unknown''
 +
}}
 +
When the ''Pokémon'' episode "Cream of the Croagunk Crop"<ref>[http://dogasu.bulbagarden.net/comparisons/diamond_pearl/ep082.html Dogashu's Backpack review on the episode that also mentions the original version of Hiroki.] Retrieved 03 Sept '18</ref> aired in Japan on June 5th, 2008, there was a character named Hiroki who was ultimately changed to prevent legal action being taken. In the '''original broadcast version''', he had green hair, eyebrows, head shape and large glasses similar to the protagonist of the show ''Dokonjo Gaeru''. His name was changed to Takuya on DVD releases and later airings, and his Croagunk's name, Gurekitchi, was changed to Gurekko. Also, one line the character said in the episode, "根性、根性、ど根性だ!" (Konjou, konjou, dokonjou da!, or "We've got guts! We've got guts! We're gusty!"), was changed to "燃えろ、燃えろ、燃えれ!" (Moero, moero, moere!, or "We're burning, we're burning, we're burning!"). These changes ultimately applied to the Japanese version, before being altered for the international release. No footage from the original version has surfaced.
 +
 +
On August 4th, 2015, the unaltered episode was found on a Chinese website called Letv.com.
 +
 +
==Gallery==
 +
<gallery mode=packed heights=175px>
 +
File:04hiroki small.jpg|Hiroki, from the original version.
 +
File:04takuya small.jpg|Takuya, from the altered version.
 +
</gallery>
 +
==See Also==
 +
*[[Pokémon "Computer Warrior Porygon" (lost unaired English dub of anime episode; 1998)]]
 +
*[[Pokémon "The Legend of Dratini" (non-existent unaired English dub of anime episode; 1997)]]
 +
*[[Pokémon "Battle Aboard the St. Anne" (found first American broadcast version of anime episode; 1998)]]
 +
*[[Pokémon "Battle of the Quaking Island! Barboach VS Whiscash!!" (partially found unaired episode of anime; 2004)]]
 +
*[[Pokémon "Rocket-dan VS Plasma-dan!" (partially found unaired two-part episode of anime; 2011)]]
 +
*[[Pokémon 3: The Movie (lost first draft of script of anime film; late 1990s)]]
 +
*[[Pokémon 3D Adventure: Mew o Sagase! (lost 3D short of anime; 2005)]]
 +
*[[Pokémon 4D: Pikachu's Ocean Adventure (partially found 4D short of anime; 2006)]]
 +
*[[Pokémon! I Choose You! (found original Japanese airing of anime series pilot; 1997)]]
 +
*[[Pokémon "It's New Year's Eve! Pocket Monsters Encore" (lost unaired special of anime series; 1997)]]
 +
*[[Pokémon "Pocket Monsters, Fall Special!" (found "clip show" episode of anime series; 1997)]]
 +
*[[Pokémon "Pocket Monsters, Winter Special!" (lost unaired "clip show" episode of anime series; 1998)]]
 +
*[[Pokémon Live! (partially found professional recording footage of musical; 2000-2001)]]
 +
{{NSFL}}
 +
{{InfoboxLost
 +
|title=<center>Chika Gentō Gekiga: Shōjo Tsubaki</center>
 +
|image=Shojotsubaki.jpg
 +
|imagecaption=Cover for the movie.
 +
|status=<span style="color:orange;">'''Partially Lost'''</span>
 +
}}
 +
In 1987, Hiroshi Harada, a Japanese storyboarder who worked for various animation studios under trade, began work on a self-funded anime adaptation of Suehiro Maruo's 1984 manga ''Shōjo Tsubaki.'' Harada had attempted to gain sponsors for his film, but nobody was willing to support it due to its graphic imagery. Because of this, Harada was forced to animate and fund the entire film by himself, with the exception of voice acting done by an unknown cast. The task was so painstaking, with reportedly over 5,000 sheets of animation of work that had to be done, that Harada did not finish producing the film until 1992.
 +
 +
The film, titled '''''Chika Gentō Gekiga: Shōjo Tsubaki''''' (地下幻燈劇画 少女椿 roughly meaning ''Underground Projected Drama: Camellia Girl''), also known as just '''''Midori''''', premiered on May 2nd, 1992 "inside a giant red tent inside the grounds of the Mitake Jinja Shinto shrine in Tokyo." The premiere version is widely reported to have been between 52 and 54 minutes in running time. Following the premiere of the film, Eirin, the Japanese film censor board, required 26 cuts to be made before the film could be more widely screened, due to the fact that the film contained scenes of sexual and physical abuse on a prepubescent girl by travelling carnies of a much older age. Some of these scenes even remained in the film after the cuts were made. Extreme levels of gore were also prevalent in the film, including a scene of animal abuse where a dog was stomped to death by one of the said carnies. While these scenes do exist in the currently surviving version, there were reportedly more graphic scenes that were shown at the original 1992 premiere. The post-censorship version of the film was reportedly later screened at more secretive venues, that required people to "read cryptic signs pointing to where the performance was being held, and patrons had to enter through dark labyrinths before getting to the actual venue."<ref>https://nergalheavyindustries.wordpress.com/2014/02/11/anime-dvds-you-may-have-missed-midori/</ref> However, in the late-1990s, the screening print would be sent overseas and be screened for the final time. When the film returned to Japan at Narita Airport, Japanese Customs agents intercepted it and destroyed it. Fortunately, at least one backup copy of the edited version of the film survived the late-90s.
 +
 +
When Harada was informed about this, he grew outraged and refused to allow further screenings of his film, even the cut version. In later years, Harada grew more lenient, eventually culminating in the French company Ciné Malta releasing a region 2 PAL DVD of the 48-minute edited version. The DVD includes six different languages of subtitles, including French, Spanish, German and English. However, bootleg VHS copies of what is believed to be the exact same source, if not the exact same transfer of said source that the 2006 DVD has, have circulated since the 1990s, and a rip of one of these bootlegs even exists on YouTube without any subtitles.<ref>[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WKfokE3CEyo A VHS rip of the circulated bootleg version.] Retrieved 09 Jun '15.</ref> However, a rip of the superior DVD of the film also exists on YouTube as of 2015.<ref>[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UxME8pxrKyQ A DVD rip of the 2006 PAL DVD.] Retrieved 09 Jun '15.</ref> Unfortunately, however, approximately six minutes worth of cut footage has not seen the light of day since approximately 1999.
 +
==References==
 +
{{reflist}}

Revision as of 18:12, 29 February 2020

Contents

Article on Myself

Nsfw.png


This article has been tagged as NSFW due to its Pornographic Subject Matter.



Em YouTube icon.jpeg

Em’s YouTube Icon.

Status: Lost

Em is a Canadian YouTuber from Nova Scotia, who currently has 54 Subscribers. He is a YouTuber who specializes in Lost Media Videos and Nostalgic Subject Matter. Outside of YouTube, he is a cartoonist working on his upcoming cartoon franchise, Citizens of Em Street. He is also, more notably, a Rule 34 Artist who posts his artwork to Paheal and Furaffinity.

Even though both Channels are currently up, Em has unlisted, privated, and deleted many of his old videos that either contain personal information about him, or that he thinks are below his quality standards. He also does the same thing on his Furaffinity Account.

Em’s Old Account

Em’s first Account uploaded its first video on September 26th 2016. The channel’s focus was Doll Videos for kids. His Fourth Doll Video was Unlisted because it showed his face in the end. Em unlisted Every video showing his face, in order to keep his anonymity. And changed the name of the channel to “This Channel is Inactive.” A Year after he stopped uploading, a new video was uploaded titled “Carrie’s Slime Video,” which was made by Em’s Younger Sister, whom he shares the channel with.

Em’s New Account

In 2018 Em uploaded an Animation titled “Emily the Rabbit vs The CTW.” It was a Slideshow, not an animation, and it featured Em’s Now-Retired Character Emily the Rabbit. When Emily the Rabbit was replaced with Josy the Rabbit (who would later be replaced with Javier Monotonious), and Em thought the video was crap, he deleted it. The Animation revolved around Emily the Rabbit demanding the Children’s Television Workshop make Bert and Ernie get married. Until Ernie appears, and says that he is actually in love with his Rubber Duckie.

Em also has a series titled “The Sotnem Recordings,” in which Em goes on pornographic cartoon websites (like 8muses or PalComix), and reads parody comics of cartoon characters, whether or not he likes them. He has currently made 5, but only 3 have been uploaded. Part 1 (Randall’s Revenge on Mentos), Part 2 (Simon is taken my Memesauce), and Part 4 (Mrs. Fiona Chupa-Chups). All of them have been deleted, Parts 1 and 4 were deleted by Em. While Part 2 was deleted by YouTube for having uncensored Nudity. Em has copies of Parts 1-3 and 5 but won’t release them on another site due to the first one being over one hour long (one of his few videos to reach that goal).

Status

All of Em’s Lost Videos are considered permanently Lost, as once Em uploads his videos, he almost never has back-up copies. Even if he did, they wouldn’t be uploaded either due to length, or content that violates YouTubes Terms of Service.

References

External Links

Other Random Articles

Curlyoftheapes.jpeg

Title card for the episode.

Status: Partially Found

The Robonic Stooges was an animated series created by Hanna-Barbara, that aired from 1977 to 1978. The show revolves around the popular slapstick comedy act, The Three Stooges (Moe Howard, Larry Fine, and Curly Howard), who are now robotic crimefighting superheroes. The entire series can be found online via full episodes on pirate websites and clips on YouTube, but one of the 32 episodes, "Curly of the Apes", is incomplete.

Plot

The premise revolves around The Robonic Stooges trying to stop an ivory poacher named "Tricker Mortis", who steals entire elephants. At one point in the episode, Curly ends up encountering some apes, hence the title. It’s not known how the episode ends, as the episode is not fully available.

Status

Only the first two minutes of the episode is available online. The Robonic Stooges never had a home media release, but the rest of the series is fully available from its reruns on Boomerang, which are viewable on the internet.

External Links

CG2.jpg

One of the remaining comics from Crazyghosts.

Status: Partially Found

Crazyghosts was a webcomic created by a man named Vincent Bailey around 2006 to 2007. The comic depicted the adventures of a cast of ghosts living together and getting into shenanigans, a majority of which take a sexual tone throughout the series. An example of some recurring characters is Death and Anola, where Death was a small black figure who tried to be serious in the situation and Anola was a large succubus with oversized thighs and breasts who is more laid back and fun. Exaggeration of the female body parts was common in the comics.

Status

Around 2015, Vincent disappeared from the internet, taking all of the webcomics with him. His Deviantart account, his own websites, and other places he uploaded the comics were all wiped. It is possible to use the Wayback Machine on these websites, but unfortunately, a lot of the photos on his websites have not been archive properly, and the Deviantart page would require a login to see the majority of the images that were posted.

Currently, a number of Crazyghosts comics can be found on Funnyjunk, Imagefap, and other image websites. The comic is considered partially found, and it’s unknown how many comics were made in total.

Gallery

File:Crazyghostscomic.jpeg
Another resurfaced comic.

Sources

SnelgroveSnail.png

Cover of the TV series.

Status: Partially Found

The Adventures of Snellgrove Snail is a 1979 Canadian puppet TV series. This series was created by D.W. Reid Film Company and was voiced by Helene Buwalda, Joyce Clarke, and Barrie McLean.[1] It originally debuted in Canada on CHCH-TV from September 22nd, 1979 until at least April 5th, 1980,[2][3] but it also aired in New Zealand on TVNZ and United States on syndication.[4] The series follows the underwater village of Snailsville and its gastropod inhabitants.[5]

On June 12th, 2018, a YouTube user going by the name AH2 AH2 uploaded two eight-minute low-quality recordings of two segments from the show, being "Nose for News" and "The Truth About Gossip." A poster on eBay reveals that there were a total of 130 half-hour episodes made, as well as 10 half-hour specials. On August 17th, 2018, LMW user Spacegerbil got into contact with the head puppeteer and puppet builder for the show, Tom Vandenberg, who unfortunately could not provide much information on the show.

On August 23rd, 2018, user TropesAreDangerous uploaded a VHS release titled "Too Many Cooks Snelgrove Snail" under YouTube username TheBoss and to the Internet Archive. This tape runs for 24 minutes and contains the segments "Too Many Cooks," "The Truth About Gossip," and "Nose for News," at roughly eight minutes each. This reveals that the half-hour episodes were actually pieced together from multiple segments and that the existing segments for "The Truth About Gossip" and "Nose For News" were complete. It is not known whether segments were reused for different episodes, or if each episode had all unique segments. If the segments are all unique, then this could translate to 390 individual segments for the regular episodes alone. However, the format for the 130 television series programs and ten specials is currently unconfirmed.

On August 24th, 2018, TropesAreDangerous uploaded a 42 minute VHS release titled "The Undersea Adventures of Snelgrove Snail: Muddy Gras in Snailsville" to YouTube under username TheBoss and the Internet Archive. It contained the aforementioned "Muddy Gras in Snailville," which was 24 minutes and is likely one of the ten special episodes. It also contained the sequences "Act with Tact" and "Mirror up to Life."

On September 4th, 2018, TropesAreDangerous uploaded a 24 minute (incorrectly labeled as "35 minutes") VHS release titled "It Takes All Kinds" to YouTube under the username TheBoss and the Internet Archive. It contained the segments "It Takes All Kinds," "Secret Admirer," and "Fishtory."

Known Segments

# Title Status
1 Too Many Cooks Found
2 It Takes All Kinds Found
3 Act With Tact Found
4 Mirror Up To Life Found
5 The Truth About Gossip Found
6 Nose for News Found
7 Secret Admirer Found
8 Fishtory Found

TV Specials

Title Status
Muddy Gras in Snailsville Found
Unknown Lost
Unknown Lost
Unknown Lost
Unknown Lost
Unknown Lost
Unknown Lost
Unknown Lost
Unknown Lost
Unknown Lost

Gallery

A VHS-rip of the show's opening sequence.
Poster revealing the count of episodes and specials. Courtesy of eBay seller papernostalgia).

External Link

Sazae.jpg

Cover image for the series.

Status: Partially Found

Sazae-san (サザエさん) is a long-running comedy anime series, adapted from Machiko Hasegawa’s comic strip of the same name. The series is noteworthy for being the longest-running animated series of all time, premiering on Fuji Television on October 5, 1969, and continuing up to the present day.

With well over 2,000 episodes and 7,000 segments, an overwhelming majority of the series is currently unavailable to watch in any form.[6][7]

Content and History

Sazae-san is a family-oriented slice-of-life series, centered on a Japanese housewife named Sazae Fuguta. Every episode is based on a small adventure from the simplistic daily lives of Sazae and her family. Each episode consists of 3 eight-minute segments, featuring relatively basic plotlines such as Sazae getting lost at the mall, or her brother Kazuo faking a stomach ache to stay home from school.

Aside from a few changes in design, the format of the series has remained largely unchanged since the manga began in 1946. As such, the setup is typically viewed as that of a “traditional” Japanese household and is currently regarded as a throwback to simpler times. The series has aired almost every Sunday night since its premiere in 1969 and is still extremely popular in Japan, continuing to pull the highest viewership of any animated series on Japanese television.

Availability

Despite Sazae-san’s popularity, only a small percentage of episodes have surfaced online. The most obvious reason for this is due to Machiko Hasegawa’s request that there be no home video releases of the series. Even after her death in 1992, her wish was honored, and to this day not a single episode has been released outside of TV broadcasts.

This, combined with the fact that most episodes air once and never again, and the fact that the series has been running since long before home taping became commonplace, means recordings of most early episodes are nonexistent outside of studio archives.[8]

However, even many modern episodes have not resurfaced online either, due to Fuji TV’s aggressive takedown orders and a lack of any serious preservation effort from fans.[9] The exact number of found segments is unknown and constantly changing; notably, a few early episodes have turned up after being re-aired in various anniversary specials. Aside from this, many episodes from the 2010s can be found on YouTube, but without any clear organization. Episodes from other eras appear to be few and far between.

Given the situation, it is extremely likely no full archive will ever exist, unless the rightsholders make the drastic decision to stop honoring Hasegawa’s request.

Other Adaptations

While the anime series is the most famous adaptation of the Sazae-san manga, it is not the only one, nor is it the first. The earliest known adaptation was a series of live-action movies released between 1948 and 1950, starring Tonko Azumaya as Sazae. The next adaptation was a radio drama which was broadcast in 1955, the same year that a short-lived live-action series aired on what later became TBS (Tokyo Broadcasting System). From 1956 to 1961, a series of 6 movies were made based on Sazae-san, all of which starred Chiemi Eri as Sazae.[10]

The following incarnation was another live-action television series on TBS, which ran from 1965 until 1967 and also featured Chiemi Eri. A biographical serial which depicted Hasegawa's life and the creation of Sazae-san was aired on NHK for 6 months in 1979.[11] Two more live-action series ran on Fuji TV from 1981-1985 and 1992-1996, starring Tomoko Hoshino and Atsuko Asano, respectively.[12] None of these adaptations are known to have resurfaced.

Most recently, a series of 3 live-action specials were broadcast on Fuji TV from 2009 to 2011, which starred Alisa Mizuki in the title role. All three have been uploaded to Japanese video-sharing site the Pandora.TV (albeit in low quality), and subsequently mirrored to YouTube. Interestingly, the third special has also been released on a bootleg DVD from Malaysia, marking what is possibly the only DVD release the franchise has ever seen.

The 2009 live-action special. (2010/2011)

External Links

SKsite.jpeg

A screenshot of Scribblekid’s website, where the animations were uploaded.

Status: Lost

Dave Cheung, a.k.a. Scribblekid is an artist known for the webcomics Chugworth Academy and U. S. Angel Corps. He also used to make Hentai Flash animations. After he abandoned his websites, many of these are now lost. While some of the flashes have been uploaded elsewhere, and many of Scribblekid's pictures have been preserved using the Internet Archive's Wayback Machine, many Flash animations and pictures are still missing.

Chugworth Academy: Pilot Episode

Possibly never even started, as it seems no material has ever been seen by the general public.[13]

Cumshots Collection: Vol 1[14]/Cumshots Col. #1[15]

As the title suggests, a collection of animations featuring three of Scribblekid's original characters receiving cumshots. Characters featured were Mia Uchiki, Emily Marshall, and Cacie Brennan.

LDS Vol. 1: Midnight Kiss

Possibly never completed, as it announced in 2002[16], but was only at 60% completion in 2003.[17] Scribblekid's description was as follows: "A short movie where young saucepot Keiren persuades the ever gullible Mia to do the dirty on him. I'm currently working away on this, so it should be ready in a few weeks. Stay glued to that TV Computer Screen !"

Dave Cheung has confirmed via a private message on Deviantart that this was never finished in animated form and he doesn't have any material from it anymore.

Mia Costume Box

Presumably a dress-up game featuring Scribblekid's original character Mia Uchiki.[18]

Emily Costume Box

Presumably, a dress-up game featuring Scribblekid's original character Emily Marshall.[19]

Cacie Costume Box

Presumably, a dress-up game featuring Scribblekid's original character Cacie Brennan.[20]


SS1969Cast.jpg

Cast photo from Sesame Street's first season.

Status: Partially Lost

Sesame Street is a children’s television series that started in 1969. The series is one of the most well-known and longest running children’s television series of all time. Since its inception in 1969, the show has earned 159 Emmy Awards and 8 Grammy Awards, and an estimated 77 million Americans watched the series as children as of 2008.

Despite its massive multi-decade running time, it’s become an interest of avid fans of the series to document the series in its entirety, including descriptions for shorts in episodes ranging from the first season to the present.

While episode listings adapted from Children’s Television Workshop archives are complete in writing, many of the segments included in the listings are not available for audiences on any home video releases or digital releases. A complete listing of these is not available, largely due to the vast number of episodes of the series produced, but many of the popular segments that have been lost and found since the genesis of the Internet have been listed below.

Aside from segments that are unavailable to the general populace, at least sixty episodes are missing from Sesame Workshop's archive.

Granny Fanny Nesselrode Skits - Partially Found

Granny Fanny Nesselrode is an early old lady Muppet performed by Caroll Spinney during Season 1, Season 2 and Season 3. Her character was best known for her "Answer Lady" skits, in which she attempted to solve viewers' problems but fails miserably. The program was broadcast from her cozy, sun-filled kitchen in Goat Corners, New Hampshire. She also appeared in the first "Here is Your Life" sketch from 1972, where she celebrates the life of Oak Tree, coming down the road from a farmhouse to visit and pay her respects to the tree, whom she planted in the ground since he was just an acorn, hence also bringing a picture of the acorn. In that sketch, she was performed by Jim Henson.

There are a total of six known Answer Lady sketches: "Pencil", "Household Hints", "Ketchup Problem," "Classifying Kittens," "Telephone," and "Alphabet." Of these six skits known to include her (not counting the "Here is Your Life: Oak Tree" skit that can be easily found all over a batch of episodes and even on Sesame Street's official YT channel), "Classifying Kittens" is the only Answer Lady skit to be found in English. "Telephone" has been found in German. Pictures of "Ketchup Problem" and "Alphabet" have been uploaded by Oscarfan on Muppet Wiki, and "Pencil" has not resurfaced in any form. JFriendsFan96's uploads of "Classifying Kittens" and "Telephone" have been deleted due to him closing his account. So, the 2 links have been replaced with Ezra Plays's upload of "Classifying Kittens" and BigSesameFan21541200462's upload of the German dub of "Telephone".

Classifying Kittens.
Telephone (German dub).
Here is Your Life: Oak Tree.

Professor Hastings Skits - Partially Found

Professor Hastings is an early Muppet professor performed by Frank Oz from the first three seasons. His character was best known for boring himself to sleep with his own lectures.

Screenshot of Letter Y skit
A fake screenshot of Letter Y skit, courtesy of Lost Media Wiki forums user Summertime.
Of the ten known skits to include him, the following is listed below:
  • Only one (What’s My Part?) has resurfaced in English.
  • Emotions have resurfaced in English (mostly fan-dubbed by a user but also using only a few actual English audio pieces taken from a documentary) with the video source deriving from the German dub.
  • Spinning Wheel has resurfaced in English but as incomplete (with the video starting halfway through the song, due to the only found VHS recording of the German dub from which it was audio-synced having missed the first half of the clip). However, the English version with the full uncut video clip had been on YouTube in 2006, but as usual, it had been long deleted.
  • Number 2's existence as a separate skit was rumored for many years, but this was debunked as the Number 2 skit actually turned out to be the same Dump Truck skit (thanks to a full episode guide for Episode 0141 that was recently added to Muppet Wiki via a trusted source) that had been found in Arabic.
  • Five other dubbed segments have resurfaced.
  • Letter Y was once posted on YouTube in German back in 2006 but has been long gone since and it is confirmed that Rohail Hashmi, tpirman1982 and other users do not have Letter Y saved on their desktops. On June 23, 2018, Lost Media Wiki forums user Summertime uploaded another screenshot of the letter Y segment, but as of 2019, this was discovered to be a fake screenshot due to a still of Hastings from a bad-quality video of the Emotions skit being photoshopped into the picture.[21]
  • The U Lecture skit was once posted on YouTube in German back in 2006, but as usual (along with all the other German Sesamstraße clips), it was pulled in February 2007 as a result of Viacom pulling 400,000,000 YouTubers and has not resurfaced ever since. From Episode 0297, it is basically a filmed version of the same song from The Muppet Alphabet Album, except that Kermit the Frog is in Ernie's place. Only the album track with Ernie has resurfaced.

UPDATE: The English version of "Exercise" has been found, and can be viewed on Muppet Wiki's Facebook page.

Screenshot (as uploaded by Scarecroe on Muppet Wiki) showing proof that Herbert, instead Hastings, was in the final footage.

Despite the 10 skits known to include him, the original drafted script for Episode 0138 actually contains a 3-part skit involving the ET word family, with Professor Hastings doing a lecture and Grover carrying the letters. Because of Hastings' appearance in the script, it was rumored for a little while that Hastings was in the filmed skit, but when Scarecroe recently started uploading screenshots of many long-unseen Classic Sesame Street episodes (especially for this skit) on Muppet Wiki during May of 2019, the rumor about Hastings' appearance in the final was debunked as it turns out he was replaced with Herbert Birdsfoot doing the lecture, while Grover remained intact.

Leslie Mostly Skits - Partially Found

Leslie Mostly is a short-lived Muppet from the eleventh and twelfth seasons. She was the host of “The Leslie Mostly Show,” a talk show host spoof series. Her segments are interviews with other Muppet characters, including The Amazing Mumford, Grover, Count von Count, Cookie Monster, Kermit the Frog, Guy Smiley, and the word “CASA.”

While most of Leslie Mostly's skits have been uploaded to YouTube in English, the Cookie Monster skit has been found in Castilian Spanish, and the Kermit skit has been found in Turkish. The Guy Smiley skit was once available on Verizon Wireless V Cast phones but is no longer available, making it the only one having not turned up online at this time. The uploaded clips can be viewed below.

The Amazing Mumford Interview.
Count von Count Interview.
Grover Interview.
CASA Interview.

Deena and Pearl Skits - Partially Found

Deena and Pearl are a Muppet duo from the twelfth season. They were seen in a total of four sketches on the show before disappearing. Their discontinuance is largely attributed to the similarity of their segments to those of Ernie and Bert.

The four sketches include Baby Deena, Toy Box, Underwater, and Pearl is Sick.[22] Of these, Baby Deena is the only sketch uploaded on YouTube in English (as “Play House”). Toy Box has been uploaded in Dutch. Underwater and Pearl is Sick has been posted in Castilian Spanish.

Baby Deena, also known as Play House.
Toy Box (Dutch dub).

Gymnast Segments - Partially Found

The Gymnast segments are a series of inserts including a female gymnast (with blonde hair and wearing a black leotard) demonstrating various concepts using various gym apparatuses - like pommel horses and uneven bars - in a darkened, nondescript location. Two of the seven inserts featuring this gymnast - Around and Between - have resurfaced on YouTube; the five that haven’t are:

Beginning/End (uneven bars)
Close To/Away From (rings)
Over/Under (pommel horse)
Slow (uneven bars - slow motion)
Up/Down (trampoline)
[23]

Other Noteworthy Sesame Street Clips

The following is a brief list of Sesame Street clips for which there are separate articles on this wiki:

Episodes:


Sketches:


Specials:


ArnoldMunchosMonster.jpg

Screenshot of a Munchos commercial.

Status: Partially Lost

Before Sesame Street, Jim Henson made multiple commercials for various companies from 1962 to 1969, using his trademark Muppets as spokespeople. Before that, he made multiple commercials featuring his other Muppet characters, Wilkins and Wontkins. Some of these commercials were direct remakes of Wilkins and Wontkins commercials.

Most of these ads are Partially Found.

Commercials

Billy, Sue, and Sneegle - Partially Found

In 1962, two series of productions were created by Jim Henson featuring two kids, Billy and Sue, and a pointy-headed monster, Sneegle. One series was commissioned by the National Council of Churches and made up of five-minute programs, and the other was commissioned by the Citizen's Advisory Committee on Highway Safety and was made up of 20-second ads. Nothing from either series aired, with the five-minute programs being scrapped due to test audiences paying more attention to the antics of the villainous Sneegle.[24]

It is unknown how many programs or commercials were made. No programs are known to survive, while only two of the twenty-second ads are known to survive, with one being uploaded onto YouTube.

Billy, Sue, and Sneegle in "No Tailgating!".

On-Cor Frozen Foods - Lost

Image of one of the commercials.

On-Cor Frozen Foods is a frozen food brand that makes stuff such as meats and pasta.

Three commercials were made in 1962, featuring the muppet Onky. None of the commercials have surfaced online, and it is unknown if they will ever surface.

Purina PetCare - Partially Found

Purina PetCare is a company that specializes in dog food.

Seven commercials were produced from 1962 to 1963, and 4 were released as bonus features on The Muppet Show: Season Three DVD box set. These commercials are notable for being the debut of the ever-popular Muppet, Rowlf the Dog.

4 Purina Dog Chow commercials.

Chase Manhattan Bank - Lost

Doña Lola, a Muppet that appeared in the commercials.

Chase Manhattan Bank was a national bank in Puerto Rico, which was a merger between Chase National Bank, and The Manhattan Company.

Eight 20-second commercials were produced in 1963. According to Jim's Red Book, the commercials were in Spanish, so the puppeteers had to lip-sync to a Spanish audio track.

While it is currently unconfirmed, it is possible that one of these ads was uploaded to the official Jim Henson Company Twitter page.[25] P

Marathon Oil - Partially Found

Marathon Oil is an oil exploration and production company headquartered in Texas.

Jim Henson made a commercial for Marathon Oil in 1963 featuring two singing gasoline pumps. Two versions of this commercial are known to be made; a 60-second version and a 20-second version.

The 60-second Marathon Oil ad.

Federal Housing Administration - Partially Found

Behind the Scenes image for one of the commercials.

The Federal Housing Administration (FHA for short) is a United States government agency made to improve house standards.

Jim Henson produced nine commercials for the FHA between 1963 and 1969. Out of these, only six have made their way onto the internet.

Ad for the FHA (1/6).
Ad for the FHA (2/6).
Ad for the FDA (3/6).
Ad for the FHA (4/6).
Ad for the FHA (5/6).
Ad for the FHA (6/6).

Claussen's Bakery - Partially Found

Claussen's Bakery is a historical bakery built in 1928.

Jim Henson made twenty-four commercials for Claussen's Bakery from 1964 to 1966. These commercials featured an early version of Kermit the Frog, as well as a new Muppet named Mack. Most of these commercials were direct remakes of Wilkins and Wontkins commercials. Out of these commercials, only three can be found online.

Ad for Claussen's Bakery (1/3).
Ad for Claussen's Bakery (2/3).
Ad for Claussen's Bakery (3/3).

Cloverland Dairy - Partially Found

Cloverland Dairy is a company that produces dairy products.

In 1965, Jim Henson made three versions of one Cloverland Dairy commercial; one 10-second ad, one 20-second ad, and one 1-minute ad. This commercial featured a cow dancing over a farm singing a jingle about Cloverland Dairy. Out of all of these commercials, only the 1-minute version can be found.

The 1-minute ad for Cloverland Dairy.

Aurora Bath Tissue - Partially Found

Aurora Bath Tissue was a brand of toilet paper made by the American Can Company.

Starting in 1965, Jim Henson made commercials for Aurora Bath Tissue, which starred a fancy glove dancing on top of the product. It is currently unknown how many commercials Jim Henson made, but two commercials can be found on YouTube.

Ad for Aurora Bath Tissue (1/2).
Ad for Aurora Bath Tissue (2/2).

C & P Telephone Co. - Partially Found

C & P Telephone Co. was a brand name for four Operating Bell Companies.

Jim Henson made ten 10-second ads for C & P Telephone Co. from 1964 to 1965. These commercials featured a girl muppet named Suzy and Mack (who was previously used for Claussen's Bakery). Out of these commercials, only three can be found.

Ad for C & P Telephone Co. (1/3).
Ad for C & P Telephone Co. (2/3).
Ad for C & P Telephone Co. (3/3).

La Choy - Partially Found

La Choy is a brand name for canned Chinese food.

From 1965 to 1967, Jim Henson produced 11 ads for La Choy. These commercials included a spokesperson named Mert and a dragon named Delbert the La Choy Dragon. Some commercials included a hand puppet version of Delbert, while others included a full-body puppet of Delbert. Out of these eleven commercials, only 6 have made their way online.

Ad for La Choy (1/6).
Ad for La Choy (2/6).
Ad for La Choy (3/6).
Ad for La Choy (4/6).
Ad for La Choy (5/6).
Ad for La Choy (6/6).

McGarry's Sausage - Partially Found

From 1965 to 1968, Jim Henson made eleven 10-second ads for McGarry's Sausage. These commercials included Mack and Kermit (much like the Claussen's Bakery ads). Thirty scripts for ads were written, but only eleven were filmed. Out of these, only one can be found.

Ad for McGarry's Sausage.

Southern Bread - Partially Found

From 1965 to 1966, Jim Henson made eight 10-second ads for Southern Bakeries. These commercials were promoted by a southern colonel muppet, who would do just about anything for Southern Bread. Three of the eight ads can be found online.

Ad for Southern Bread (1/3).
Ad for Southern Bread (2/3).
Ad for Southern Bread (3/3).

Wilson's Meats - Partially Found

From 1965 to 1967, Jim Henson created twenty-four ads for Wilson's Meats. These commercials included two muppets who were similar to that of Wilkins and Wontkins, Scoop and Skip. Out of these commercials, only 4 have made their way online.

Ad for Wilson's Meats (1/4).
Ad for Wilson's Meats (2/4).
Ad for Wilson's Meats (3/4).
Ad for Wilson's Meats (4/4).

American Oil/Standard Oil - Lost

Behind the Scenes photo of the commercial, featuring Jerry Juhl, Jerry Nelson, and Don Sahlin.

In 1966, Jim Henson created one 1-minute commercial for American Oil/Standard Oil, which featured two robots named Charlie and Clyde. No videos of this ad have surfaced, the only proof being concept art, and a behind the scenes photo.

Kern's Bakery - Partially Found

Kern's Bakery is a bread bakery based in Tennessee.

From 1965 to 1966, Jim Henson made twenty-four 10-second ads for Kern's Bakery. These commercials were hosted by two muppets named Tommy and Fred. Four of the twenty-four commercials can be found on YouTube.

Ad for Kern's Bakery (1/4).
Ad for Kern's Bakery (2/4).
Ad for Kern's Bakery (3/4).
Ad for Kern's Bakery (4/4).

Royal Crown Cola - Partially Lost

Royal Crown Cola (commonly known as RC Cola) is a cola-flavored soft drink.

In 1966, Jim Henson created four 20-second commercials for Royal Crown Cola. These commercials featured two birds; the Nutty Bird and the Sour Bird. The Nutty Bird would eventually become Big Bird, of Sesame Street fame. Most of these commercials can be found online, three out of four of them being found.

Ad for Royal Crown Cola (1/3).
Two ads for Royal Crown Cola (2/3, 3/3).

Southern Bell Telephone - Partially Found

Southern Bell Telephone was a Florida-based Bell Operating company.

From 1966 to 1968, Jim Henson produced five 10-second ads for Southern Bell Telephone. These commercials included two muppets named Mack and Suzy, who also appeared in commercials for C & P Telephone Co.. Only one of these five ads can be found on YouTube.

Ad for Southern Bell Telephone.

Wheels, Flutes & Crowns - Found

Wheels, Flutes & Crowns were a line of snack foods by General Foods Canada.

In 1966, Jim Henson produced a commercial for these snacks. However, the commercial went unaired. This commercial is notable for being the official debut of the ever-popular muppet, Cookie Monster. The ad can easily be found on YouTube.

The ad for Wheels, Flutes & Crowns.

Linit Fabric Finish - Partially Found

In 1967, Jim Henson made four commercials for the product Linit Fabric Finish. These commercials were hosted by a spray can knight named Sir Linit. Some shots included him as a marionette, and some included him like a hand puppet. Only one out of the four commercials can be found.

An ad for Linit Fabric Finish.

Tastee-Freez - Partially Found

Tastee-Freez is an ice-cream company founded in 1950.

In 1967, Jim Henson produced two commercials for Tastee-Freez; a 1-minute ad and a 10-second ad. These included a boss and his helper Homer. Only the 10-second ad has surfaced.

The 10-second ad for Tastee-Freez.

Kenner's Easy Bake Oven - Partially Found

Kenner Products was an American toy company. It’s products are now made by Hasbro.

In 1968, Jim Henson produced commercials for Kenner's Easy-Bake Oven. These commercials included a girl and the Kenner Bird, whose puppet eventually became Little Bird on Sesame Street. While it is currently unknown how many commercials were made, one of them can be found on YouTube.

An ad for Kenner's Easy-Bake Oven.

Monarch Margarine - Lost

Design for the lion muppet, who appeared in the commercial.

In 1968, Jim Henson created a commercial for Monarch Margarine. This commercial included an old lady muppet named Mrs. H, and a lion muppet. No videos have surfaced of this commercial. However, colour storyboards are known to exist.

Munchos - Partially Found

Munchos are a potato snack made by Frito-Lay.

In 1969, Jim Henson produced three commercials for Munchos. These commercials included a spokesperson named Fred, and a monster named Arnold. Arnold would eventually become Cookie Monster. Only two out of the three ads can be found.

Ad for Munchos (1/2).
Ad for Munchos (2/2).

Sprint Chocolate Wafers - Lost

Part of the script for the original version of the commercial.
Concept art for the humanoid muppet.

Sprint was a line of candy bars manufactured by Mars.

In 1969, Jim Henson made a commercial for Sprint Chocolate Wafers. The original commercial would've used a two-headed creature, while the final version used humanoid muppets. No videos have surfaced of this commercial. However, concept art can be found.

Also See

Wilkins and Wontkins (partially lost series of commercials; 1957-1969)

Mission Guides.png

Pokémon Learning League's logo and Mission Guides.

Status: Partially Found

The Pokémon Learning League was an educational web series that used characters from the Pokémon anime to teach students in the areas of science, math, language arts, and life skills. The site first launched in the fall of 2006 and was initially free to use, but on January 1st, 2007, the site’s content was only available to users with a paid subscription. On August 1st, 2008, the site stopped taking new subscribers, but continued to offer its services to existing subscribers until it was shut down at the end of the 2008-2009 school year.[26] Since then, the lessons featured on the site have become incredibly hard to find.

Lesson Structure

Pokémon Learning League lessons were split into three segments, Watch, Try, and Apply. The Watch segment introduced the user to one or more characters from the Pokémon anime who have a problem. They would then use the PokéPilot to call one of the Mission Guides (a group of characters created specifically for the Pokémon Learning League) for help. The Mission Guide would then teach the characters (and in turn, the user) about the topic specific to that lesson.

Next came the Try segment. This segment was interactive and gave the user a practice problem to solve. The lesson’s Mission Guide would help guide the user through the problem, reinforcing the information discussed in the previous segment.

Finally, there was the Apply segment. In this segment, the user was given a problem to solve on their own, using the information taught in the previous two segments. Once this was completed, a short conclusion video would play, showing the characters solving their problem.

Production

While Pokémon Learning League's brand direction and approvals came from Pokémon Japan, the site and its lessons were produced by third-party companies.

The Pokémon Learning League had its lessons planned, written, and animated by 360KID, a company that specializes in educational games and media for children. The Pokémon Learning League is still listed on their portfolio page, and their animation reel from 2012 shows a brief clip of Ash throwing a Pokéball. 360KID is also responsible for other projects that use the same lesson structure and interface as Pokémon Learning League, such as Professor Garfield.[27]

Two Animators! LLC was another company involved in Pokémon Learning League's production. They had provided vector art for many of the characters and even animated a few lessons themselves. They still have a page on their website dedicated to the Pokémon Learning League, and they even show a short, muted clip of a lesson in their 2007 demo reel.[28]

Finally, Entropy Multimedia was also involved in the site's production. While the other two companies handled the site’s front-end content (the lessons and user interface), Entropy was responsible for the providing the site’s back-end content (coding and maintenance).

Availability

Since the site’s shutdown in 2009, Pokémon Learning League lessons have become incredibly hard to find. While the site can be accessed through the Wayback Machine, most of the site’s Flash content wasn’t archived. Since the series was created in Adobe Flash, none of the actual lessons are accessible.

Very few aspects of the Pokémon Learning League are known to be available online. One video, the Watch segment of the Water Cycle episode, was found on Newgrounds, with an upload date of March 28, 2008. Another video, the Watch segment from the How to Make Friends episode, was found on Comdotgame, though its upload date is unknown. However, the interactive segments for these episodes remain lost, and it is unknown if any other episodes are still available online.

On November 29th, 2017 The Watch segment of the Online Safety episode has been found, albeit in an edited state. It was uploaded to Newgrounds on February 10, 2009, but this version contained a few edits (Quinn wears a marijuana hoodie, NSFW images in the search results, etc). This video was further edited to undo most of the changes and resulted in a version that more closely resembled the original episode.

Gallery

Videos

The Water Cycle Watch segment, mirrored on YouTube.
How to Make Friends Watch segment, mirrored on YouTube.
Online Safety Watch segment, restored and mirrored on YouTube.

External links


Chuggaaconroy Pkmn Platinum.jpg

Screenshot from video 44, showcasing Chuggaaconroy's battle against Cynthia.

Status: Found

Date found: 15 Jul '16

Found by: Chuggaaconroy

Since 2008, Emiliano "Emile" Rodolfo Rosales-Birou (a.k.a. "Chuggaaconroy") has made a career doing Let's Plays (commentated walkthroughs of video games) and is currently one of the most famous internet personalities of the genre. Aside from regular playthroughs, his earlier videos sometimes consisted of one-offs, in which he would show single aspects of certain video games that caught his attention (i.e. cut footage from playthroughs, glitches, or limited edition DLC & offers). Among these one-offs was a series of 88 videos showcasing events in the Nintendo DS game Pokémon Platinum, recorded using a camcorder (as no capture cards for the Nintendo DS existed at the time). These videos showcased every major battle in the game, both with Pokémon trainers and Legendary Pokémon. Because Platinum had not been released in the United States at the time (the videos were recorded in 2008; Pokémon Platinum was released in the US in 2009), the footage used was of the Japanese version.

Uniquely, the most popular videos showcased a series of events that would allow one to encounter (and potentially capture) its various Legendary Pokémon, most notably Regirock, Regice, and Registeel. Said Pokémon were the secondary trio of Legendary Pokémon from the 2002/2003 Game Boy Advance games Pokémon Ruby & Sapphire and its 2005 re-release, Pokémon Emerald, and could only be caught in Platinum through limited-edition downloadable content.

At some point, the videos were made private, causing them to be visible to only a select number of viewers, and they were eventually deleted. According to Chuggaaconroy in the December 18 announcement video for his 2015 Pokémon Platinum lets play, the videos were primarily made as a way of answering general questions about the game when it was still new and were a method of figuring out "what exactly [he] wanted to do in the way of videos." Because he was never too fond of how the videos turned out, he eventually deleted them, with his 2015 LP of the game being made to fulfill his wish of doing a proper playthrough of it.

The first of Chuggaconroy's videos to resurface was a mirror upload of his encounter with the rare Pokémon Rotom on August 6, 2011, by ChuggaaArchive. The next bout of recovery wouldn't occur again until June 18, 2015, when a YouTube user by the name of "AquaRing" created a playlist containing mirror uploads of five of Chuggaconroy's Platinum videos. The first three document his battle with Champion Cynthia, the fourth shows off the in-game Distortion World event, and the fifth his battle with the Legendary Pokémon Regigigas. The complete playlist can be seen here. According to AquaRing, these five videos are the only ones that they were able to recover.

Despite Chuggaaconroy's dissatisfaction with the Platinum videos, he eventually reuploaded all 88 of them on his YouTube channel on July 15, 2016. According to his announcement of them on Twitter, he had decided to bring back the 2008 series due to strong fan demand, a move that was met with positive reception[29]. His complete playlist of this once-lost series can be seen here.

Videos

The announcement video for Chuggaaconroy's 2015 Platinum LP, in which he discusses the lost videos.
Mirror upload of the Rotom video from his 2015 Platinum series.

See Also


Croagunk crop japan.PNG

An unaltered still from the episode.

Status: Found

Date found: 04 Aug '15

Found by: Unknown

When the Pokémon episode "Cream of the Croagunk Crop"[30] aired in Japan on June 5th, 2008, there was a character named Hiroki who was ultimately changed to prevent legal action being taken. In the original broadcast version, he had green hair, eyebrows, head shape and large glasses similar to the protagonist of the show Dokonjo Gaeru. His name was changed to Takuya on DVD releases and later airings, and his Croagunk's name, Gurekitchi, was changed to Gurekko. Also, one line the character said in the episode, "根性、根性、ど根性だ!" (Konjou, konjou, dokonjou da!, or "We've got guts! We've got guts! We're gusty!"), was changed to "燃えろ、燃えろ、燃えれ!" (Moero, moero, moere!, or "We're burning, we're burning, we're burning!"). These changes ultimately applied to the Japanese version, before being altered for the international release. No footage from the original version has surfaced.

On August 4th, 2015, the unaltered episode was found on a Chinese website called Letv.com.

Gallery

See Also

Nsfl.png


This article has been tagged as NSFL due to its disturbing subject matter.



Shojotsubaki.jpg

Cover for the movie.

Status: Partially Lost

In 1987, Hiroshi Harada, a Japanese storyboarder who worked for various animation studios under trade, began work on a self-funded anime adaptation of Suehiro Maruo's 1984 manga Shōjo Tsubaki. Harada had attempted to gain sponsors for his film, but nobody was willing to support it due to its graphic imagery. Because of this, Harada was forced to animate and fund the entire film by himself, with the exception of voice acting done by an unknown cast. The task was so painstaking, with reportedly over 5,000 sheets of animation of work that had to be done, that Harada did not finish producing the film until 1992.

The film, titled Chika Gentō Gekiga: Shōjo Tsubaki (地下幻燈劇画 少女椿 roughly meaning Underground Projected Drama: Camellia Girl), also known as just Midori, premiered on May 2nd, 1992 "inside a giant red tent inside the grounds of the Mitake Jinja Shinto shrine in Tokyo." The premiere version is widely reported to have been between 52 and 54 minutes in running time. Following the premiere of the film, Eirin, the Japanese film censor board, required 26 cuts to be made before the film could be more widely screened, due to the fact that the film contained scenes of sexual and physical abuse on a prepubescent girl by travelling carnies of a much older age. Some of these scenes even remained in the film after the cuts were made. Extreme levels of gore were also prevalent in the film, including a scene of animal abuse where a dog was stomped to death by one of the said carnies. While these scenes do exist in the currently surviving version, there were reportedly more graphic scenes that were shown at the original 1992 premiere. The post-censorship version of the film was reportedly later screened at more secretive venues, that required people to "read cryptic signs pointing to where the performance was being held, and patrons had to enter through dark labyrinths before getting to the actual venue."[31] However, in the late-1990s, the screening print would be sent overseas and be screened for the final time. When the film returned to Japan at Narita Airport, Japanese Customs agents intercepted it and destroyed it. Fortunately, at least one backup copy of the edited version of the film survived the late-90s.

When Harada was informed about this, he grew outraged and refused to allow further screenings of his film, even the cut version. In later years, Harada grew more lenient, eventually culminating in the French company Ciné Malta releasing a region 2 PAL DVD of the 48-minute edited version. The DVD includes six different languages of subtitles, including French, Spanish, German and English. However, bootleg VHS copies of what is believed to be the exact same source, if not the exact same transfer of said source that the 2006 DVD has, have circulated since the 1990s, and a rip of one of these bootlegs even exists on YouTube without any subtitles.[32] However, a rip of the superior DVD of the film also exists on YouTube as of 2015.[33] Unfortunately, however, approximately six minutes worth of cut footage has not seen the light of day since approximately 1999.

References

  1. TVArchive Canada article on the show. Retrieved 12 Mar '17.
  2. Page 93 from The Ottawa Journal which mentions the show. Retrieved 15 Mar '17.
  3. Page 89 of The Ottawa Journal mentioning the show. Retrieved 15 Mar '17.
  4. Page 11 of the October 11th, 1980 edition of the Titusville Herald, which mentions the show. Retrieved 15 Mar '17.
  5. BuddyTV overview of The Adventures of Snellgrove Snail. Retrieved 12 Mar '17.
  6. Japan Today news page on the series entering Guinness World Records Retrieved 11 Feb '17.
  7. Anime News Network page for the show Retrieved 11 Feb '17.
  8. Cartoon Research article on the show Retrieved 11 Feb '17.
  9. Forum post describing the show's international obscurity Retrieved 11 Feb '17.
  10. Article on the series from the International Institute for Children's Literature, Osaka Retrieved 11 Feb '17.
  11. Google Books excerpt of The Anime Encyclopedia Retrieved 11 Feb '17.
  12. ANN news item announcing the third special Retrieved 11 Feb '17.
  13. Chugworth Academy: Pilot Episode at Scribblekid.org (archived). Retrieved 15 Oct '15.
  14. Cumshots Collection: Vol 1 at Scribblekid.org (archived). Retrieved 15 Oct '15.
  15. Cumshots Col. #1 at Scribblekid.org (archived). Retrieved 15 Oct '15.
  16. LDS Vol. 1: Midnight Kiss at Scribblekid.org (archived). Retrieved 15 Oct '15.
  17. LDS Vol. 1: Midnight Kiss at Scribblekid.org (archived). Retrieved 15 Oct '15.
  18. Mia Costume Box at Scribblekid.org (archived). Retrieved 15 Oct '15.
  19. Emily Costume Box at Scribblekid.org (archived). Retrieved 15 Oct '15.
  20. Cacie Costume Box at Scribblekid.org (archived). Retrieved 15 Oct '15.
  21. Forum post for a screenshot of the Professor Hastings Letter Y skit.
  22. MuppetWiki entry on Deena and Pearl. Retrieved 16 Sept ’16.
  23. MuppetWiki entry on the Gymnast segments. Retrieved 16 Sept ’16.
  24. [1] Retrieved 31 Jul '19
  25. Possible ad for the Chase Manhattan Bank. Retrieved 07 Nov. '18
  26. Bulbapedia's article on PLL Retrieved 23 Nov '17
  27. 360KID's Portfolio Page Retrieved 18 Jan '17
  28. Two Animator's Page on PLL Retrieved 26 Jan '17
  29. Tweet saying that the videos are now reuploaded. Retrieved 03 Mar '19
  30. Dogashu's Backpack review on the episode that also mentions the original version of Hiroki. Retrieved 03 Sept '18
  31. https://nergalheavyindustries.wordpress.com/2014/02/11/anime-dvds-you-may-have-missed-midori/
  32. A VHS rip of the circulated bootleg version. Retrieved 09 Jun '15.
  33. A DVD rip of the 2006 PAL DVD. Retrieved 09 Jun '15.