Difference between revisions of "User: Em the LMW fan/Testpage"

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=Template Test=
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{| class="wikitable"
 +
|-
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! style="padding: 0px 8px" colspan="2" rowspan="2" |Season
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! style="padding: 0px 8px" rowspan="2" |Episodes
 +
! style="padding: 0px 8px" colspan="2" |Originally aired
 +
|-
 +
! style="padding: 0px 8px"|Season premiere
 +
! style="padding: 0px 8px"|Season finale
 +
|-
 +
|bgcolor="ffffff" height="10px"|
 +
|align="center"| '''[[Citizens of Em Street (Pilot Season)|Pilots]]'''
 +
|align="center"| 8-10
 +
|align="center"| TBA
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|align="center"| TBA
 +
|-
 +
|bgcolor="8200ff" height="10px"|
 +
|align="center"| '''[[Citizens of Em Street (Season 1)|1]]'''
 +
|align="center"| 10-100
 +
|align="center"| TBA
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|align="center"| TBA
 +
|-
 +
|bgcolor="D1EDF1" height="10px"|
 +
|align="center"| '''[[Citizens of Em Street (Season 2)|2]]'''
 +
|align="center"| 10-100
 +
|align="center"| TBA
 +
|align="center"| TBA
 +
|-
 +
|bgcolor="D3A7CB" height="10px"|
 +
|align="center"| '''[[Citizens of Em Street (Season 3)|3]]'''
 +
|align="center"| 10-100
 +
|align="center"| TBA
 +
|align="center"| TBA
 +
|-
 +
|bgcolor="0067AA" height="10px"|
 +
|align="center"| '''[[Citizens of Em Street (Season 4)|4]]'''
 +
|align="center"| 10-100
 +
|align="center"| TBA
 +
|align="center"| TBA
 +
|-
 +
|bgcolor="D3212D" height="10px"|
 +
|align="center"| '''[[Citizens of Em Street (Season 5)|5]]'''
 +
|align="center"| 10-100
 +
|align="center"| TBA
 +
|align="center"| TBA
 +
|-
 +
|bgcolor="525355" height="10px"|
 +
|align="center"| '''[[Citizens of Em Street (Season 6)|6]]'''
 +
|align="center"| 10-100
 +
|align="center"| TBA
 +
|align="center"| TBA
 +
|-
 +
|bgcolor="660099" height="10px"|
 +
|align="center"| '''[[Citizens of Em Street (Season 7)|7]]'''
 +
|align="center"| 10-100
 +
|align="center"| TBA
 +
|align="center"| TBA
 +
|-
 +
|bgcolor="5198AA" height="10px"|
 +
|align="center"| '''[[Citizens of Em Street (Season 8)|8]]'''
 +
|align="center"| 10-100
 +
|align="center"| TBA
 +
|align="center"| TBA
 +
|-
 +
|bgcolor="7F305F" height="10px"|
 +
|align="center"| '''[[Citizens of Em Street (Season 9)|9]]'''
 +
|align="center"| 10-100
 +
|align="center"| TBA
 +
|align="center"| TBA
 +
|-
 +
|bgcolor="967E40" height="10px"|
 +
|align="center"| '''[[Citizens of Em Street (Season 10)|10]]'''
 +
|align="center"| 10-100
 +
|align="center"| TBA
 +
|align="center"| TBA
 +
|-
 +
|bgcolor="2affbf" height="10px"|
 +
|align="center"| '''[[Citizens of Em Street (Season 11)|11]]'''
 +
|align="center"| 10-100
 +
|align="center"| TBA
 +
|align="center"| TBA
 +
|-
 +
|bgcolor="b55ca7" height="10px"|
 +
|align="center"| '''[[Citizens of Em Street (Season 12)|12]]'''
 +
|align="center"| 10-100
 +
|align="center"| TBA
 +
|align="center"| TBA
 +
|-
 +
|bgcolor="ab68ff" height="10px"|
 +
|align="center"| '''[[Citizens of Em Street (Season 13)|13]]'''
 +
|align="center"| 10-100
 +
|align="center"| TBA
 +
|align="center"| TBA
 +
|-
 +
|bgcolor="db7676" height="10px"|
 +
|align="center"| '''[[Citizens of Em Street (Season 14)|14]]'''
 +
|align="center"| 10-100
 +
|align="center"| TBA
 +
|align="center"| TBA
 +
|-
 +
|bgcolor="10bdd2" height="10px"|
 +
|align="center"| '''[[Citizens of Em Street (Season 15)|15]]'''
 +
|align="center"| 10-100
 +
|align="center"| TBA
 +
|align="center"| TBA
 +
|-
 +
|bgcolor="ff7a00" height="10px"|
 +
|align="center"| '''[[Citizens of Em Street (Season 16)|16]]'''
 +
|align="center"| 10-100
 +
|align="center"| TBA
 +
|align="center"| TBA
 +
|-
 +
|bgcolor="ff0088" height="10px"|
 +
|align="center"| '''[[Citizens of Em Street (Season 17)|17]]'''
 +
|align="center"| 10-100
 +
|align="center"| TBA
 +
|align="center"| TBA
 +
|-
 +
|bgcolor="7c8571" height="10px"|
 +
|align="center"| '''[[Citizens of Em Street (Season 18)|18]]'''
 +
|align="center"| 10-100
 +
|align="center"| TBA
 +
|align="center"| TBA
 +
|-
 +
|bgcolor="a1b4ff" height="10px"|
 +
|align="center"| '''[[Citizens of Em Street (Season 19)|19]]'''
 +
|align="center"| 10-100
 +
|align="center"| TBA
 +
|align="center"| TBA
 +
|-
 +
|bgcolor="baff42" height="10px"|
 +
|align="center"| '''[[Citizens of Em Street (Season 20)|20]]'''
 +
|align="center"| 10-100
 +
|align="center"| TBA
 +
|align="center"| TBA
 +
|-
 +
|bgcolor="008000" height="10px"|
 +
|align="center"| '''[[Citizens of Em Street (Season 21)|21]]'''
 +
|align="center"| 10-100
 +
|align="center"| TBA
 +
|align="center"| TBA
 +
|-
 +
|bgcolor="d27a00" height="10px"|
 +
|align="center"| '''[[Citizens of Em Street (Season 22)|22]]'''
 +
|align="center"| 10-100
 +
|align="center"| TBA
 +
|align="center"| TBA
 +
|-
 +
|bgcolor="dd2277" height="10px"|
 +
|align="center"| '''[[Citizens of Em Street (Season 23)|23]]'''
 +
|align="center"| 10-100
 +
|align="center"| TBA
 +
|align="center"| TBA
 +
|-
 +
|bgcolor="227777" height="10px"|
 +
|align="center"| '''[[Citizens of Em Street (Season 24)|24]]'''
 +
|align="center"| 10-100
 +
|align="center"| TBA
 +
|align="center"| TBA
 +
|-
 +
|bgcolor="ceafe8" height="10px"|
 +
|align="center"| '''[[Citizens of Em Street (Season 25)|25]]'''
 +
|align="center"| 10-100
 +
|align="center"| TBA
 +
|align="center"| TBA
 +
|-
 +
|bgcolor="808080" height="10px"|
 +
|align="center"| '''[[Citizens of Em Street (Season 26)|26]]'''
 +
|align="center"| 10-100
 +
|align="center"| TBA
 +
|align="center"| TBA
 +
|-
 +
|bgcolor="ffee8" height="10px"|
 +
|align="center"| '''[[Citizens of Em Street (Season 27)|27]]'''
 +
|align="center"| 10-100
 +
|align="center"| TBA
 +
|align="center"| TBA
 +
|-
 +
|bgcolor="1a6513" height="10px"|
 +
|align="center"| '''[[Citizens of Em Street (Season 28)|28]]'''
 +
|align="center"| 10-100
 +
|align="center"| TBA
 +
|align="center"| TBA
 +
 +
|-
 +
|bgcolor="006499" height="10px"|
 +
|align="center"| '''[[Citizens of Em Street (Season 29)|29]]'''
 +
|align="center"| 10-100
 +
|align="center"| TBA
 +
|align="center"| TBA
 +
|-
 +
|bgcolor="780000" height="10px"|
 +
|align="center"| '''[[Citizens of Em Street (Season 30)|30]]'''
 +
|align="center"| 10-100
 +
|align="center"| TBA
 +
|align="center"| TBA
 +
|-
 +
|bgcolor="fdffaf" height="10px"|
 +
|align="center"| '''[[Citizens of Em Street (Season 31)|31]]'''
 +
|align="center"| 10-100
 +
|align="center"| TBA
 +
|align="center"| TBA
 +
|-
 +
|bgcolor="4b0044" height="10px"|
 +
|align="center"| '''[[Citizens of Em Street (Season 32)|32]]'''
 +
|align="center"| 10-100
 +
|align="center"| TBA
 +
|align="center"| TBA
 +
|-
 +
|bgcolor="ff0099" height="10px"|
 +
|align="center"| '''[[Citizens of Em Street (Season 33)|33]]'''
 +
|align="center"| 10-100
 +
|align="center"| TBA
 +
|align="center"| TBA
 +
|-
 +
|bgcolor="00ff66" height="10px"|
 +
|align="center"| '''[[Citizens of Em Street (Season 34)|34]]'''
 +
|align="center"| 10-100
 +
|align="center"| TBA
 +
|align="center"| TBA
 +
|-
 +
|bgcolor="9158ff" height="10px"|
 +
|align="center"| '''[[Citizens of Em Street (Season 35)|35]]'''
 +
|align="center"| 10-100
 +
|align="center"| TBA
 +
|align="center"| TBA
 +
|-
 +
|bgcolor="4b0fff" height="10px"|
 +
|align="center"| '''[[Citizens of Em Street (Season 36)|36]]'''
 +
|align="center"| 10-100
 +
|align="center"| TBA
 +
|align="center"| TBA
 +
|-
 +
|bgcolor="ff4b0f" height="10px"|
 +
|align="center"| '''[[Citizens of Em Street (Season 37)|37]]'''
 +
|align="center"| 10-100
 +
|align="center"| TBA
 +
|align="center"| TBA
 +
|-
 +
|bgcolor="c2f6ff" height="10px"|
 +
|align="center"| '''[[Citizens of Em Street (Season 38)|38]]'''
 +
|align="center"| 10-100
 +
|align="center"| TBA
 +
|align="center"| TBA
 +
|-
 +
|bgcolor="3c3c3c" height="10px"|
 +
|align="center"| '''[[Citizens of Em Street (Season 39)|39]]'''
 +
|align="center"| 10-100
 +
|align="center"| TBA
 +
|align="center"| TBA
 +
|-
 +
|bgcolor="00daff" height="10px"|
 +
|align="center"| '''[[Citizens of Em Street (Season 40)|40]]'''
 +
|align="center"| 10-100
 +
|align="center"| TBA
 +
|align="center"| TBA
 +
|-
 +
|bgcolor="d9d9d9" height="10px"|
 +
|align="center"| '''[[Citizens of Em Street (Season 41)|41]]'''
 +
|align="center"| 10-100
 +
|align="center"| TBA
 +
|align="center"| TBA
 +
|-
 +
|bgcolor="4b0044" height="10px"|
 +
|align="center"| '''[[Citizens of Em Street (Season 42)|42]]'''
 +
|align="center"| 10-100
 +
|align="center"| TBA
 +
|align="center"| TBA
 +
|-
 +
|bgcolor="00444b" height="10px"|
 +
|align="center"| '''[[Citizens of Em Street (Season 43)|43]]'''
 +
|align="center"| 10-100
 +
|align="center"| TBA
 +
|align="center"| TBA
 +
|-
 +
|bgcolor="ad9dc5" height="10px"|
 +
|align="center"| '''[[Citizens of Em Street (Season 44)|44]]'''
 +
|align="center"| 10-100
 +
|align="center"| TBA
 +
|align="center"| TBA
 +
|-
 +
|bgcolor="c5ad9d" height="10px"|
 +
|align="center"| '''[[Citizens of Em Street (Season 45)|45]]'''
 +
|align="center"| 10-100
 +
|align="center"| TBA
 +
|align="center"| TBA
 +
|-
 +
|bgcolor="a6a6a6" height="10px"|
 +
|align="center"| '''[[Citizens of Em Street (Season 46)|46]]'''
 +
|align="center"| 10-100
 +
|align="center"| TBA
 +
|align="center"| TBA
 +
|-
 +
|bgcolor="9dc5c1" height="10px"|
 +
|align="center"| '''[[Citizens of Em Street (Season 47)|47]]'''
 +
|align="center"| 10-100
 +
|align="center"| TBA
 +
|align="center"| TBA
 +
|-
 +
|bgcolor="9dc500" height="10px"|
 +
|align="center"| '''[[Citizens of Em Street (Season 47)|47]]'''
 +
|align="center"| 10-100
 +
|align="center"| TBA
 +
|align="center"| TBA
 +
|-
 +
|bgcolor="c59da1" height="10px"|
 +
|align="center"| '''[[Citizens of Em Street (Season 48)|48]]'''
 +
|align="center"| 10-100
 +
|align="center"| TBA
 +
|align="center"| TBA
 +
|-
 +
|bgcolor="ceadb0" height="10px"|
 +
|align="center"| '''[[Citizens of Em Street (Season 49)|49]]'''
 +
|align="center"| 10-100
 +
|align="center"| TBA
 +
|align="center"| TBA
 +
|-
 +
|bgcolor="4b0082" height="10px"|
 +
|align="center"| '''[[Citizens of Em Street (Season 50)|50]]'''
 +
|align="center"| 10-100
 +
|align="center"| TBA
 +
|align="center"| TBA
 +
|}
 +
==Episodes==
 +
===Pilot===
 +
{| class="wikitable" style="margin: auto; width: 100%"
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|-
 +
! style="width:8%" |No. overall
 +
! style="width:8%" |No. in season
 +
! English title
 +
! Original airdate
 +
! Prod. code
 +
{{Episode list
 +
|Title          = "[[Episode 1]]"
 +
|OriginalAirDate = TBA
 +
|ProdCode        = Ep1
 +
|EpisodeNumber  = 1
 +
|EpisodeNumber2  = 1
 +
|ShortSummary    = Javier officially moves to Em Street. Terry hangs out with Birdtha after school. Em tries to make Jav feel comfortable in the new environment. Tune and Harmony want to do something special for their 12th wedding anniversary.
 +
}}
 +
|}
 
=Article on Myself=
 
=Article on Myself=
 
{{NSFW|Pornographic Subject Matter}}
 
{{NSFW|Pornographic Subject Matter}}
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According to Steve Moore, "The Three Pigs" places the pigs in a "Real World" parody episode. They live in a loft and take in a wolf as a roommate in an attempt to be contemporary, open-minded pigs. The wolf is played by Harvey Fierstein, and he swears he's a vegan but comes out as a carnivore later. It was directed and written by Darrell Rooney and has the running time of 20 minutes. Despite calling it "hilarious", Steve Moore reportedly doesn't have a copy, though Jerry Beck has said he will look for it.
 
According to Steve Moore, "The Three Pigs" places the pigs in a "Real World" parody episode. They live in a loft and take in a wolf as a roommate in an attempt to be contemporary, open-minded pigs. The wolf is played by Harvey Fierstein, and he swears he's a vegan but comes out as a carnivore later. It was directed and written by Darrell Rooney and has the running time of 20 minutes. Despite calling it "hilarious", Steve Moore reportedly doesn't have a copy, though Jerry Beck has said he will look for it.
==The Moxy Show==
 
 
The Moxy Show, also known as The Moxy Pirate Show and The Moxy & Flea Show, was a CGI animated anthology series developed by Colossal Pictures and produced by Hanna-Barbera for Cartoon Network. It began airing on December 5th, 1993 and ended on January 2nd, 2000. It was an anthology series of classic cartoons that Cartoon Network commonly aired back in the early 1990s, and in-between them were interstitials of Moxy (Bobcat Goldthwait), a goofing off, fun-loving dog who has a crush on Melody from Josie and the Pussycats, and Flea (Penn Jillette in the show, Chris Rock in the "Moxy & Flea" pilot), a flea who likes to hang out and watch TV with Moxy.
 
The Moxy Show, also known as The Moxy Pirate Show and The Moxy & Flea Show, was a CGI animated anthology series developed by Colossal Pictures and produced by Hanna-Barbera for Cartoon Network. It began airing on December 5th, 1993 and ended on January 2nd, 2000. It was an anthology series of classic cartoons that Cartoon Network commonly aired back in the early 1990s, and in-between them were interstitials of Moxy (Bobcat Goldthwait), a goofing off, fun-loving dog who has a crush on Melody from Josie and the Pussycats, and Flea (Penn Jillette in the show, Chris Rock in the "Moxy & Flea" pilot), a flea who likes to hang out and watch TV with Moxy.
  
Line 153: Line 493:
 
It has been suggested that the series was cancelled because of parents complaining about the violence of the source material, but Joe Dante, the director of the films, says it was never finished because Gremlins 2 flopped at the box office. No footage of the pilot has been released, though there was a mention of it in an article in a 1990 issue of Bugs Bunny Magazine.
 
It has been suggested that the series was cancelled because of parents complaining about the violence of the source material, but Joe Dante, the director of the films, says it was never finished because Gremlins 2 flopped at the box office. No footage of the pilot has been released, though there was a mention of it in an article in a 1990 issue of Bugs Bunny Magazine.
 
==Mess O' Blues==
 
==Mess O' Blues==
'''Mess O' Blues''' is an original short film about a "over the hill aging rock star who thinks he's Elvis" created by Van Partible in 1993 for his senior thesis project that would serve as a basis for the Cartoon Network original show Johnny Bravo.
+
Mess O' Blues is an original short film about a "over the hill aging rock star who thinks he's Elvis" created by Van Partible in 1993 for his senior thesis project that would serve as a basis for the Cartoon Network original show Johnny Bravo.
  
 
While working at Loyola Marymount University, Partible decided to pursue a career in animation, and so he started working on a senior thesis project intitled Mess O' Blues. Partible started with the concept of three Elvis Presley impersonators (or "Elvi" as Van Partible puts it) who fought crime. However, due to his time constraints and the fact that he was doing all of the work himself, the idea was cut down to just one Elvis impersonator.
 
While working at Loyola Marymount University, Partible decided to pursue a career in animation, and so he started working on a senior thesis project intitled Mess O' Blues. Partible started with the concept of three Elvis Presley impersonators (or "Elvi" as Van Partible puts it) who fought crime. However, due to his time constraints and the fact that he was doing all of the work himself, the idea was cut down to just one Elvis impersonator.
  
 
Dan McLaughin (Partible's animation professor) showed the short to a friend working at Hanna-Barbera Productions. The studio saw the short and loved it so much they asked Partible if he could do a pitch for a seven-minute short cartoon, with Mess O' Blues as the inspiration. This became the original Johnny Bravo short.
 
Dan McLaughin (Partible's animation professor) showed the short to a friend working at Hanna-Barbera Productions. The studio saw the short and loved it so much they asked Partible if he could do a pitch for a seven-minute short cartoon, with Mess O' Blues as the inspiration. This became the original Johnny Bravo short.
 
Despite its success, Mess O' Blues has never been released or even seen publicly, unlike the widely available and similarly made What a Cartoon predecessor The Whoopass Girls - which would later become The Powerpuff Girls. The only footage that has ever been made available are a few short, mute clips from a short mini-documentary that was included as a bonus feature on the Johnny Bravo: Season 1 (Cartoon Network Hall of Fame) DVD entitled Bringing Up Johnny Bravo.
 
==The Blues Brothers: The Animated Series==
 
'''The Blues Brothers: The Animated Series''' is an unaired animated adaptation of The Blues Brothers that would have aired on UPN. The series was set to star the brothers of the original movie's actors (Peter Aykroyd in Dan's place, and Jim Belushi in John's place), but for unknown reasons, the series never aired.
 
 
In 1997, Dan Aykroyd sold the rights to The Blues Brothers to the TV network UPN. Film Roman, the animation company that produced The Simpsons, animated eight of the thirteen episodes ordered by the network. It's likely that the episodes were only ever produced in animatic from. However, in late 1997, the series was cancelled, and the eight episodes were never aired.
 
 
The fansite Blues Brothers Central provides not only an episode list but a cast list as well. As stated above, The Blues Brothers themselves, Elwood and Jake, were not voiced by their original actors (due to John Belushi's death in 1982). However, Aykroyd and Belushi's brothers, Peter Aykroyd and Jim Belushi, offered to take up the roles and were cast as the "new" Blues Brothers. The site also says that the eight episodes were shown at MIPCOM (a TV entertainment market/festival of sorts, held once a year in Cannes). Even still, the series has yet to be released in any form.
 
 
In November 2015, an early rough cut of the promo video likely screened at MIPCOM surfaced online, but has since been lost. Although some voice acting had been recorded at the time, all of the planned footage, including an introduction where Jake and Elwood run over, maim, or belittle various other network mascots, still remained in animatic form. Various live-action clips, both of "archival footage" from Saturday Night Live and of the cast and crew at work, were also intended to be shown, but had yet to be produced or licensed. On May 2016 an entire episode was uploaded online (also in animatic form), but has also since been deleted.
 
 
On December 17th, 2018, a script for the episode entitled, "Mama's Day" was uploaded online. The episode was probably never put into production.
 
 
On March 25th, 2019, a script for the first episode entitled, "The People's Party", was uploaded online. Since this is one of the first 8 episodes, it is likely that this episode exists in at least animatic form somewhere.
 
==The Magic 7==
 
'''The Magic 7''' is a lost, presumably unfinished, animated children's TV movie written and directed by Roger Holzberg. It is about the adventures of two children that battle the arch-enemies of planet Earth. The film was intended to be released on April 22nd back in 1997 but was postponed. Later in 2005, plans were made to release the film, only to have the film postponed again.
 
 
The film started its production back in 1990, from which it has been delayed several times since. This was around the time that John Candy and Madeline Kahn, alongside the other actors (e.g. James Earl Jones, Michael J. Fox...), were starting the voice acting sessions for the film. However, John Candy died in 1994 and Madeline Kahn also passed away in 1999. Candy was to perform as the character of "Smokestack Sam" and Kahn was to play "Wastra". After their deaths, the audio recordings of their performance and their casting were removed from the film permanently.
 
 
The year after Candy's death, a company that goes by the name of Pulse Entertainment and Distribution, under the supervision of their Chief Executive Officer, decided to buy the rights of the film and subsequently made the decision to fully produce the animated film; they then hired a songwriter named Robert J. Sherman to create extra songs for the film. The project reached a halt due to insufficient funds and the film project was cancelled in the early 2000s.
 
 
According to Google and IMDb, the film was eventually released in late 2008 or early 2009 but this is highly unlikely; if it was the case, some footage from the film would have turned up by now.
 
 
To this day, no footage or stills from the film has ever seen the light of day and it is likely that all we will ever see of the film is concept art.
 
==Red Hot Riding Hood Deleted Scenes==
 
The famous MGM cartoon short Red Hot Riding Hood originally had '''two sets of scenes that were cut from the final version in demand from the censors'''.
 
 
The first set was from the scene where Woolfie makes extremely lustful cartoony reactions to Red Hot Riding Hood while she is singing on stage. Originally Woolfie had much racier wild takes that the censors considered too energetic and thus they saw to it that they were removed.
 
 
The second was the original alternate ending where instead of Woolfie swearing off of women and talking about how he'll kill himself if he ever sees another woman and then shooting himself into a continually howling ghost upon seeing Red Hot Riding Hood, the short ends upon Grandma marrying Woolfie in a shotgun wedding, which has a caricature of Tex Avery as the Justice of Peace who marries them, and then Grandma and Woolfie with their half-human half-wolf offspring all attending Red's show. This original ending was removed at the decision of the censors because it not only implied bestiality but also made light of marriage, which was considered taboo in the days of the Hays Office Code.
 
 
The uncut version of the short is now widely considered lost, although it is stated that prints of it were shown to military audiences overseas during World War II, and at the request of Tex Avery to make MGM show it uncut overseas (which he had officially stated at one point), and possibly at the request of a soldier who had heard of the original ending and wanted to show it to his fellow soldiers in war, which meant that MGM would have given him at least one uncut print of the short. Tex Avery also said that the soldiers who did watch the short got a kick out of it.
 
 
However, to this day it is unknown if these prints, or if any prints of the uncut version still exist.
 
==Absolute==
 
Greydon Square is an American hip hop artist who gained popularity in 2007 with his official debut album The Compton Effect. Best known for his anti-religious lyrics and the creation of the Grand-Unified Theory group of atheist music artists, Greydon has so far released four albums, the most recent being 2012's Type II: The Mandelbrot Set, but in 2004, three years before the release of his debut, he produced and self-released a full album called '''Absolute'''.
 
 
At the time Greydon, real name Eddie Collins, was fresh out of serving in the Iraq war and had not yet even taken on the moniker of Greydon Square, going instead by the name Apocalypse.
 
 
Although the album was given a limited release it has been officially unavailable since long before Greydon's rise in popularity and has not been leaked on any torrent sites. Greydon appears to be keeping it under wraps due to his own concern regarding its inferior quality, and no clips or even a tracklisting is available through official channels or any other. Although there are possibly a few individuals who possess copies of the album, and Greydon Square himself is likely to have a copy of the music, the chances are small that Absolute will become available in any form.
 
 
Greydon Square has since released "Reality" from Absolute on bandcamp as part of his subscription service.
 
==The “Rainbow Ponies Special”==
 
After the success of the original My Little Pony special - which would later be known as Rescue at Midnight Castle - in 1984, there were plans for another animated special. This Unreleased My Little Pony Special was to involve the Rainbow Ponies and bring back several of the cast from the first episode.
 
 
No such special was released, instead, another one-off is known as Escape from Katrina was created. The only footage that survives is ten seconds of footage seen at the end of a VHS for Rescue at Midnight Castle.
 
 
It has been speculated that this special has been cancelled and retooled due to some negative feedback by parents on Rescue at Midnight Castle, complaining about its dark moments.
 
 
There is a European VHS cover for the Escape from Katrina special that has nothing to do with the actual special. It's speculated that this was based on the Rainbow Ponies special as a few of the ponies appear on the cover. A prototypical incarnation of Megan and her little brother Danny both appear on the cover as well. Danny, who would later co-star in the My Little Pony 'N' Friends series, appears riding an older, winged version of Spike.
 
==Killdozer Audio Tapes==
 
Marvin Heemeyer made international headlines on June 4th 2004,[1] when he, as the result of a zoning dispute, took to a homemade, reinforced, armoured Komatsu D355A bulldozer (which the media has since dubbed the "Killdozer"), and began demolishing buildings in Granby, Colorado, (including both the Town Hall and the house of the former mayor). Ultimately, after his bulldozer became stuck in a building's basement after trying to demolish it, Heemeyer drew a .357-caliber handgun and shot himself in the head.
 
 
The zoning dispute began in 2001, when construction was approved for a cement manufacturing plant in a lot near Heemeyer's muffler shop (said particular lot being used frequently by Heemeyer to get to and from his business). He failed multiple times to appeal the decision, and, adding fuel to the fire, was later fined $2500 for having junk cars on his property, and for not having his business connections to the sewer line. In a last-ditch effort, he tried petitioning the city, although was unsuccessful. Admitting defeat, he decided to purchase a bulldozer, with the intention of creating an alternative route to his shop, although, this too was rejected by city officials. It is at this point that Heemeyer cracked, and began work on his "Killdozer". Over the course of one and a half years, Heemeyer reinforced his bulldozer using concrete and steel. In addition to armoring the bulldozer, he also installed mounted rifles and several video cameras (which he linked up to corresponding monitors inside). His two-hour rampage took out thirteen buildings in total, starting with the very building that had sparked the whole dispute; the cement factory. Despite efforts from police, none of their weapons were able to penetrate the bulldozer's armor. The final building destroyed was Gambles hardware store, in the basement of which the bulldozer became stuck, as previously mentioned. In total, he caused roughly seven million dollars worth of damage.
 
 
Shortly before embarking on his rampage, Heemeyer recorded '''a series of audio tapes outlining his motives''' (totaling roughly two and a half hours, the last recording of which was created just thirteen days beforehand) and mailed them to his brother in South Dakota, who in turn handed them over to the FBI. The FBI then turned them over to the Grand County Sheriff's Office. The tapes were thought to be lost, until March 31st, 2018, when the full audiotapes were uploaded anonymously by YouTube user "Luke M". The video was taken down in 2019, but the audio can now be heard on the Internet Archive.
 
==Hoodwinked!==
 
Hoodwinked! was a CGI-animated film directed by Cory Edwards and distributed by The Weinstein Company in 2005.
 
 
Originally, Hoodwinked! '''had a much different cast than what was shown in theaters'''. The original cast had recorded all the dialogue for the film, but the crew realized how big the film could be and decided on replacing them with celebrity voice actors.[1] The change was so far into the production of the film that the replacement voice actors had to deliver their lines in the exact same fashion the original voice actors did. The only two main cast characters to keep their roles were Patrick Warburton as The Wolf and Andy Dick as Boingo. The voices that were replaced and who they were replaced by are listed below:
 
 
*Tara Strong as Red Puckett (Replaced by Anne Hathaway). Also voiced Zorra, a member of Granny's ski team.
 
*David Ogden Stiers as Kirk (Replaced by Jim Belushi). Also voiced Nikki Flippers.
 
*Tony Leech, an associate of directors The Edwards Brothers, as Detective Stork (Replaced by Anthony Anderson).
 
*Sally Struthers as Granny Puckett (Replaced by Glenn Close).
 
*Joel McCrary as Chief Grizzly (Replaced by Xzibit).
 
*Tom Kenny as Woolworth the Sheep (Replaced by Chazz Palmanteri).
 
 
Benjy Gaither, who voiced Japeth the Goat in the final film, also came close to losing his role but was kept for unknown reasons.
 
 
The Weinstein brothers also insisted on shortening the songs of the film, fearing audiences would get bored by them. However, most of the cuts were included on the DVD as a special feature. These cuts included:
 
*An extra verse in "Great Big World", which took place between when Red was lifted by the birds over the river and stopping on the cliff.
 
*A small five-second segment of "Be Prepared".
 
*The second verse of Kurt's "Schnitzel Song", which showed Kurt tap dancing to the children and the children throwing their schnitzel sticks in the air in celebration.
 
*An additional verse to "Tree Critter" before the ski race.
 
 
It is currently unknown where the original audio is today, or even if it still exists. If it's anywhere, it is probably in The Weinstein Company's vault, or with the director Cory Edwards. Although the original film was a success, the 2011 sequel Hoodwinked Two!: Hood vs. Evil bombed at the box office and was critically panned by both critics and audiences, leaving very little chance of the original version getting an official release.
 
==King Koopa's Kool Kartoons==
 
'''King Koopa's Kool Kartoons''' was a local television live-action Bozo the Clown-esque spin-off of DIC Entertainment's Super Mario Bros. Super Show! hosted by King Koopa (portrayed by Christopher Collins in 1989 and later Pat Pinney in 1990, both in a rubber costume and modified appearance-wise to be more believable for a live-action show). Koopa would interact with a live audience of children (called "King Koopa's Troopas), showcase cartoons from the 1920s and 1930s that were in no way related to the Mario franchise, and would even give away prizes such as certificates and NES accessories such as the Power Glove at the end of the show, which played out in a pre-recorded segment.
 
 
It was distributed by Fox Television Stations and was aired in Southern California on Los Angeles Fox owned-and-operated station KTTV 11 in the holiday season of 1989/1990 on after-school afternoons and ran for 30 minutes before being later re-aired on The Children's Channel in the United Kingdom. This was possibly done to gauge the show's popularity with children before potentially expanding it, but it was cancelled after only one season. According to Forest of Illusion, the show was cancelled due to a letter from an angry child being sent in, and Koopa's response being "OK, you can say all you want about me, but I know where YOU live".
 
 
Due to its poor reception and the show's failure to catch on, little footage of the show is available. Additionally, it likely hasn't aired in many places outside of Los Angeles. Currently, only the intro and the credits of an episode can be viewed, although RetroJunk user MlaconoSP claims to have recorded two episodes. As of 2017, he hasn't given any news since 2006. On August 4th, 2018, user Neeel uploaded 49 seconds of footage onto his YouTube channel. The footage was part of a Thanksgiving marathon for Fox Kids in 1989.
 
==Toy Story: The Black Friday Reel==
 
When Disney started working with Pixar on the project, they wanted the movie to be targeted for adults and to be released via their Touchstone Company label. This early version, dubbed '''the Black Friday Reel''', was notably a lot more cynical, crude, and dark than the final product. Due to a lack of information shared on this original version, it is unknown how far it went into development before being fully re-written; however, it is known that this version was full-out storyboarded and scripted. When Disney executives looked at the final product, they were less than enthused and the screening was poorly received overall. The incident sparked Roy Disney to ask John Lasseter (Pixar's founder) "You seriously listened to us?". The original adult version was scrapped in exchange for the film that is known today.
 
==Sam & Max: Freelance Police==
 
Sam & Max: Freelance Police is a cancelled point-and-click adventure game that was developed by LucasArts from 2002 to 2004 for the PC. The game was intended to be a sequel to the 1993 PC game Sam & Max Hit the Road and before the game's release was cancelled, the game received a Teen rating from the ESRB for "animated violence". The project was preceded by [[Sam & Max Plunge Through Space (cancelled Xbox adventure game; 2001-2002)|Sam & Max Plunge Through Space]], a game which was to be developed by Infinite Machine, a small company consisting of former LucasArts employees. After that game was cancelled in 2002 due to the bankruptcy of the company, LucasArts acquired the rights to Sam & Max and attempted to develop Sam & Max: Freelance Police, which was also abandoned later.
 
 
Sam & Max began life as a comic strip by Steve Purcell, that chronicled the many misadventures of Freelance Police officers Sam, a six foot tall brown anthropomorphic dog with a grey suit and fedora, and Max, a three-foot-tall white rabbit with no clothes.
 
 
In 1992, being an employee of LucasArts at the time, Purcell approached LucasArts to develop his comic strip into an adventure game with him as one of the lead designers. One year later, Sam & Max Hit the Road was released to critical and financial acclaim. For nine years the video game series laid dormant, though Purcell continued the comic strip for another three years and a critically acclaimed television series was produced in that time. On August 27, 2002, fans' waiting seemed to pay off as LucasArts announced a sequel to Hit the Road, titled Freelance Police, was being produced alongside the Full Throttle sequel, Hell on Wheels (which also ended up being cancelled).
 
 
Over the course of its development, LucasArts gave the game as much media as they could for an adventure game in a declining adventure game market. An E3 2003 trailer (see below) confirmed that Sam and Max's original voice actors Bill Farmer (the then and now the voice of Goofy) and Nick Jameson (who voiced Palpatine in Star Wars: Clone Wars) were set to reprise their roles. Very little is known about the game's plot, though an interview with game director Michael Stemmle described the plot as "really six stories, loosely held together by a thrilling uber-plot." Flint Paper, a character who cameoed in Hit the Road, was also confirmed to return alongside the titular characters. However, on March 3rd, 2004, less than two months after Semmle had given the aforementioned interview, LucasArts announced that Freelance Police had been cancelled, citing the falling sales of adventure games as the culprit. Many game journalists, as well as many LucasArts employees (including Steve Purcell), were disappointed by this turn of events. As a result of the cancellation, the game would end up as the last adventure game LucasArts would develop before closing the doors on its adventure game industries.
 
 
In 2005, LucasArts' ownership of the Sam & Max franchise would expire, allowing creator Steve Purcell to take his franchise to the fledgling TellTale Games studio, made up of former LucasArts employees. The end result was an episodic game series released in 2006 called Sam & Max Save the World, which would last six episodes and spawn two sequel seasons (Beyond Time and Space and The Devil's Playhouse). Very little of Freelance Police was carried over into these games, however, as TellTale was wary about using similar design patterns. The extent of things carried over from Freelance Police seem to be the six stories loosely strung together to form an uber-plot, and what appear to be the character basis for Hugh Bliss and Sybil Pandemic (the former of which seems to appear in early screenshots, the latter appearing in an early animation test, one of the four found on YouTube).
 
 
As for Freelance Police itself, the chances of it getting an official release anytime soon are between slim and none. It is possible that enough of the game was completed to warrant a release, seeing as the game was cancelled right around the time it was supposed to be released; that and the fact that quite a selection of gameplay screenshots and animation tests have since been made available. Even if an official release never occurs, it is possible the game could be leaked as a ROM online. For now, though, this game remains one of the many unreleased games people are still clamoring to see to this day.
 
==American History X==
 
American History X is a 1998 drama film directed by Tony Kaye. It stars Edward Norton as a Nazi skinhead that makes a remarkable transformation after 3 years in prison. It received critical acclaim for its realistic portrayal of its subject matter, and it earned Norton an Academy Award nomination for Leading Actor. Despite American History X being a success, a lot of drama went during the post-production. In the end, New Line Cinema removed director Tony Kaye from the editing process and released the movie and it was 40 minutes longer than what Tony Kaye had envisioned. The entire 96 minute cut of the movie has yet to surface.
 
 
American History X stars Edward Norton as Derek who is influenced by skinheads upon the death of his father when he is killed during a drive-by shooting. After a basketball game with a rival gang, two members of that gang attempt to steal Derek's truck. Derek kills all three gang members and is sentenced to three years in jail. Derek's younger brother Daniel (Edward Furlong) starts to mimick his brother's actions and soon finds himself in trouble at school where he writes a paper in support of Hitler. While in jail, Derek sees the flaws in the skinheads and leaves the group. In the end, Daniel is shot in a restroom by a crip despite disaffiliating with the skinheads.
 
 
Filming for American History X wrapped up in early 1998 and with a 96-minute movie, there were between the cast, director and the studio. Director Tony Kaye and film distributor New Line Cinema had two different visions for how the film should play out. So much conflict arose during post-production that Tony Kaye would only communicate with New Lines Cinema through paid ads in the newspaper. With Tony Kaye being next to impossible to work with, New Line Cinema took over the editing process. The final cut of the film that was released is 40 minutes longer than Tony Kaye's cut of the film.
 
 
In 2002, Tony Kaye wrote a piece with The Guardian about the production nightmare of American History X stating:
 
 
“My problem all through American History X was that I could never tell anyone what I wanted to do with the film. Sometimes I didn’t even know myself. More often, I was so intimidated by the process that I went into meltdown if I wasn’t left alone to work things out. Of course, if you actually listened to what Norton was saying, you could hear that none of it made sense in film-making terms: that’s not his forte, as you’ll know if you saw the movie that he directed, Keeping the Faith. “Pretty f*cking awful” hardly covers that one.“
 
 
The surviving film was actually stolen from the director's hands by both New Line Cinema (the film's distributor) and Edward Norton (who is a notoriously difficult actor to deal with). Several squabbles over what scenes should stay and what order they should be in resulted in an extremely lengthy post-production process. After New Line Cinema rejected Kaye's first and second cuts, Norton eventually ended up helming the editing process in early-1998, allegedly tailoring his cut in order to specifically give himself more screentime, something Kaye believes "ruined" the film. There is little information available towards what exactly was different. It is widely believed that Norton destroyed many of the master copies of the deleted scenes. Only a handful of scenes were featured on the movie's DVD or leaked onto the internet. Kaye did eventually release a documentary about the struggles the film's production had, but even that movie has been screened a limited amount of times. To this day, it is unknown exactly how many more scenes have yet to be released if any. No material at all from the earlier cut was ever made publicly available until a workprint of Kaye's second cut, dating around late-1997, was leaked online in the form of a rip of a high-generation VHS tape. Lost Media Wiki founder dycaite had initially uploaded a copy of the workprint that he had acquired from anonymous sources, however, it was later removed from Mega due to a copyright claim. An alternative rip of the bootleg has surfaced on private torrent trackers, such as MySpleen.
 
==Recess Pilot==
 
The pilot of Recess, The Break In, was originally produced in 1996 as a pitch to Disney to get the show onto television. The pilot had noticeably different animation and character designs than that seen in the series. After the series was picked up, they reanimated the show and updated the character designs before Disney aired the remade "The Break In".
 
 
The original pitch version of the pilot with the older designs and animation hasn't been released to the public. However, clips of it to appear on a "Sneak Peek" ABC Saturday Mornings promo on 1997 VHS releases of the live-action 101 Dalmatians film and "Doug's Birthday Blues" (and possibly on station IDs for certain ABC stations). Additionally, a piece of concept art for Vince's design as used in the pilot can be seen on "The Top Ten Secrets of Disney's Recess", a featurette included on the Recess: School's Out! DVD release. According to Paul Germain, co-creator of the series, those clips were actually animated from the initial pitch animatic of the pilot which had the older storyboards and designs for the characters long before their final designs were set in stone. The selective scenes were animated by the promotional department at Disney, made specifically for the Saturday Morning promo and as such are the only ones that were animated. The original animatic has yet to be released though.
 
==Weird Herald==
 
Weird Herald was a San Franciscan acoustic quartet, who mostly played in clubs such as the Matrix from 1968 to 1969. The two most prominent members were Billy Dean Andrus and Paul Ziegler, the two lead guitarists. Ziegler's whereabouts are unknown, but drummer Patrick McIntire and bassist Cecil Bollinger both survive and have provided information about the band.
 
 
All in all, Weird Herald's only released material was one 45, "Saratoga James" b/w "Just Yesterday", but more recordings exist, (an entire album's worth of material, in fact), which have yet to be seen or heard outside of band members or their families. Recorded in 1968-69 at the Max Weise studio in San Francisco, the mysterious album, (of which the title has not been made public knowledge), was never released for unknown reasons. More than one copy still exists; one was apparently owned by Max Weise, one by Paul Ziegler, and one by Bill Andrus (now owned and partially digitized by his family). The owner of the "Rock Archaeology 101" blog apparently heard a snippet of the album in 2010 and reacted favorably, and the Andrus family, as well as Patrick McIntire, have expressed interest in releasing it to the public. Notably, it is reported that the Matrix's owners recorded every band performance, though the fate of these tapes and their whereabouts are unknown.
 

Revision as of 14:13, 1 March 2020

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Article on Myself

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This article has been tagged as NSFW due to its Pornographic Subject Matter.



Em YouTube icon.jpeg

Em’s YouTube Icon.

Status: Lost

Em is a Canadian YouTuber from Nova Scotia, who currently has 54 Subscribers. He is a YouTuber who specializes in Lost Media Videos and Nostalgic Subject Matter. Outside of YouTube, he is a cartoonist working on his upcoming cartoon franchise, Citizens of Em Street. He is also, more notably, a Rule 34 Artist who posts his artwork to Paheal and Furaffinity.

Even though both Channels are currently up, Em has unlisted, privated, and deleted many of his old videos that either contain personal information about him, or that he thinks are below his quality standards. He also does the same thing on his Furaffinity Account.

Em’s Old Account

Em’s first Account uploaded its first video on September 26th 2016. The channel’s focus was Doll Videos for kids. His Fourth Doll Video was Unlisted because it showed his face in the end. Em unlisted Every video showing his face, in order to keep his anonymity. And changed the name of the channel to “This Channel is Inactive.” A Year after he stopped uploading, a new video was uploaded titled “Carrie’s Slime Video,” which was made by Em’s Younger Sister, whom he shares the channel with.

Em’s New Account

In 2018 Em uploaded an Animation titled “Emily the Rabbit vs The CTW.” It was a Slideshow, not an animation, and it featured Em’s Now-Retired Character Emily the Rabbit. When Emily the Rabbit was replaced with Josy the Rabbit (who would later be replaced with Javier Monotonious), and Em thought the video was crap, he deleted it. The Animation revolved around Emily the Rabbit demanding the Children’s Television Workshop make Bert and Ernie get married. Until Ernie appears, and says that he is actually in love with his Rubber Duckie.

Em also has a series titled “The Sotnem Recordings,” in which Em goes on pornographic cartoon websites (like 8muses or PalComix), and reads parody comics of cartoon characters, whether or not he likes them. He has currently made 5, but only 3 have been uploaded. Part 1 (Randall’s Revenge on Mentos), Part 2 (Simon is taken my Memesauce), and Part 4 (Mrs. Fiona Chupa-Chups). All of them have been deleted, Parts 1 and 4 were deleted by Em. While Part 2 was deleted by YouTube for having uncensored Nudity. Em has copies of Parts 1-3 and 5 but won’t release them on another site due to the first one being over one hour long (one of his few videos to reach that goal).

Status

All of Em’s Lost Videos are considered permanently Lost, as once Em uploads his videos, he almost never has back-up copies. Even if he did, they wouldn’t be uploaded either due to length, or content that violates YouTubes Terms of Service.

References

External Links

Outside Text

Canzo Empyrean

Canzo Empyrean is a 2007 film from underground filmmaker Justin Fornal, who's more well known for his works as his alter ego, Baron Ambrosia. It was allegedly shot over a decade.

The film, which borrows characters from the G.I. Joe universe, is set in a futuristic dystopia, where AIDS runs rampant and, as a result, sex has been outlawed. With a runtime of 2 hours and 20 minutes, the film is particularly notorious for it's concluding scene, in which a choreographed fight was shot illegally atop the Brooklyn Bridge's Manhattan tower, which put Fornal in jail on top of being issued a $160 fine.

Canzo Empyrean premiered in June of 2007 in Monrovia, Liberia to mass praise, allegedly even going as far as inspiring a "Canzo" street gang, and was screened in the US for the time time the following year, in a once-abandoned underground ballroom/cinema that was previously restored by Fornal and subsequently dubbed the "Mastabah to Megiddo". Getting there required roughly 40 minutes of traveling through underground passageways, some of which were filled with waist-deep water.

At least one person has claimed to have contacted Fornal to try and secure a copy of the film. Upon making the request, they were informed that if they were to complete a series of tasks (namely involving spray-painting the Canzo Empyrean logo onto a total of 20 items in their city, including a police car), they would be provided with a uniquely watermarked copy of the film. However, they were also given a stern warning that there would be "serious consequences" were their copy to ever find it's way online.[3] Despite this, copies have allegedly been up for sale via private online collectors' groups, fetching upwards of $500, though this has never actually been proven to be true and is, at this point, merely a rumor.

Despite this, a total of roughly 45 minutes of related footage - including both direct excerpts from the film along with trailers - has found its way online via both the film's bizarre official website (which is now defunct, though still accessible via The Wayback Machine) and Fornal's Baron Ambrosia YouTube channel. The full film has yet to be released.

The Primevals

The Primevals is an incomplete sci-fi/fantasy film directed by David Allen. The film's plot is vague, but it's known to involve time travel, Eskimos, yetis, robots, and giant lizards. The film also combined live action with stop-motion animation.

Allen first began pitching the project to the British Hammer Films studio in the late 1960s. In 1978, Allen, along with producer Charles Band, began production on the film. However, the finances for the movie fell through, and the project started and stopped several times before an indefinite halt. In 1994, new funding was gained and production restarted. Principal filming of the live action scenes was completed in Romania with a new cast, and Allen continued to work on the post-production and stop-motion effects until his untimely death in 1999, which has ended all production of the film since.

Although colleagues of Allen's have vowed to complete the film based on his storyboards, financial difficulties have stalled the production again. A workprint exists, but only a few early scenes have surfaced.

Bobby's Girl

Bobby's Girl is an unfinished animated film produced by Ralph Bakshi and John Kricfalusi. Bakshi saw the potential in Kricfalusi and decided to work on a project with him. The film was to be a parody of 80's teen films like 16 Candles and The Breakfast Club.

When Bakshi pitched the film to Jeff Sagansky, the president of TriStar Pictures production at the time, he was given $150,000 for production of the film. This funding prompted Bakshi to move back to Los Angeles. However, the duo was evidently unable to fully produce the film by the time Sagansky left TriStar, which forced Bakshi to re-pitch it to TriStar. The new executives didn't see the appeal, however, and ended up cutting off his finances. Later, Bobby's Girl was reworked into a potential primetime series titled Suzy's in Love, but this also attracted little attention, leaving the entire project dead.

Artwork for the film can be seen in Bakshi's book Unfiltered: The Complete Ralph Bakshi, as well as on his official website, and on the blog of animator Jim Smith, who also worked on the film. It's unknown if any actual form of animation has been made, however.

N.I.N.A.

R&B/rap singer Lisa Lopes, (more commonly known as Left Eye, her stage name), from popular girl band TLC had planned on going solo, following TLC's increasing popularity throughout the 90s. In 2001 she released her first and only solo album, Supernova, which received mixed reception. She had planned on releasing a second album titled N.I.N.A., which had her working with glam rock legend David Bowie, whom she was also trying to get involved with the fourth TLC album, 3D. The album was in production until she was unfortunately killed in a car crash on April 25th, 2002 in Honduras, leading to the album being scrapped.

N.I.N.A. was slated for a posthumous release by Suge Knight, who stated that he had intentions to release the album in October 2002, but this never happened for unknown reasons. The only official release from the album is the track “Too Street 4 T.V.” which appeared on the soundtrack to the film "Dysfunktional Family".

The Superman

It is often thought that the character's debut was in 1938 with Action Comics No. 1. However, Superman had two other known (or, in this case, planned) appearances before this issue. The first was a depiction of the character as a villain in a short story called The Reign of the Superman dated for June 1933.[1] This short story, though extremely rare in physical form, is readily available online.

After Reign, Superman's creators, Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster, started playing with the idea of making the character a hero instead of a villain. They got in contact with a publishing company, Consolidated Book Publishing. The duo worked enthusiastically and hard, even receiving a promising letter for publication.[2] Eventually, though, Consolidated pulled out, leaving Siegel stressed. After trying again with a few other publishing companies that denied them, Siegel threw the entire issue into a fire out of rage and frustration.[1][2] It wouldn't be for another 5 years that the hero would finally see his first publication.

All that survives of this comic is the cover, where Superman is seen in an entirely different design (notably bare-chested). Little is known about its plot, or what other character designs may have looked like. Siegel and Shuster later described - of what little they remembered - that this early Superman was a non-alien crime fighter, crouching on rooftops and wearing a bat-like cape, ironically making him more like Batman, years before the actual Batman would be created.

Clerks: The Live-Action Sitcom

In 1994, Kevin Smith had his feature length directorial debut with Clerks, a black and white comedy film about the daily lives of two store clerks.

Due to its overwhelming success, Touchstone Television began work on a television series adaptation/continuation of the film unbeknownst to Smith. When the director was eventually made aware of the project, casting had already begun and decisions had been made regarding the tone and story of the series. Although he attempted to be a part of the production, more of his time was devoted to his second film Mallrats, which he had been in the process of filming when approached by Touchstone.

These early production issues, in addition to the fact that an early script by Smith was rejected by the studio, caused the director to eventually become disheartened with the project. The R-rated film being translated to the small screen also meant that the content would have to be toned down considerably. The "family friendly" Clerks series lacked the sexual humor, swearing, and mentions of drug use present in the film and added on new characters and locations (such as an ice cream parlor) that completely changed the tone of the series from that of its source.

Despite the fact that Brian 'O' Halloran ("Dante Hicks" in the film) and Jeff Anderson ("Randall Graves") had reportedly both auditioned for parts both were rejected, with the series instead opting for an entirely new cast and only off-hand mentions of the film's characters to connect the two projects.

The Disney executives thought that the setting of a convenience store would be a good place to set a sitcom that would play to the mid-90s Gen X audience, what they didn’t like about Clerks was everything else. The film’s sexual humor and frequent cursing were scrubbed first, followed by long monologues about pop culture and any recreational drug use. A tanning salon was added to the strip mall so a young Keri Russell could be a recurring ditzy character. An ice cream parlor was also added to make room for Rick Gomez’s character (yes, Pete and Pete fans, that is Endless Mike). The Randal character’s dry humor was replaced with the now-trademark schtick of SNL alum Jim Brewer, changing Clerks into something that barely resembled Clerks.

Bernie and the Invisibles

Fronted by the charismatic Bernie Joelson, the band received a fair amount of praise, notably from Pagans lead singer Mike Hudson. Although they recorded an album worth of material in the 1970s, the only track that has ever surfaced is "I Don't Know Where I Am", which is included on the 2002 Smog Veil compilation Pie and Ears: Volume 2. Some other tracks are said to be titled "Chinese Church", "PCP", "Away I Go", and "Let's Leave Tonight". Apparently, some of these songs were intended to be released as singles, but for unknown reasons never were. It's been rumored that the owner of Smog Veil owns the original recordings, but has yet to release them.

The Skywayman

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This article has been tagged as NSFL due to its disturbing subject matter.


On the night of August 2, 1920, one stunt was being filmed using floodlights to help guide the pilots. The two pilots, Ormer Locklear and Milton "Skeets" Elliott, were operating a biplane and instructed the crew members to shut off the lights when they were getting ready to get close to the ground. They had flares attached to the wings to give the planes the illusion that they were on fire. The plane was to simulate a crash on the ground. The crew neglected the directions to turn off the floodlights. Blinded by the glare of the lights, the pilots had no idea the ground was closer to them than they thought and the plane crashed, killing both instantly. Locklear's girlfriend, Viola Dana, was on set and witnessed the crash. This scene and its aftermath, including Dana's horrified reaction, was left in the film, making it one of the first films to feature the onscreen deaths of its members. The scene shocked audiences worldwide.

No footage of the film is known to exist, but some production stills, ads, and photos of the crash have survived. In 1980, a 13-part television documentary titled Hollywood: A Celebration of the American Silent Film was made, and episode 5 "Hazard of the Game" details the stunt with interviews and stills. Traces of Death (a film series that imitates Faces of Death) reportedly tried to find the footage, only to find out that the film was lost.

ImprovOlympic

Sometime in 1988, the very young Chicago comedy school, ImprovOlympic, was offered a pilot for a Whose Line is it Anyway?-style improvisation game show in Los Angeles. Charna Halpern, a director and teacher at the institution, brought along some of what she felt were her best students, including a fresh-faced Chris Farley, who had recently arrived there from Madison.

However, as filming of the special progressed, with Farley and the rest of the team doing some intelligent, highbrow improv exercises, the producer was frustrated at the material he was being given, claiming it was "too smart" and insisting that they "dumb it down". One by one, comics were fired and replaced by what Halpern referred to as "dick joke" comedians. Farley, still on board as a performer, approached Halpern with concern that he felt he had to bow to the producers wishes as he didn't want to be fired as well. Halpern told him to go ahead, and Farley proceeded to do routines involving pulling his pants up to the crack of his buttocks, dancing around and making a fool of himself. According to Halpern, the producer and crew fell on their faces laughing, as he had given them what they wanted.

The pilot was scrapped, however, and Farley returned to Chicago, where he eventually went on to fame with The Second City and Saturday Night Live before his untimely death at the age of 33 in 1997 of a drug overdose.

Instintos Caníbales o 12 Días

Instintos Caníbales o 12 Días (translated as Cannibal Instinct or 12 Days) is an unfinished novel by Mexican serial killer and cannibal José Luis Calva (June 20, 1969- December 11, 2007).

Calva had a very traumatic childhood; his father died when he was two years old and his mother brought men to her house, whom she forced him to call dad. A few years later, he was sexually abused by one of his brother’s friends. His early childhood may have been part of the reason he took the path that he ended up taking. He was married, having originally met his wife in 1996, but it ended in divorce and she ended up moving to the United States with his daughters.

Calva was arrested in October of 2007 when investigators went to his home regarding the case of his missing girlfriend, Alejandra Galeana, who had last been seen on October 6. When police arrived he was in the middle of a meal consisting of human flesh that he had seasoned with lemon. The police soon after found the mutilated body of Galeana. Also recovered from the scene was human flesh in the refrigerator, cooked human flesh, bones in a cereal box, a picture of Hannibal Lector and the unfinished novel Instintos Caníbales o 12 Días. He was charged with two murders, but more are suspected. Ultimately, he committed suicide in prison, just a few months after his arrest.

According to an article online, the novel deals with subjects like cannibalism, sex, sadomasochism, and coprophagia (the consumption of feces). The article also states that there may have been more texts including poetry and similar writings discovered at the scene, but this has not been officially confirmed.

Due to the nature of the texts and the person who wrote them, it is unlikely that they will ever be officially released.

Foodfight! Original Version

Conception for the first version of Foodfight! materialized in 1997, from Lawrence Kasanoff and Joshua Wexler, at the time, an employee of Threshold. In late 1997, Threshold applied for two trademarks for the "Foodfight!" name related to merchandising. A $25 million grant was issued on behalf of a Korean capital firm, at the request of Wexler, and an additional $50 million was expected through various product placement and pre-sale market hype of the film. With cash in hand, development of the film began in 2002. CGI and voice-over work took place at Threshold's Santa Monica, California studio. Threshold thought that the pre-theft version was going to showcase the uniqueness and ability of their studio. Critics and investors were initially so confident in the film that some of them actually called Threshold "the next-generation Pixar. "However, the film reached an impasse in development in December 2002. Hard drives containing the film's progress were reportedly stolen, leading to the entire film having to be made over again from scratch. As the majority of the budget was already spent on licensing products, mascots, actors, and production, it was given a new "live-action" take and was produced on a very restricted budget, using the insufficient software. Attempts were made to release Foodfight! by 2005. In 2007, a distribution deal was struck, but soon fell threw as no one knew when the movie could be released. In 2011, the remaining assets of the film were put up for auction at a starting bid of $2.5 million. Boulevard Entertainment ended up winning the assets for Foodfight! and worked to release the film.

The finished product was released on June 15, 2012, but was met with negative reception.

Toon Makers’ Sailor Moon

In 1993, the animation studio Toon Makers intended to produce an "Americanized" version of the popular Japanese anime series Sailor Moon. A 17-minute-long pilot episode, combining animation with a live-action film of the Sailor Scout characters as American teenagers, was completed, along with an additional 3 episodes that were in development. The main animation plot of the pilot involved Queen Beryl attacking the Jupiter and the girls had to return to space to fight back. Toon Makers had hoped to entice Bandai and Saban into producing a full series to air on FOX Saturday mornings starting in 1994. However, for unknown reasons the project was rejected in favor of a dubbed version of the original Japanese anime.

A two-minute promotional "music video" was made, showcasing the live cast, the animated characters, and the theme music, but ultimately the deal fell through and FOX instead aired dubbed versions of the original Japanese episodes. It has since been uploaded online.

Because of the campy live-action elements, the show has been given the derogatory nickname "Saban Moon", due to the fact that it heavily resembled shows affiliated with Haim Saban (such as a noted resemblance to She-Ra: Princess of Power) that would have been made during the early years of Power Rangers.

While the music video has been seen at conventions, the full 17-minute version of the pilot has never been publicly released. The two-minute theme music video was occasionally shown for promotional purposes after the Toon Makers series was cancelled. A notable presentation was made at Anime Expo 1998 by Allen Hastings (whose company, NewTek, made the graphics software in which Toon Makers had rendered some of the animations).

Interestingly, the music video ends with a Sailor Moon logo that would later be reused for the American dubs of the series, as well as all of its merchandise. The Toon Makers video was its first appearance, and the logo remains its only animated legacy.

In late 2012, the contents of a California storage locker rented by Raymond Lacovacci of Toon Makers were sold after he was arrested on physical battery charges. Among the contents of the locker were concept art, original animation cels, and other artwork related to the American Sailor Moon project. Also, a script (ostensibly the one used for the pilot's voice work) was sold and has since been put online.

The Sailor Moon franchise is legally held by many parties. Kodansha oversees the manga, TOEI holds the power to revoke or grant any licenses to the anime and live-action series worldwide, and Bandai holds the rights for merchandising and video games, with series creator Naoko Takeuchi essentially having the final say over any decision that is made by any of these companies.

Toon Makers was temporarily granted the adaptation rights to Sailor Moon in order to pitch their version of it. As with most adaptations, Toon Makers was likely given a list of mandated changes, such as alternate names, terminology, and logo designs for use in the American market, explaining why the Toon Makers pilot shares a logo with DiC's dub.

The status of Toon Maker's existence is unknown at this time. There is no record of them having produced anything for the past few years, and their website has not been updated in a long time. This, combined with the production materials for the Sailor Moon pilot appearing on auction sites, seems to imply that Toon Maker has gone out of business.

Toon Makers' president and founder, Rocky Solotoff, said in a June 2001 interview that the company had returned the production materials to TOEI or Bandai and only had copies of said material for personal reference. It's likely to assume that, if anyone owns the footage, it is in the hands of either an ex-Toon Makers employee, TOEI, or Bandai.

Solotoff later went on to confirm in a December 2016 interview with Bleeding Cool News that Toon Makers did indeed have a vault copy of the entirety of the pilot episode on hand. However, reportedly, it is part of their demo reel and thus cannot be shown to anybody other than interested parties.

Solotoff did not make a concrete statement at the time as to whether or not Toon Makers was defunct or still operating, thus it can not be known if the demo reel is even still accessible to any would-be clients.

In addition, Solotoff stated that any rumors of the pilot publicly circulating in any form were false. He went on to say that once the project was done the rights for it reverted back to one of the associate companies, but it is uncertain which one, placing it in copyright limbo.

Freaky Flickers

Freaky Flickers: Quest for the Golden Flicker, based on the Freaky Flickers toyline, was to be a CGI animated film directed, written, and animated by Cary Howe. The film detailed the adventures of Aargh the Pirate and his crew of Flickers on a quest to find the "Golden Flicker" to pay off the debt of their creator, Doc Flick.

Production began in 2005 as a possible television series but later developed into a 90-minute feature film around February 2009. Despite it being written, directed, and animated by a single person and only having a budget of about $250,000, it was recommended to be made into a theatrical feature, in which Howe was reluctant at first, but later agreed to do so, and Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer decided to release the film in about 2,800 theaters.

On 9 June 2009, after Howe worked all night, he left editor David Kann with the film in his living room and went to sleep. He awoke just before 8 pm to discover that the film, all film backups, and his film equipment had been stolen by his associate and creator of the original toyline, Peter Gantner.[1]

Aside from the trailer and one scene from the movie's official Flickr (one being a PSA about saving energy and recycling)[2], no footage of the movie has been released, and it's unknown what Gantner did with the stolen material.

Totally Twisted Fairy Tales

Totally Twisted Fairy Tales is a set of four short films planned by Disney/Walt Disney TV Animation and MovieToons in the late 1990's that were meant to be new takes on classic fairy tales. Out of the four planned, only "Redux Riding Hood" and "The Three Pigs" were released and have been shown at several animation festival screenings, but "Redux Riding Hood" is the only short that can be found by the general public. "Jack in the Beanstalk" and an unnamed fourth short were unreleased. It's unknown if "Jack in the Beanstalk" was even finished.

According to Steve Moore, "The Three Pigs" places the pigs in a "Real World" parody episode. They live in a loft and take in a wolf as a roommate in an attempt to be contemporary, open-minded pigs. The wolf is played by Harvey Fierstein, and he swears he's a vegan but comes out as a carnivore later. It was directed and written by Darrell Rooney and has the running time of 20 minutes. Despite calling it "hilarious", Steve Moore reportedly doesn't have a copy, though Jerry Beck has said he will look for it. The Moxy Show, also known as The Moxy Pirate Show and The Moxy & Flea Show, was a CGI animated anthology series developed by Colossal Pictures and produced by Hanna-Barbera for Cartoon Network. It began airing on December 5th, 1993 and ended on January 2nd, 2000. It was an anthology series of classic cartoons that Cartoon Network commonly aired back in the early 1990s, and in-between them were interstitials of Moxy (Bobcat Goldthwait), a goofing off, fun-loving dog who has a crush on Melody from Josie and the Pussycats, and Flea (Penn Jillette in the show, Chris Rock in the "Moxy & Flea" pilot), a flea who likes to hang out and watch TV with Moxy.

According to the website NickandMore, the show was a "whimsical mesh" of retro pop culture and comedy. Betty Cohen described it as "The premise is that Moxy's the toon who didn't quite make it, so we gave him a job as a janitor at the Cartoon Network", adding that for The Moxy Pirate Show, "he jams our signal once a week". A New York Times article from 1993 can also be found online, which further explains the motion capture CGI process that was used for the series.

The format was originally motion capture CGI from 1993-1998 but then traditional hand-drawn animation with CGI and live-action effects from 1998-2000, which may have had something to do with how Colossal Pictures stopped working on it by that point, which in itself could have been because of something to do with Chapter 11 bankruptcy in their company in Winter 1997. It is considered the very first Cartoon Network original series barring the fact that it was an anthology series based around re-existing cartoon shorts; the first fully produced Cartoon Network original series was Space Ghost Coast to Coast.

As mentioned earlier, the series originally began as The Moxy Pirate Show and only featured Moxy before adding Flea in 1994. Then it was retitled The Moxy Show in 1995 and The Moxy & Flea Show in 1998 with changes like:

  • Moxy's design changing into green/black striped shirt, black jeans and non palette-swapped shoes and having no whiskers or freckles, a black nose and smaller eyes.
  • Flea's design changing into a blue fez, yellow eyes with red pupils and growth in size to half the height of Moxy, as well as now being voiced by Chris Rock.
  • The opening sequence widely changed from the original sequence, as seen in the video below.
  • The shortening of the timeslot from an hour to thirty minutes.
  • The show (at least during its CGI run) is considered to be the first "real-time" or "live" cartoon, though it was never broadcast directly live. Through motion capture, a puppeteer would act out Moxy's motions while Goldthwait provided the voice and a technician would control the facial expressions.

In a 2003 online IGN interview, Andy Merrill (who worked on the show) talked about how Moxy (incorrectly spelt "Moxie") was apparently unpopular and unsuccessful with audiences despite being on the air for seven years. Reruns stopped on April 1st, 2000, which was the same day where all of the classic cartoon programmings was moved from Cartoon Network to Boomerang except for this series, and it hasn't been seen on Cartoon Network, Boomerang or home media releases of any kind since, and not even during Cartoon Network's 20th anniversary.

Gremlins Cartoon

Very little is known about the pilot for the animated TV adaptation of Joe Dante's film Gremlins, possibly titled Gizmo and the Gremlins. According to some sources, such as Toonarific, the series was to involve Gizmo, the one good Mogwai of the film and its sequel, fighting against the evil Gremlins. The pilot was the only episode that entered production.

It has been suggested that the series was cancelled because of parents complaining about the violence of the source material, but Joe Dante, the director of the films, says it was never finished because Gremlins 2 flopped at the box office. No footage of the pilot has been released, though there was a mention of it in an article in a 1990 issue of Bugs Bunny Magazine.

Mess O' Blues

Mess O' Blues is an original short film about a "over the hill aging rock star who thinks he's Elvis" created by Van Partible in 1993 for his senior thesis project that would serve as a basis for the Cartoon Network original show Johnny Bravo.

While working at Loyola Marymount University, Partible decided to pursue a career in animation, and so he started working on a senior thesis project intitled Mess O' Blues. Partible started with the concept of three Elvis Presley impersonators (or "Elvi" as Van Partible puts it) who fought crime. However, due to his time constraints and the fact that he was doing all of the work himself, the idea was cut down to just one Elvis impersonator.

Dan McLaughin (Partible's animation professor) showed the short to a friend working at Hanna-Barbera Productions. The studio saw the short and loved it so much they asked Partible if he could do a pitch for a seven-minute short cartoon, with Mess O' Blues as the inspiration. This became the original Johnny Bravo short.