Star Trek: Phase II (partially found material from unproduced television series; 1977-1978)

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Phase2-enterprise-2.png

USS Enterprise design for Star Trek: Phase II

Status: Partially Found

Star Trek: Phase II was intended to be the second live-action Star Trek television series. The series would have aired in 1978 on the Paramount Television Service (PTS), an attempted fourth network from Paramount Pictures (Paramount had previously had another network from 1948 to 1956, the Paramount Television Network).

Background

Star Trek was a science fiction television series that aired on NBC from 1966 to 1969. The series struggled for ratings during its three seasons. However, when the show entered syndication, it became a massive success. An animated spin-off, Star Trek: The Animated Series, aired on NBC for two seasons in 1973 and 1974. During this time, Paramount and series creator Gene Roddenberry attempted to create various continuations of the series for both film and television, none of which made it past pre-production.

In 1977, Paramount purchased the Hughes Television Network and formed the Paramount Television Service. The new Star Trek series was announced to begin airing in February 1978 with a television movie and would be the first program for the network.

Cancelation

The launch of PTS was then delayed to Fall 1978 and was eventually cancelled. Despite this, Paramount still was considering to film a pilot and attempt to sell it as a series to either ABC, CBS or NBC. However, Paramount worried about losing control of the project to the network and decided to change the pilot television movie into a feature film. Additionally, the success of Star Wars proved the commercial viability of a Star Trek feature film.

In 1995, Paramount finally launched their own network, the United Paramount Network (UPN), and its first program was Star Trek: Voyager.

A fan series was started in 2008 titled Star Trek: Phase II. In 2016, it was retitled Star Trek: New Voyages.

Cast

  • William Shatner as Admiral James T. Kirk
  • DeForest Kelley as Dr. Leonard “Bones” McCoy
  • James Doohan as Commander Montgomery “Scotty” Scott
  • David Gautreax as Commander Xon
  • Nichelle Nichols as Lt. Nyota Uhura
  • George Takei as Lt. Hikaru Sulu
  • Persis Khambatta as Lt. Ilia
  • Walter Koenig as Lt. Pavel Chekov
  • Majel Barrett as Dr. Christine Chapel
  • Grace Lee Whitney as Yeoman Janice Rand
  • Stephen Collins as Captain Willard Decker (was not officially announced when the series was cancelled)


The way various characters were to have been portrayed were later used in Star Trek: The Next Generation. The characters of Xon, Ilia and Decker would become Lt. Commander Data (played by Brent Spiner), Counselor Deanna Troi (played by Marina Sirtis) and Commander William T. Riker (played by Jonathan Frakes). Additionally, the way Kirk would have been portrayed in the series as a more experienced member of the crew is similar to Captain Jean-Luc Picard (played by Patrick Stewart).

Additionally, the characters of Ilia and Decker are major characters in Star Trek: The Motion Picture, and are still played by Khambatta and Collins. However, they are both killed off by the end of the movie.

Episodes

  • “In Thy Image” (television movie pilot, became Star Trek: The Motion Picture)
  • “Tomorrow and the Stars”
  • “Cassandra”
  • “The Child” (remade as an episode of Star Trek: The Next Generation)
  • “Kitumba”
  • “Practice in Waking”
  • “Deadlock”
  • “Savage Syndrome”
  • “Are Unheard Melodies Sweet?”
  • “Devil’s Due” (remade as an episode of Star Trek: The Next Generation)
  • “Lord Bobby’s Obsession”
  • “To Attain the All”
  • “The War to End All Wars”


As mentioned above, “The Child” became an episode of The Next Generation, this was due to the 1988 Writers Guild of America strike. The only change was exchanging Ilia for Troi. “Devil’s Due” was simply chosen to become an episode of the series.

Produced Material

Test footage was shot of both Gautreax and Khambatta. This footage is available on the DVD release of The Director’s Cut of Star Trek: The Motion Picture and the short film documentary The Lost Enterprise.

Concept art was also produced of what sets, ships and costumes for the series would have looked like.

Scripts were written for each of the episodes mentioned above. It is unknown how much, if any, footage was shot of them. It is possible that “In Thy Image” had some footage shot before becoming reformatted as a feature film. If it did, it is unknown what was. It is also possible that more test footage was shot, but not released to the public.

Images

Available Footage

The Lost Enterprise documentary about the aborted series showing test footage of Gautreaux as Xon (9:19), the engineering room (10:36) and Khambatta as Ilia (10:54).

External Links