Difference between revisions of "Windows XP (lost unlicensed Famicom game based on Windows operating system; 2003)"

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==Background==
 
==Background==
The ''Windows XP'' Famicom game was one of several bootleg Famicom or NES games that were released in the early-2000s. Other games have replicated ''Windows 98'' and ''Windows 2000'', with similar content and interaction.<ref>[https://www.brokenjoysticks.net/2016/02/11/broken-bootlegs-windows-98-famicom/ ''Broken Joysticks'' detailing the other ''Windows'' bootleg Famicom games.] Retrieved 1 Nov '21</ref> Based on analysis of its "BIOS screen", this Famicom game was likely established in 2003. This means it was created not long after the ''XP'' operating system itself was first released, on 25th October, 2001.<ref>[https://www.techradar.com/uk/news/windows-xp-turns-20-why-its-time-to-say-goodbye ''Techradar'' noting the ''Windows XP'' release date of 25th October, 2001.] Retrieved 1 Nov '21</ref>
+
The ''Windows XP'' Famicom game was one of several bootleg Famicom or NES games that were released in the early-2000s. Other games have replicated ''Windows 98'' and ''Windows 2000'', with similar content and interaction.<ref>[https://www.brokenjoysticks.net/2016/02/11/broken-bootlegs-windows-98-famicom/ ''Broken Joysticks'' detailing the other ''Windows'' bootleg Famicom games.] Retrieved 1 Nov '21</ref> Based on analysis of its "BIOS screen", this Famicom game was likely established in 2003. This means it was created not long after the ''XP'' operating system itself was first released, on October 25th, 2001.<ref>[https://www.techradar.com/uk/news/windows-xp-turns-20-why-its-time-to-say-goodbye ''Techradar'' noting the ''Windows XP'' release date of October 25th, 2001.] Retrieved 1 Nov '21</ref>
  
The bootleg as the game's title suggests replicates much of the operating system, including the loading and BIO screens. Oddly however, the menu screen is not of ''XP'' but of its predecessor ''2000''. Analysis of the menu screenshot suggests that one could interact via playing a game and being able to access Outlook Express and Internet Explorer.
+
The bootleg as the game's title suggests replicates much of the operating system, including the loading and BIO screens. Oddly, however, the menu screen is not of ''XP'' but of its predecessor ''2000''. Analysis of the menu screenshot suggests that one could interact via playing a game and being able to access Outlook Express and Internet Explorer.
  
 
Nothing is officially known regarding its development, including the identities of the creators behind it. However, some sources like ''Gamesniped'' have suggested that it might have been created by the same people that developed the ''98'' Famicom game.<ref>[http://gamesniped.com/2013/10/17/windows-xp-for-your-famicom-not-really/ ''Gamesniped'' article on ''Windows XP'', suggesting it could have been developed by the same people who created the ''Windows 98'' Famicom counterpart.] Retrieved 1 Nov '21</ref> If this is true, the game's creator would have been Bei Tongfang.<ref>[https://www.arcade-history.com/?n=microsoft-windows-98&page=detail&id=76488 ''Gaming-History'' crediting Bei Tongfang as being behind the ''Windows 98'' Famicom game.] Retrieved 1 Nov '21</ref>
 
Nothing is officially known regarding its development, including the identities of the creators behind it. However, some sources like ''Gamesniped'' have suggested that it might have been created by the same people that developed the ''98'' Famicom game.<ref>[http://gamesniped.com/2013/10/17/windows-xp-for-your-famicom-not-really/ ''Gamesniped'' article on ''Windows XP'', suggesting it could have been developed by the same people who created the ''Windows 98'' Famicom counterpart.] Retrieved 1 Nov '21</ref> If this is true, the game's creator would have been Bei Tongfang.<ref>[https://www.arcade-history.com/?n=microsoft-windows-98&page=detail&id=76488 ''Gaming-History'' crediting Bei Tongfang as being behind the ''Windows 98'' Famicom game.] Retrieved 1 Nov '21</ref>

Latest revision as of 01:37, 1 May 2022

Windowsxpfamicom1.jpg

The game's loading screen.

Status: Lost

Windows XP is a bootleg Famicom game believed to have been released in 2003. As its title suggests, the game replicates the Windows XP operating system for the 8-bit console.

Background[edit | edit source]

The Windows XP Famicom game was one of several bootleg Famicom or NES games that were released in the early-2000s. Other games have replicated Windows 98 and Windows 2000, with similar content and interaction.[1] Based on analysis of its "BIOS screen", this Famicom game was likely established in 2003. This means it was created not long after the XP operating system itself was first released, on October 25th, 2001.[2]

The bootleg as the game's title suggests replicates much of the operating system, including the loading and BIO screens. Oddly, however, the menu screen is not of XP but of its predecessor 2000. Analysis of the menu screenshot suggests that one could interact via playing a game and being able to access Outlook Express and Internet Explorer.

Nothing is officially known regarding its development, including the identities of the creators behind it. However, some sources like Gamesniped have suggested that it might have been created by the same people that developed the 98 Famicom game.[3] If this is true, the game's creator would have been Bei Tongfang.[4]

Availability[edit | edit source]

Unlike 98 and 2000, this bootleg game has never been officially dumped on the internet. In October 2013, it was reported that a copy was sold on eBay for $89 after 11 bids were made,[5] with its location originally being in Bangkok, Thailand.[6] The sale of this copy gives hope that the game might publicly resurface. As of the present day, only a few screenshots confirm its existence.

Gallery[edit | edit source]

Images[edit | edit source]

Videos[edit | edit source]

Stuff We Play video on the Windows 98 Famicom game.
Stuff We Play video on the Windows 2000 Famicom game.
Vargskelethor Joel video on the Windows 98 Famicom game.


External Link[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]