The Origin of Stretch Armstrong (partially found action figure-licensed comic book; 1992)


(Redirected from The Origin of Stretch Armstrong (rare action figure-licensed comic book; 1992))

The Origin of Stretch Armstrong
The box of a Stretch Armstrong that included the comic
The box of a Stretch Armstrong that included the comic
Status Partially Found

Stretch Armstrong is an action figure introduced by Kenner in 1976. The figure could stretch up to four feet, and bend into different poses, then stretch and bend back into his original shape. Kenner stopped producing him in 1980, though a few attempts to reintroduce him have occurred since then.

From 1992-1997, Cap Toys relaunched Stretch Armstrong as a pliable superhero, with a variety of other aliases. Initially, this figure also came with a free comic book detailing his origin. As of February 2016, only the first and last pages have turned up online, since advertiser Scott Edwards shared them on his Pinterest page some time in 2015. From this scan, the comic appears to have ran at least eight pages total, and traced Stretch Armstrong's journey to find his estranged father. Aside from Stretch becoming part of a crime fighting team (none of whom, except for Stretch and his dog Fetch Armstrong, actually received their own toys) before the story's end, the rest of the plot remains unknown. Sometimes a listing for a Stretch figure that comes with the book turns up on eBay, but not as often as a listing for only the toy does.

Hasbro purchased Cap Toys in 1997, making them the current owners of the Stretch Armstrong trademark (and through an earlier merger with Kenner's parent company Tonka, the owners of all of Kenner's most famous toys). Hasbro has also made a few attempts to translate Stretch into other media: An un-produced live-action movie, a short-lived comic exploring the worlds of different Hasbro-owned toys, a cartoon on Netflix. Details revealed about these projects - including some animatics and artwork - do not make it seem like any of them followed the plot of this comic.

External Links

Comments


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Dsneybuf

19 months ago
Score 0++
I also found an article detailing some commercials I vaguely remember watching, but haven't seen anyone post online. However, I didn't think it sounded too relevant to this comic: http://playb...10-19950102/
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Anonymous user #1

14 months ago
Score 1++
Why comic books? So should I post something about a lost hotwheels car? I thought this was only about shows and games
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Reynard

14 months ago
Score 0++
Comics matter too. They are media.
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Dsneybuf

11 months ago
Score 2++
The moderator of Stretch Armstrong World offered to send me scans, after he digs up one of his copies of the comic again. Could I post them here, or would we need permission from the cartoonist?
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SputnicK

11 months ago
Score 0++
You should be able to post it here
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Anonymous user #2

12 days ago
Score 0++
Any update on that?
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Gorillaz27

11 days ago
Score 0++
Anon 2, this is the part when I tell you that this guy was lying about having contact w/ the guy he mentioned.
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