1980-present NASCAR Cup Series (partially found footage of NASCAR races; 1980-present)

From The Lost Media Wiki
Revision as of 14:13, 5 November 2023 by SpaceManiac888 (talk | contribs)
(diff) ← Older revision | Latest revision (diff) | Newer revision → (diff)
Jump to: navigation, search
1983southern5001.jpg

Program for the 1983 Southern 500.

Status: Partially Found

By the 1980s, ABC, CBS, ESPN, and other television companies fully broadcast most NASCAR races, including from the Cup Series and other divisions. Most were also subject to home recordings, which have since resurfaced on platforms such as YouTube. This article documents the small proportion of events whose broadcasts have either been declared missing, or whose existence has been disputed.

1981 Coca-Cola 500 (FOUND)

The 1981 Coca-Cola 500 was the 5th race of the 1981 NASCAR Winston Cup Series. Occurring on 15th March at the Atlanta International Raceway, the race would ultimately be won by Cale Yarborough in a Buick, controlling the race after taking the lead from fellow Buick driver Harry Gant.

It was the 22nd running of the event, with the annual race typically lasting around 500 miles in length.[1] It was one of two 1981 Winston Cup races at Atlanta International Raceway, the other being the Atlanta Journal 500,[2] which occurred on 8th November and was won by Neil Bonnett in a Ford.[3] It was the first instance of the event gaining the Coca-Cola title sponsorship, which lasted until 1985.[4][5] The Coca-Cola 500 also has ties to the modern Quaker State 400, which resumed the event at a 400-mile length in 2021 after not being held from 2011-2020.[6][7][5]

Prior to the race, qualifying commenced with Terry Labonte winning the pole position in a Buick with a speed of 162.94 mph.[1] Directly behind him was Harry Gant, with Oldsmobile driver Buddy Baker lining up third.[1] Cale Yarborough qualified only 17th out of 42 competitors.[1] Also before the event, Bill Gazaway, the Director of Racing Operations for NASCAR, announced new rules for spoilers, including one that limited the rear-end spoiler height to a maximum of one and five-eighths inches. The rules were incorporated into the Cup Series primarily to tackle the competitive advantage of Bobby Allison's Pontiac LeMans, with some deeming the car controversial.[8] Allison himself only qualified 30th for this race.[1]

The Race

With the starting order decided, the 1981 Coca-Cola 500 commenced on 15th March.[1] Gant shot into the lead on the first lap, holding it for the first 22 laps.[1] After the first position was then fought between Pontiac's Richard Childress, Ford's Benny Parsons, and Chevrolet's David Pearson, Darrell Waltrip took the lead and held it for 26 laps in a Buick.[1] Richard Petty then passed him on lap 55, defending the first position for 25 laps before dropping it back to Waltrip.[1] But as the race entered its middle stages, it appeared the three main contenders were Yarborough, Gant, and Ford's Neil Bonnett, the latter leading for 84 laps overall.[1] Meanwhile, Petty and Waltrip dropped out of contention after suffering engine failures after 113 and 131 laps respectively.[1]

On lap 218, Yarborough overtook Parsons for the first position, Bonnett having successfully defended it for 48 laps.[1] Gant then took over a lap later, with Bonnett retiring after 234 laps after experiencing water pump issues.[1] Therefore, the battle for the lead generally centred around Gant and Yarborough, who achieved a few further lead changes until the latter made the final one on lap 282.[1] For the remaining 47 laps, Yarborough generally extended his leading, crossing the line with a 33-second margin to claim victory and $28,950 in prize money.[1] Gant finished second, while Dale Earnhardt took third in a Pontiac.[1]

1981 CRC Chemicals 500

The 1981 CRC Chemicals 500 was the 25th race of the 1981 NASCAR Winston Cup Series. Occurring on 20th September at the Dover Downs International Speedway, the race would ultimately be won by Neil Bonnett in a Ford, having lapped the entire field prior to the finish.

It was the 11th running of the event, with the annual race typically lasting around 500 miles in length.[9] It was one of two 1981 Winston Cup races at Dover Downs International Speedway, the other being the Mason-Dixon 500,[2] which occurred on 17th May and was won by Jody Ridley in a Ford.[10] It was the third instance of the event displaying title sponsor CRC Chemicals, which lasted until 1982.[11] The CRC Chemicals 500 also has ties to the Drydene 311, having been reduced in milage since 1997 and having not been held since 2020.[11]

Prior to the race, qualifying commenced with Ricky Rudd winning the pole position in a Chevrolet with a speed of 136.757 mph.[9] Directly behind him was Buick's Darrel Waltrip, with Neil Bonnett lining up third.[9]

The Race

With the starting order decided, the 1981 CRC Chemicals 500 commenced on 20th September.[9] Rudd maintained the lead from the start, and remained there for the first 54 laps before being overtaken by Buick's Richard Petty. Petty would then drop the first position to fellow Buick driver Bobby Allison, and aside from a brief lead change from Rudd, began to dominated the early stages, including leading from lap 62 to 122 uninterrupted.[9] Chevrolet's Dave Marcis briefly led on lap 123 before Allison led for the next eight laps.[9] However, Bonnett began to enter the race for the lead, and after brief leads from Petty, Waltrip, and Terry Labonte in a Buick, started controlling the race, leading 88 consecutive laps starting from lap 147.[9]

Pontiac driver Joe Ruttman then briefly led on lap 235 before Bonnett took over for the next 13.[9] Suddenly, Pontiac's Harry Gant began to challenge for the lead, succeeding in the overtake on lap 249.[9] He proved dominant for the next stage of the race, leading 160 consecutive laps.[9] Bonnett was determined to win however, and moved back into the first position on lap 409.[9] Gant nevertheless retook the lead on lap 420, and was defending the first position until his engine failed after 437 laps, putting him out of the running and giving Bonnett back the lead.[9] From there, Bonnett faced no further competition; in fact, for the remaining 63 laps, he would lap the entire field, eventually crossing the line a lap and 15 seconds ahead to claim victory and $19,000 in prize money.[9] Waltrip finished second, with Allison taking third.[9]

1982 Twin 125s

The 1982 Twin 125s are two races at the Daytona National Speedway that served as qualifying events for the 1982 Daytona 500. Both occurred on 11th February, where the first race was won by Cale Yarborough in a Buick, while fellow Buick driver Buddy Baker was victorious in the second. Whereas television coverage of the second race is widely accessible, footage of race 1 remains inaccessible.

The Twin 125s are unique races on the NASCAR Cup Series schedule. They consist of two qualifying heats that determine the majority of the 40 competitors for the Daytona 500.[12] It would also allow for the racers to analyse how their vehicles performed during the heats and modify them accordingly for the main event.[13] Since the 1982 Daytona 500 was the first of its the points-paying kind to officially start a NASCAR Cup Series, the Twin 125s would actually kickstart the season.[14]

The Races

Prior to the races, two drivers had already qualified. Benny Parsons in a Pontiac had won the pole position, while Harry Grant in a Buick qualified second, as both had set the fastest times in the time trial event.[15] In the first Twin 125s race, Yarborough was victorious, earning $18,000 in prize money after having led three of the 50 laps. Terry Labonte, also in a Buick, finished second, outpacing fellow Buick driver Bobby Allison, who had slipped to third after being in first for 32 laps.[16]

In race 2, Baker claimed the victory and the $18,000 after having led precisely half of the race. Waltrip and Ruttman finished second and third respectively, and because all three were also driving Buicks, it meant that both races had Buick drivers claim all steps of the podium.[17] With the starters and race order decided, the 1982 Daytona 500 commenced on February 14th. Allison ultimately redeemed himself by claiming victory in the race, ahead of Yarborough and Ruttman. Pole sitter Parsons crashed out on lap 103, while Baker finished eighth, two laps down from the leader.[15]

1982 Goody's Sportsman 300

The 1982 Goody's Sportsman 300 was the inaugural race of the NASCAR Budweiser Late Model Sportsman Series, now known as the Xfinity Series. Occurring on 13th February at the Daytona International Speedway, the race would ultimately be won by Dale Earnhardt, edging out fellow Pontiac driver Jody Ridley.

It kickstarted the NASCAR Budweiser Late Model Sportsman Series.[18] The Series was formed when Anheuser-Busch struck a deal with NASCAR to sponsor a series.[19] NASCAR in turn decided to merge the regional Sportsman series into a national touring series.[19] In modern times, it is known as the Xfinity Series,[20] providing a proving ground for up and comping drivers seeking to compete in the Cup Series, as well as feeder races for it.[19] The race itself, which lasted 300 miles,[21] has ties to the modern Beef. It's What's for Dinner. 300, having dropped the Goody's title from 1997 onwards.[22]

Prior to the race, qualifying commenced with Mike Porter winning the pole position in a Pontiac with a speed of 184.569 mph.[21] Directly behind him were fellow Pontiac drivers Geoffrey Bodine and Jody Ridley, in second and third respectively.[21] Dale Earnhardt qualified fifth out of 34 competitors,[21] having come off an unsuccessful 1980 Winston Cup Series campaign where he won no races or pole positions.[23][24] This may have impacted his confidence before the event, stating during preparations for the race, "I don't care who it is. When you've been accustomed to winning-winning big-and suddenly you're not anymore, it's going to make you feel down. That's human nature. It worries you and bothers you and gnaws at you inside."[23]

The Race

With the starting order decided, the 1982 Goody's Sportsman 300 commenced on 13th February.[21] Of this 120-lap, Earnhardt led the most at 52, with his main competition late in the race being Ridley.[24][18][21] For the final 15 laps, Earnhardt and Ridley duelled for the first position, with The Intimidator remaining in front.[24][18] On the final lap, Ridley made a few attempts to pass Earnhardt, but was thwarted because slower cars blocked the lower portion of the speedway, preventing him from making a substantial move.[24][18] Earnhardt therefore claimed victory and $14,740 in prize money.[24][18][21] Sam Ard finished third in an Oldsmobile;[21] he was reported as having a highlight-filled race, including missing his pit stop three times, and bashing into Mark Beard's Pontiac in the fourth attempt.[24][18]

Post-race, Earnhardt explained that the traffic was actually part of his game plan, stating "With about five laps to go, I started thinking about the last lap and what Jody would try to do. I realized I could probably use the traffic if I could time it right." This ultimately paid off for Earnhardt, with him noting "And I was backing off, trying to time the traffic. So we were both backing off. But the traffic did come in handy; Jody just didn't have anywhere to go to get around me."[24]

1982 Eastern 150

The 1982 Eastern 150 was the second race of the 1982 NASCAR Budweiser Late Model Sportsman Series. Occurring on 20th February at the Richmond Fairgrounds Raceway, the race would ultimately be won by Tommy Houston in a Pontiac. According to NASCAR on TV, this was the first NASCAR Budweiser Late Model Sportsman Series race to be televised.

It would be one of threes 1982 NASCAR Budweiser Late Model Sportsman Series to occur at Richmond Fairgrounds Raceway, with the race typically lasting 150 laps or 81.3 miles.[25][26] The others were the 1982 Spring 220, which occurred on 2nd May and was won by Pontiac's Butch Lindley;[27] and the other being the Harvest 150, which occurred on 11th September and was also won by Lindley.[28] The race would be discontinued in 1985, but was re-established in 1990, with the race now known as the ToyotaCare 250, having expanded to 250 laps from 1994 onwards.[29]

The Race

Prior to the race, qualifying commenced with Geoffrey Bodine winning the pole position in a Pontiac with a speed of 96.207 mph.[25] Directly behind him was Oldsmobile driver Sam Ard, with Jack Ingram's Pontiac lining up third.[25] Tommy Houston qualified 15th out of 28 runners.[25]

With the starting order decided, the 1982 Eastern 150 commenced on 20th February.[25] As the race reached 95 laps, Ard and Ingram both retired following an accident, with Bodine also crashing out four laps later.[25] Meanwhile, Houston climbed the order, eventually moving up to the first position ahead of fellow Pontiac drivers Bubba Nissen and Rick Mast.[25] He ultimately claimed victory and $5,000 in prize money, with Nissen and Mast taking second and third respectively.[25]

1982 CRC Chemicals 500

The 1982 CRC Chemicals 500 was the 24th race of the 1982 NASCAR Winston Cup Series. Occurring on 19th September at the Dover Downs International Speedway, the race would ultimately be won by Darrell Waltrip in a Buick, edging out Pontiac's Kyle Petty by half a length.

It was the 12th running of the event, with the race, like its 1981 predecessor, lasting around 500 miles in length.[30] It was one of two 1982 Winston Cup races at Dover Downs International Speedway, the other being the Mason-Dixon 500,[14] which occurred on 16th May and was won by Bobby Allison in a Chevrolet.[31]

Prior to the race, qualifying commenced with Ricky Rudd winning the pole position in a Pontiac with a speed of 139.384 mph, resulting in him completing a circuit in 25.828 seconds.[32][30] Directly behind him was Allison, with Darrell Waltrip lining up third.[32][30]

The Race

With the starting order decided, the 1982 CRC Chemicals 500 commenced on 19th September.[30] Rudd maintained the lead at the start, holding onto it until Waltrip passed him on lap 3.[30] Waltrip held onto the first position for 23 consecutive laps before Richard Petty in a Pontiac took over for a further 37 laps.[30] After some quick lead changes, Neil Bonnett in a Ford took over as the leader from laps 71 to 103.[30] A few laps later however, Ford's Dale Earnhardt began to control proceedings, firstly leading from 108 to 129, and then, following a few lead changes, led from 144 to 206.[30] During this period, Petty retired because of steering issues after 160 laps.[30]

Allison briefly led on lap 207, but Earnhardt resumed in the lead for another four laps.[30] Waltrip however began to surge back into leadership contention, overtaking the Intimidator on lap 212.[30] While Earnhardt and Buick's Harry Gant provided brief lead changes, Waltrip would lead a combined 170 laps from lap 212 to 401.[30] By the time Kyle Petty moved into the first position on lap 402, Bonnett had retired after 304 laps because of an ignition failure, while battery issues ended Earnhardt's race at 402.[30] Petty and Pontiac's Geoffery Bodine would provide the remaining challenges to Waltrip, the latter leading another 82 laps by the time the race finish, thus leading 287 overall.[30] Despite achieving the final lead change with 24 laps remaining, Waltrip nevertheless faced intense competition from Petty, culminating in the former finishing ahead of the latter by only half a length.[33][30] Waltrip therefore claimed victory and $29,600 in prize money, with Ford's Bill Elliot pipping Bodine for third.[33][30]

1982 Winston Western 500

The 1982 Winston Western 500 was the final race of the 1982 NASCAR Winston Cup Series. Occurring on 21st November at the Riverside International Raceway, the race would ultimately be won by Tim Richmond in a Buick, after having led 92 of the 119 laps. It also saw Buick's Darrell Waltrip win his second consecutive Cup Series title following rival and Pontiac driver Bobby Allison's retirement during the race. Additionally, it is claimed this was the first race to be televised by WTBS.

It was the 22nd running of the event, with the race lasting 500km or about 311.780 miles as the race utilised the metric system since 1976.[34][35] It was one of two 1982 Winston Cup races at Riverside International Raceway, the other being the Budweiser 400,[14] which occurred on 13th June and was won by Tim Richmond.[36] The annual race ran until 1987, before it was dropped off the Cup Series schedule a year later.[37] The raceway would later be dropped completely off the Winston Cup schedule following the 1988 Budweiser 400 as the land the raceway was on was being sold off so that housing and a shopping mall could be established on it.[38]

Prior to the race, qualifying commenced with Darrell Waltrip winning the pole position with a speed of 114.995 mph.[34] Directly behind him was title rival Bobby Allison, with the latter trailing Waltrip by 22 points heading into the final race.[39][34] If he were to win the race, Allison would have required Waltrip to finish fifth or lower to become champion.[34] Lining up third was Pontiac's Joe Ruttman, with Richmond qualifying fourth out of 42 competitors and aiming to achieve the Riverside double after having won the Budweiser 400 earlier in the year.[34][36]

The Race

With the starting order decided, the 1982 Winston Western 500 commenced on 21st November.[34] Waltrip shot into the lead on the first lap, leading the first four laps until Alison took over for the next four.[34] Richmond remained in contention however, taking the lead on lap 9 and holding onto it until lap 14.[34] The race then briefly had an open competition for the lead with four changes lasting fewer than five laps, before Richmond began to control the early stages, leading for 25 consecutive laps from lap 21.[34] Allison briefly interrupted proceedings on lap 46, but Richmond moved back into the first position two laps later to lead another 24.[34]

Waltrip then moved into the first position on lap 72, before Buick's Harry Gant overtook him on lap 76. But Richmond remained fully in control of the race, succeeding in overtaking Gant on lap 81. Aside from a brief interruption by Ford's Neil Bonnett on lap 97, Richmond defended the first position for the remainder of the race, claiming victory with a 7-second margin and $24,730 in prize money.[34] Pontiac's Ricky Rudd finished second; Waltrip finished third, claiming his second consecutive title and what would be his second of three championships,[40] after Allison retired after 111 laps following an engine failure, being classified in 16th.[34]

1983 Goody's Sportsman 300

The 1983 Goody's Sportsman 300 was the inaugural race of the 1983 NASCAR Budweiser Late Model Sportsman Series. Occurring on 19th February at the Daytona International Speedway, the race would ultimately be won by Darrell Waltrip, after he fended off fellow Pontiac driver Neil Bonnett via harnessing the presence of Dale Earnhardt's Pontiac. It was the second running of the race, with the annual event lasting 300 miles like its 1982 predecessor.[41] It was the only 1983 NASCAR Budweiser Late Model Sportsman Series race to take place at Daytona International Speedway[42]

Prior to the race, qualifying commenced with Sam Ard winning the pole position in an Oldsmobile.[43][41] Directly behind him was Pontiac's Joe Ruttman, with Oldsmobile's Morgan Shepherd lining up third.[41][43] Darrell Waltrip qualified fifth out of 40 competitors.[41][43]

The Race

With the starting order decided, the 1983 Goody's Sportsman 300 commenced on 19th February.[41] Shepherd shot into the lead on the first lap, but was passed by Ruttman on the next.[41] Ard regained the first position on lap 3 however, and was able to maintain it for 22 consecutive laps.[41] Meanwhile, after seven laps, Rodney Howard crashed his Pontiac heavily into the inside wall coming out of Turn 4, resulting in his vehicle flipping multiple times.[44][45][41] The impact forced him to be taken to the Halifax Hospital for assessment, where ultimately it was revealed he suffered no broken bones.[44]

When Ard lost the lead to Bobby Allison in a Pontiac, the race for the first position became an open affair, with few of the 22 lead changes lasting ten laps or more.[41] Shepherd however would move into the first position on lap 73, defending it for the longest duration of the race at 23 laps, dropping it to Waltrip on lap 96.[41] The end of the race was a battle between Waltrip, Pontiac's Geoffrey Bodine, Neil Bonnett, Pontiac's Phil Parsons, and Shepherd.[44] On the second-to-last lap, Waltrip passed Parsons for the first position, but faced intense pressure from Bodine.[44] On Turn 3 of the final lap, Bonnett attempted a move on Waltrip, dropping low to do so.[44] However, this would be thwarted by Earnhardt, whose Pontiac was seven laps down from the leaders because of a broken fan blade.[44][43] Instead of following Bonnett, he moved to a higher position and dropped behind Waltrip as the leaders negotiated Turns 3 and 4.[44][43] Earnhardt's presence would provide a boost for Waltrip, enabling him to fend off Bodine, Bonnett, and Parsons to claim victory and $16,100 in prize money.[44][43][41] Bodine finished second a car length behind, with Bonnett taking third, Parsons fourth, and Shepherd fifth after a close finish.[44][41]

Post-race, Waltrip revealed that his overtake of Parsons was actually a tactical mistake, but reckoned it ultimately contributed to him winning. He stated "I guess my mind just went blank. I thought the next-to-last lap was the last lap. So I decided to pass Parsons in the third turn of the next-to-last lap. Thank goodness Neil Bonnett followed me. In hindsight it probably won the race for me, because the rest of those guys sitting back there were probably very surprised at what I did. It probably messed up their thinking. Instead of being able to carry out their plans for the last lap, they had to go to something else."[44]

1983 Mason-Dixon 500

The 1983 Mason-Dixon 500 was the 10th race of the 1983 NASCAR Winston Cup Series. Occurring on 15th May at the Dover Downs International Speedway, the race would ultimately be won by Bobby Allison in a Buick, following a duel with Chevrolet driver Darrell Waltrip.

It was the 15th running of the event, with the annual race typically lasting around 500 miles in length.[46] It was one of two 1983 Winston Cup races at Dover Downs International Speedway, the other being the Budweiser 500,[47] which occurred on 18th September and was won by Bobby Allison.[48] The race also has ties to the modern DuraMAX Drydene 400, having dropped the Mason-Dixon title from 1984 and being reduced to 400 miles since 1998.[49]

Prior to the race, qualifying commenced with Joe Ruttman winning the pole position in a Buick with a record speed of 139.616 mph.[50][46] This proved an emotional occasion for Ruttman, as The New York Times reported that his father had died from a heart attack a day prior.[50] Directly behind Ruttman was Chevrolet's Ricky Rudd, with Pontiac's Tim Richmond lining up third.[46] Darrell Waltrip qualified fourth, while Bobby Allison lined up 10th out of 36 competitors.[46] Allison was seeking to tie the record number of wins at Dover, having won five previously, including the previous year's Mason-Dixon 500.[51]

The Race

With the starting order decided, the 1983 Mason-Dixon 500 commenced on 15th May.[46] Ruttman maintained his lead at the start, holding onto it for 49 laps before Richard Petty in a Pontiac briefly led on lap 50.[46] Not long afterwards, Allison began controlling the early stages, where with the exception of a few brief interruptions from Pontiac's Kyle Petty, Buick's Morgan Shepard, Ford's Dale Earnhardt, dominated the race up until lap 190.[46] From there, Waltrip took control from lap 190 to 243, his lead ended by Ruttman.[46] Earnhardt also proved to be in contention, leading from laps 248 to 273, before dropping it to Ford's Bill Elliott, who was then overtaken by Waltrip on lap 275.[46] Waltrip again controlled proceedings, leading for 77 consecutive laps.[46]

This stint was ended by Ruttman on lap 352, but Waltrip quickly moved back into the first position a lap later.[46] However, Allison drove back into contention, ultimately overtaking Waltrip on lap 361 and leading for 21 laps.[46] A few more overtakes between the pair occurred, before Allison controlled proceedings from laps 413 to 471.[46] This was disrupted however when Allison was forced to make a late pit stop, putting Waltrip ahead on lap 472.[52][46] Allison made a comeback however, overtaking Waltrip on lap 478, and while Waltrip moved back into the first position on lap 480, Allison returned to the first position again.[46] According to The New York Times, Allison also moved back in front on lap 490, with Waltrip still challenging for the next seven laps.[52] Ultimately, Allison was still ahead when the final caution occurred due to thunderstorms, which still was in effect on the last lap.[52][46] Thus, Allison claimed his sixth victory at Dover and $28,500 in prize money.[51][52][46] Waltrip finished second, with Ruttman a lap down in third.[46][52] Post-race, The New York Times reported that tragedy occurred when lightning strikes at the speedway killed two spectators and critically injured another.[52]

1983 Southern 500

The 1983 Southern 500 was the 22nd race of the 1983 NASCAR Winston Cup Series. Occurring on 5th September at the Darlington Raceway, the race would ultimately be won by Bobby Allison in a Buick, climbing the order after starting from 14th.

It was the 32nd running of the event, with the annual race typically lasting around 500 miles in length.[53] It was one of two 1983 Winston Cup races at Darlington Raceway, the other being the TranSouth 500,[47] which occurred on 10th April and was won by Harry Gant in a Buick.[54] The Southern 500 was typically held around Labor Day weekend; after the two Darlington races were merged into one 400 mile race for 2005,[55] the Southern 500's legacy would continue in modern times under the current name of the Cook Out Southern 500,[56] having returned back to its Labor Day weekend date from 2015.[55]

Prior to the race, qualifying commenced with Neil Bonnett winning the pole position in a Chevrolet with a speed of 157.187 mph.[53] Directly behind him were fellow Chevrolet drivers Terry Labonte and Lake Speed, in second and third respectively.[53] Allison qualified only 14th out of 41 competitors, but was nevertheless determined to finish ahead of Waltrip for the first time in four races, Waltrip having qualified seventh in a Chevrolet.[57][53] He was also seeking to achieve the Darlington double, having won the TranSouth 500 earlier in the year.[54]

The Race

With the starting order decided, the 1983 Southern 500 commenced on 5th September.[53] Bonnett controlled the race from the start, defending his lead for 80 laps until dropping it to Chevrolet's David Pearson.[53] Pearson led for 17 laps before dropping it to Ricky Rudd in a Chevrolet, who then dropped it to a fast-charging Allison on lap 100.[57][53] Nevertheless, the battle for the lead remained open until Waltrip led from laps 105 to 132.[53] Chevrolet's Cale Yarborough briefly led soon afterwards, only for Rudd to take charge and lead uninterrupted from laps 134 to 207.[53] This stint would be ended by Allison on lap 208, with him holding it for another 16 laps.[53]

Later in the race, Bonnett and Ford's Buddy Baker led for some time.[53] However, on lap 265, Allison overtook Bonnett from the first position and began to dominate the remainder of the race, leading 74 consecutive laps.[53] Bill Elliott overtook Allison in a Ford on lap 339, but the latter regained it three laps later.[53] He successfully protected it against Elliott to claim victory by a 9.38-second margin and $42,050 in prize money.[53][57] Elliott finished second, while Waltrip beat Bonnett for third.[53] This proved to be Allison's fourth victory of 1983 as well as his fourth Southern 500.[57]

1984 Goody's Sportsman 300

The 1984 Goody's Sportsman 300 was the inaugural race of the 1984 NASCAR Busch Grand National Series. Occurring on 18th February at the Daytona International Speedway, the race would ultimately be won by Darrell Waltrip, after passing Oldsmobile's Sam Ard with three laps to go.

It was the third running of the race, with the event again lasted 300 miles.[58] Like with 1983, it was the only 1984 NASCAR Busch Grand National Series race to take place at Daytona International Speedway,[59]

Prior to the race, qualifying commenced with L.D. Ottinger winning the pole position with a speed of 187.682 mph.[58] Directly behind him was Sam Ard, with Glenn Jarrett lining up third in a Ford.[58] Darrell Waltrip qualified fifth out of 40 competitors.[58]

The Race

With the starting order decided, the 1983 Goody's Sportsman 300 commenced on 18th February.[58] Ard shot into the lead on the first lap, holding it until lap 12 when Bobby Allison overtook him in an Oldsmobile.[58] On lap 3, a multicar crash involving Jarrett, Dale Earnhardt's Oldsmobile, and the Pontiacs of Geoffrey Bodine and Mike Alexander occurred when Earnhardt's car suffered an engine failure and spun.[60][58] Bodine was able to continue, but the rest had suffered terminal damage.[60][58]

The race had numerous and quick lead changes, with 35 in total, and the majority not lasting five laps or more.[58] Ard remained a consistent presence in the battle for the lead, however, and controlled the later stages by overtaking Bodine for the first position on lap 92.[58] He held it until lap 118, when Waltrip, who had not led a single lap up to that point, passed him for the lead.[58] Whereas Ard fell out of the podium places and finished fourth, Waltrip was able to maintain his lead for the final three laps against the Pontiac of Lake Speed.[58] He therefore claimed victory with a 2-feet margin and $18,060 in prize money. Speed finished second, with Bodine taking third.[58]

1984 Warner W. Hodgdon Carolina 500

The 1984 Warner W. Hodgdon Carolina 500 was the 3rd race of the 1984 NASCAR Winston Cup Series. Occurring on 4th March 1984 at North Carolina Speedway, the race would be won by Bobby Allison in a Buick, ending a bad start for his season. It was also alleged that the race was broadcast and syndicated by Special Events Television Network (SETN), which would have made it the first NASCAR race to have been broadcast by the network.

It would be one of two races held at North Carolina Speedway for the 1984 NASCAR Winston Cup Series,[61] the other being the 1984 Warner W. Hodgdon American 500, held on 21st November.[62] The North Carolina Speedway, under a new name of Rockingham Speedway, would host NASCAR races until 2004,[63] when it was removed from the schedule as a consequence of the Ferko lawsuit.[64] Heading into the race, defending Winston Cup champion Allison had endured misfortune in the opening two races, suffering a broken camshaft at the Daytona 500, and an engine failure at the Miller High Life 400.[65][66] He therefore was seeking to properly start his title defence at the Carolina 500, having won three races at the Speedway previously.[66]

Prior to the race, qualifying occurred, with Harry Gant in a Chevrolet winning the pole position ahead of fellow Chevrolet driver Darrell Waltrip and Ricky Rudd in a Ford. Allison could only manage 15th, with eventual 1984 Winston Cup champion Terry Labonte qualifying fifth in a Chevrolet.[67][68][69] Notably, Daytona 500 winner Cale Yarborough was absent from the event, deciding to withdraw after experiencing two major crashes at both North Carolina Motor Speedway events, injuring his knee and shoulder at the 1983 Warner W. Hodgdon American 500.[70] He refused to compete at the Speedway again until it was repaved; after learning about a track press release that falsely claimed Yarborough did not want to compete because of too much younger competition, Yarborough vowed not to compete at the track again.[66]

The Race

Nevertheless, the track was repaved prior to the race.[66] Despite an unremarkable qualifying performance, Allison was able to climb the order to lead 118 of the 492 laps. Labonte did overtake Allison on lap 439, but Allison quickly repassed his opponent, and held on to win the race and earn $33,150 in prize money.[65] Labonte finished second, with fellow Chevrolet driver Lake Speed taking third. Ford driver Dick Brooks led the most laps at 169, but retired on lap 384 following engine failure. There were six cautions throughout the race, resulting in 42 caution laps in total, with five drivers having retired because of accidents.[67][68][69] One in particular saw an altercation between Lennie Pond and Earnhardt's relief driver Connie Saylor.[71]

1984 Delaware 500

The 1984 Delaware 500 was the 24th race of the 1984 NASCAR Winston Cup Series. Occurring on 16th September 1984 at Dover International Speedway, the race primarily consisted of a duel between title contenders Harry Gant and Terry Labonte, with Gant edging out his opponent.

It was the 2nd occasion that a race was held at Dover International Speedway during the 1984 NASCAR Winston Cup Series,[61] with another race, the Budweiser 500, having been won by Richard Petty on 20th May.[72] The track itself is a mainstay of the NASCAR Cup Series, with the latest race having occurred on 16th May 2021 under the new name Drydene 400.[73] Heading into the race, qualifying was ultimately rained out according to Ultimate Racing History.[74] Nevertheless, Labonte won the pole position, ahead of fellow Chevrolet drivers Dale Earnhardt and Gant.[74][75]

The Race

Based on the number of laps led, the battle for the first position was primarily between Gant and Labonte. Labonte led for 104 laps, and over the course of the race, the lead changed 19 times between the duo, Ron Bouchard, Earnhardt, Rusty Wallace, Trevor Boys, Ricky Rudd, Darrell Waltrip, and Bobby Allison.[74][75] However, Gant was primarily in control, leading 281 of the 500 laps to claim victory and $40,005 in prize money.[74] He finished ahead of Labonte, and Ford driver Rudd. The race featured 10 cautions for a total of 73 laps, with nine retiring due to accidents.[74][75] The most serious crash involved Allison, who slammed his Buick into the wall at the exit of turn 4 at over 140mph, bending the car's seat and breaking one of his shoulder blades. Despite claims he would need four weeks of recovering, Allison was able to compete one week later, at the 1984 Goody's 500.[76]

By winning the race, Gant collected 185 points, 10 of those being bonus points because he led the most laps. He outscored Labonte by ten points, thus helping his title chances.[75] Ultimately, Labonte won the 1984 Winston Cup with 4,508 points, 65 ahead of Gant, who ended up runners-up.[77]

1985 Twin 125s

The 1985 Twin 125s are two races at the Daytona National Speedway that served as qualifying events for the 1985 Daytona 500. Both occurred on 14th February, where the first race was won by Bill Elliott in a Ford, while Cale Yarborough also driving a Ford was victorious in the second. According to reports, Elliot's victory was one of the most dominant qualifier victories in NASCAR history, and he would go on to win that year's Daytona 500.

Among those competing was Yarborough, who was seeking to defend his Daytona 500 title. Prior to the races, two drivers had already qualified for the Daytona 500.[78] Elliot won the pole position by setting a stock-car speed record of 205.114 m.p.h.,[78] while Yarborough would start second.[79]

The Races

In the first race, Elliott was victorious and claimed $22,000 in prize money, ahead of the Chevrolets of Darrell Waltrip and Benny Parsons in second and third respectively.[80] The Los Angeles Times reported on the dominance of Elliot's win. Leading 48 of the 50 laps, he finished more than two miles ahead of Darrell Waltrip, with a 37-second margin that became the widest victory in Twin 125s history. The report speculated that had there been a few more laps, Elliott could have also lapped Waltrip. The performance amazed most of Elliot's fellow competitors. Elliot himself stated that he aimed to run the car as hard as possible to prepare for the Sunday race, potentially racing against defending Winston Cup champion Terry Labonte, who dropped out of race 1 after leading on lap 8 with engine issues.[78]

For race 2, Yarborough followed David Pearson's Chevrolet for the last 24 laps, before overtaking on the final lap after utilising his rival's draft, thus claiming the $22,000.[81] Kyle Petty finished third in a Ford. The race featured two cautions, including a spin by Dick Skillen on lap 22, while a five-car accident Clark Dwyer, Ken Ragan, Randy LaJoie, Trevor Boys and Dean Roper meant six laps were dedicated to clearing the wreckage.[78] Yarborough dominated the early stages of the race too, and stated that he had planned to pass Pearson earlier, but decided to make an early move on the final lap with the intent to surprise his opponent. Pearson admitted that he had little chance to defend his lead. Kyle Petty and his father Richard were able to finish third and fourth due to a final turn incident involving Harry Gant and Phil Parsons.[78][81]

With the starters and race order decided, the 1985 Daytona 500 commenced on 17th February. Elliott converted his promising win with a victory at the main event, after having led 136 laps. He became only the third driver in eleven years to have won the Daytona 500 after having achieved victory in a Twin 125s event.[78] He finished ahead of Lake Speed in a Pontiac, and Waltrip. Yarborough retired on lap 62 following engine issues.[79]

1986 Twin 125s

The 1986 Twin 125s are two races at the Daytona National Speedway that served as qualifying events for the 1986 Daytona 500. Both occurred on 13th February, where the first race was won by Bill Elliott in a Ford, while Dale Earnhardt driving a Chevrolet was victorious in the second. Earnhardt's win was the first Twin 125s victory for Richard Childress Racing, serving as a prelude to Earnhardt and the team going on to win every qualifying race during the 1990s.

Among those competing was Elliott, who was not only seeking to defend his Daytona 500 title but also aiming to replicate his 1985 Twin 125s win. Prior to the races, two drivers had already qualified for the Daytona 500, with Elliot winning the pole position and Geoff Bodine in a Chevrolet qualifying second after setting the best time trial performances.[82]

The Races

In the first Twin 125s race, Elliott was victorious once again and claimed $22,000 in prize money, ahead of Bobby Allison in a Buick and Terry Labonte in an Oldsmobile in second and third respectively.[83] Allison was leading Elliott heading into the final lap when they came across to lap Allison's son Davey. Davey attempted to move his Chevrolet away from the leaders but experienced poor handling caused by accident damage to the front spoiler, resulting in him unintentionally blocking his father, giving Elliott the chance the pass for the victory. Elliott was unsure whether he would have won without Davey's accidental block, but Bobby defended his son, believing Elliott was just sitting back and would have passed regardless of Davey's presence.[82]

For race 2, Earnhardt dominated proceedings, leading 33 of the 50 laps to claim victory and the $22,000, ahead of Bodine and Darrell Waltrip in a Chevrolet.[84] Earnhardt had a strong start to the race, moving from seventh to first in less than two laps. On the final lap, Bodine tried a slingshot overtaking move but was thwarted this attempt by driving away from his opponent. Earnhardt believed changing all four tyres rather than just two in the pits gave him the upper hand. Meanwhile, Bodine and Harry Gant complained that Earnhardt's car was leaking oil, which blew onto their windscreens and obscured both drivers' visions. Bodine nevertheless accepted defeat, stating that he should not have backed off on the final attempt and that he should have stayed closer to Earnhardt before making the move.[82]

With the starters and race order decided, the 1986 Daytona 500 commenced on 17th February. It saw Bodine redeem his Twin 125s loss with a victory at the main event, ahead of Labonte and Waltrip. Elliott could only manage 13th, two laps down from the leaders, while Earnhardt's engine expired three laps before the end.[85] Nevertheless, Earnhardt's 1986 Twin 125s win served as a prelude towards him and Richard Childress Racing winning ten consecutive Twin 125s from 1990 to 1999.[86][87]

1989 Busch Clash (FOUND)

The 1989 Busch Clash was a race that commenced prior to the 1989 NASCAR Winston Cup Series. Occurring on 12th February at the Daytona International Speedway, the race would ultimately be won by Ken Schrader in a Chevrolet, after having led three-quarters of the event.

It was the 11th running of a unique 50-mile race at Daytona International Speedway that commenced before the 1989 season opener, the 1989 Daytona 500.[88][89] The event consists exclusively of drivers that won pole positions throughout the 1988 season, with 13 achieving that accolade.[90][88] Among those included Chevrolet drivers Ken Schrader, Geoffrey Bodine, Darrell Waltrip, and Rick Mast; Ford racers Davey Allison, Terry Labonte, Mark Martin, Alan Kulwicki, and Bill Elliott; Pontiac competitors Rusty Wallace and Morgan Shepherd; and single Oldsmobile and Buick entries in Rick Wilson and Ricky Rudd respectively.[88] In modern times, the event is now known as the Busch Light Clash at The Coliseum, as the 2022 event is to occur at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum.[91]

The Race

Prior to the race, the pole position was drawn via lots.[88] Schrader was drawn the first position, with Rudd lining up second, and Darrell Waltrip starting third.[88] With the starting order decided, the event commenced on 12th February.[88] Schrader maintained his lead at the start, holding on until Waltrip moved into the first position on lap 5.[88] Schrader was able to move back into first on lap 10 however, with Waltrip falling down the field for the remaining duration of the race, ultimately finishing 8th.[88] Schrader's main competition proved to be Allison, with the two being separated by just three car lengths.[88] Ultimately, Schrader narrowly edged out Allison to claim victory,[88] in what would be his first of two Busch Clash victories, the other occurring the following year.[92] Labonte would beat Bodine for third in a race that saw no retirements.[88]

1992 Atlanta 300

The 1992 Atlanta 300 (also known as the 1992 Atlanta Motor Speedway 300) was the fourth race of the 1992 NASCAR Busch Grand National Series. Occurring on 14th March at the Atlanta Motor Speedway, the race marked NASCAR history as Jeff Gordon won his first ever NASCAR event, using a Ford to edge out Buick's Harry Gant.

It was the inaugural running of this event, with the race typically lasting just under 300 miles.[93] The only 1992 NASCAR Busch Grand National Series race to occur at Atlanta Motor Speedway,[94] the race has ties to the modern Nalley Cars 250, having dropped the Atlanta title from 1993, and being reduced to 250 miles from 2015 onwards.[95][96]

Prior to the race, qualifying commenced with Jeff Gordon winning the pole position with a speed of 173.821 mph.[93] Directly behind him was Oldsmobile's Tracy Leslie, with Mark Martin lining up third out of 43 competitors in a Ford.[93] This race was also one of the few Busch Grand National Series events that Rick Hendrick of Hendrick Motorsports was in attendance for, albeit for a sponsor meeting.[97][98] At the time, Hendrick Motorsports had garnered a reputation for attracting future Hall of Famers like Geoff Bodine and Darrell Waltrip, but although it had achieved 32 victories from 1984 to 1992, had been unable to challenge for a Winston Cup Series title.[97] Meanwhile, it was reported that then-Atlanta Falcons coach Jerry Glanville had attempted to enter the race, but his entry was rejected by NASCAR officials.[99] According to NASCAR's Vice President of Competition Les Richter, lack of experience was the reason, stating "The reason Jerry Glanville can't race at Atlanta is that he hasn't driven in a race. Until he races at a small-sized track where he can see his ability and how he handles himself, we can't allow him to drive at Atlanta."[99]

The Race

With the starting order decided, the 1992 Atlanta 300 commenced on 14th March.[93] Gordon maintained his lead from the start, dominating the first 67 laps before dropping it to Martin.[93] On lap 4, a 12-car crash instigated by Oldsmobile's Tom Peck resulted in Chevrolet's Ernie Irvan being involved, with the resulting crashes causing him to suffer a cracked collarbone and a bruised jaw.[100] Meanwhile, Martin quickly lost the lead to Harry Gant, who in turn would drop it to Chevrolet's Dale Earnhardt on lap 75.[93] Martin quickly regained the lead on lap 80 though, defending it for 24 consecutive laps before ultimately losing it back to Gant.[93] For the middle part of the race, it was a generally open competition for the lead, with Earnhardt also remaining in contention until a head gasket failure after 118 laps eliminated him from the running.[93]

By lap 140, Dale Jarrett was in the first position in a Chevrolet, defending it for 22 laps.[93] Near the end of Jarrett's time as the leader, Hendrick stopped to watch what was occurring on the track.[98][97] He witnesses the vehicle driven by Gordon charging by, with him stating "I get on the other side of the track, right at the fence and this car comes by and goes into the corner and smoke is rolling off the tires. I stopped and said, 'this guy is going to crash, watch this'".[98][97] But instead of crashing, Gordon maintained his composure despite generally racing "slideways" and achieved the final lead change on lap 162.[98][100][97][93] From there, Gordon primarily defended the lead against Gant and four others, eventually crossing the line by a margin of 3.57 seconds to claim victory and $30,170 in prize money.[100][98][93][97] Gant finished second, while Chevrolet's Hut Stricklin took third after narrowly losing a side-by-side battle with Gant.[100][93] Post-race, Gordon expressed how emotional he was to win, stating "On that last lap, man, I lost it. "I just choked up really bad the whole lap. This is the biggest dream come true for me ever and I'm thrilled to death."[100]

This would prove to be Gordon's first win in a NASCAR-sanctioned event, as well as what contributed greatly towards his future success in the Cup Series.[100][97][98] After witnessing Gordon's victory, Hendrick was convinced that the 20-year-old was suitable for his team, signing him in the Summer that same year.[97][98] Gordon would later compete in the final races of the 1992 Winston Cup Series.[97] From there, Gordon would achieve a grand total of 93 wins and four Cup Series titles, all with Hendrick Motorsports.[97] The team itself thrived even following Gordon's departure.[97] Between 1993 to 2015, it had won 208 wins and 12 Cup Series championships.[97]

1996 DeVilbiss SuperFinish 200

The 1996 DeVilbiss SuperFinish 200 was the ninth race of the 1996 NASCAR Craftsman Truck Series. Occurring on June 30th at Nazareth Speedway, the race would be won by eventual 1996 runners-up Jack Sprague. This race was also notable for being the only Craftsman Truck Series start for 1989 NASCAR Winston Cup champion Rusty Wallace, and for being the only 1996 Craftsman Truck Series to not be televised live because of rain delays.

With the NASCAR Craftsman Truck Series having achieved great success in its inaugural season, with an average of 1.7 million for all 24 1995 races broadcast live on television, the 1996 DeVilbiss SuperFinish 200 marked the first time the series was raced at Nazareth Speedway. The race's hype influenced several Winston Cup drivers to compete. Among them was the 1989 Winston Cup champion Rusty Wallace, who competed in a Ford F-150 under Miller Beer colors. According to Wallace, 20% of his motivation for competing in the race was to help promote it for the speedway's owner, Roger Penske, in an attempt to increase crowd attendance. Despite expressing interest in competing in the final race of the series, Carquest 420K on November 3rd at Las Vegas Motor Speedway, Wallace would never race for the series again, making the 1996 DeVilbiss SuperFinish 200 the only Craftsman Truck Series race he would compete in.[101]

The Race

Qualifying occurred on June 29th, with Jimmy Hensley winning the pole position, ahead of Wallace who qualified 7th, and Jeff Burton who was in 16th.[102][103] The race itself was to be broadcast on CBS the following day at around 1:40 p.m..[104] However, it was subsequently delayed for four hours because of heavy rain.[105] This had the effects of causing the race to be shortened from 200 to 152 laps, but also resulted in CBS not showing the race by the time the showers ceased.[106] Jack Sprague would go on to win the race, passing fellow title challenger Ron Hornaday Jr on lap 112, and beating Hensley for first. Wallace ended up finishing ninth. Sprague won $39,575 of the $286,925 prize money for the race, and ended up joint-first in the standings with Hornaday Jr on 1,439 points.[107]

2000 Albertson's 300

The 2000 Albertson's 300 (also known as the 2000 Texas 300) was the seventh race of the 2000 NASCAR Busch Series Season. Occurring on 1st April at the Texas Motor Speedway, the event would ultimately be won by Mark Martin in a Roush-owned Ford, edging out Rousch teammate and Chevrolet driver Matt Kenseth. The race is infamous for a extensive delay caused by heavy rain after 18 laps, resulting in CBS prematurely ending its live coverage, with MTV Networks opting not to show the race finish.

It was the fourth running of the event, with the annual race typically lasting for 300 miles. The only 2000 NASCAR Busch Grand National Series race to occur at Texas Motor Speedway,[108][109] the race has ties to the modern SRS Distribution 250, the Xfinity race having been reduced to 250 miles for the 2022 edition.[110][109]

Prior to the race, qualifying commenced with Pontiac's Jason Leffler winning the pole position with a speed of 184.451 mph. Mark Martin was directly behind him in second, with Chevrolet driver Jay Sauter lining up third.[111] Martin's teammate Matt Kenseth qualified only 26 out of 43 competitors, with several others having failed to make the starting order.[111] Martin could certainly be considered the favourite; aside from winning three of the first four Busch races he entered in 2000, he also enjoyed a highly successful junior record at Texas, having won the last previous Busch races at the track, and three overall.[112] He had also won the 2000 Aaron's 312 at the Atlanta Motor Speedway on 11th March, which was delayed by six hours because of heavy rain.[113][112] It would soon become apparent that the 2000 Albertson's 300 would suffer a similar ordeal.[112]

The Race

With the starting order decided, the 2000 Albertson's 300 commenced on 1st April.[111][112] Leffler maintained his lead at the start, but was passed by Sauter by lap 2.[111] However, he would soon be passed by Chevrolet's Kevin Harvick, who would proceed to lead until the rain came down on lap 18.[111][112] This forced a caution period, before the race was red-flagged as it became clear the heavy rain would make conditions undrivable at Texas.[112][111] It would not resume for four-and-a-half hours, meaning the finish would take place at night.[112]

When the race resumed on lap 39, Todd Bodine in a Chevrolet took the first position, only for Harvick to repass him on lap 56.[111] His time as leader lasted another 30 laps, before Chevrolet's David Green, who had started with a backup vehicle following a practice crash, took over.[111][112] Green was then passed by fellow Chevrolet driver Joe Nemechek, only for him to be passed by a duelling Martin and Kenseth by lap 106.[111] By lap 125, Kenseth led under caution as a consequence of a major accident occurring on the backstretch on lap 124, collecting eight cars.[111] After completing 150 laps, Nemechek crashed out, bringing out another caution.[112][111] Once it resumed by lap 160, Kenseth led Martin.[112][111] However, Martin capitalised on Kenseth drifting high prior to the backstretch, securing what would become the final lead change.[112][111]

Following one more caution between laps 182 to 187, Martin ultimately edged out his protégé by four car lengths to claim victory and $68,200 in prize money.[112][111] Green followed Martin and Kenseth to finish third.[112][111] Post-race, Martin expressed that "It was a tough race to win. We had to be smart, had a good setup on the car and got better as we went on."[112] He nevertheless found it surprising that he overtook a "strong" Kenseth, the latter admitting he was unable to win the duel despite having a seemingly perfect car.[112]

2006 Ameriquest 300

The 2006 Ameriquest 300 was the 27th race of the 2006 NASCAR Busch Series. Occurring on 2nd September at the California Speedway, the event was ultimately won by Kasey Kahne in a Dodge, after having gained the lead with three laps remaining.

The 13th Busch Series race to be held at the California Speedway, it was one of two 2006 Busch events to commence at Fontana.[114] The other was the 2006 Stater Brothers 300, which was held on 25th February was won by Ford's Greg Biffle.[115] It has ties to the modern Production Alliance Group 300, with the two Fontana races being merged into one from 2011 onwards.[114]

Prior to the race, qualifying commenced with Clint Bowyer winning the pole position in a Chevrolet, with a speed of 179.399 mph.[116][117] Directly behind him were the Chevrolets of Kyle Busch and Kevin Harvick, in second and third respectively.[116][117] Kasey Kahne qualified fourth out of 43 drivers.[116][117]

The Race

With the starting order decided, the 2006 Ameriquest 300 commenced on 2nd September.[116][117] Bowyer maintained his lead early on, before being passed by Busch, who proceed to lead from laps 10 to 18.[116][117] Harvick then took over for the next 20 laps, only for a fast-charging Mark Martin to primarily control the race in a Ford.[116][117] With the exception of a brief Kahne run as leader from laps 76 to 78, Martin would hold the first position for 88 laps.[116][117] Suddenly, he was forced to make a late fuel stop, considerably dropping him down the order. [116][117]

After Kahne overtook Chevrolet's Tony Stewart by lap 133, he began a late-duel with another Chevrolet driver, Paul Menard.[118][116][117] Both switched the lead a few times, with Kahne making what ultimately turned out to be the final lead change on lap 148.[118][116][117] Menard did not give up, and looked to be challenging Kahne for first on the final lap.[118][116][117] But as he reached the backstretch, his car ran out of fuel, coasting towards the finish.[118][116][117] Kahne therefore claimed victory and $90,825 in prize money.[116][117][118] Harvick and a recovering Martin overtook Menard to finish second and third respectively.[116][117]

Availability

According to NASCAR on TV, 45 minutes of footage was televised live by ABC as part of its Wide World of Sports, alongside coverage of the World Cup Bodybuilding.[119] The broadcast did not publicly resurface until it was uploaded to NASCAR Classics on 16th August 2023 as part of the service's launch.[120] Home video footage from the stands can also be viewed online.

ESPN reportedly televised highlights of the 1981 CRC Chemicals 500.[121] However, no broadcast has resurfaced, with NASCAR on TV also stating that official confirmation that a broadcast occurred has not yet been achieved.[121] Nevertheless, it does note the existence of a news feature that credited ESPN for providing footage, indicating the possibility an ESPN airing did occur.[121] According to Racing-Reference, said news clip was uploaded to YouTube by MotorsportsHistoryTV, with Wayback Machine analysis revealing the video was uploaded on 22nd March 2015.[122][123] However, the video has since been taken down, with Wayback Machine having not archived it.[123] Thus, no race footage is currently publicly available.

As noted in nascarman History's Top 10 LOST NASCAR TV Broadcasts, 2-and-a-half hours of highlights for the 1982 Goody's Sportsman 300 were televised by the USA Network on 27th March 1982, under the title of "Auto Racing: Sportsman 300". Interestingly, this was not the first Budweiser Late Model Sportsman Series to be televised, as NASCAR on TV claims that the subsequent 1982 Eastern 150 was broadcast on ESPN on 3rd March 1982, which lasted for two hours.[124] The USA Network broadcast has yet to resurface, but a clip of the last lap was included as part of a January 1983 interview with Jack Ingram, which was uploaded to YouTube on 13th December 2020 by Calhoun98. Additionally, some footage was included during FS1's broadcast of the 2023 Beef. It's What's for Dinner. 300. Photos and newspaper clippings of the race are also publicly viewable.[18] Ultimately, no footage of the 1982 Eastern 150 is currently publicly available.

According to NASCAR on TV, the 1982 Twin 125s were televised on 13th February. However, they aired on USA Network rather than on CBS, because CBS had scheduling conflicts regarding other sports.[125] Race 2 has since publicly resurfaced and can be accessed widely on YouTube. However, no footage of race 1 has emerged nascarman History, a historian on NASCAR and its lost broadcasts, conducted research on whether race 1 was indeed televised, and found no supporting evidence.[106] He does, however, speculate that the race might have been shown, and therefore could have been recorded by a fan.[106] As of the present day, footage of race 1 remains unconfirmed.

The 1982 CRC Chemicals is listed as one of two 1982 Winston Cup Series events to have been televised but not be publicly available, alongside the 1982 Winston Western 500.[126] Currently, no footage of the race is viewable, although a few photos have resurfaced.

The 1982 Winston Western 500 is listed as one of two 1982 Winston Cup Series events to have been televised but not be publicly available, alongside the 1982 CRC Chemicals 500.[126] According to NASCAR on TV, the race was reportedly broadcast on WTBS, which it states would be the first race to be broadcast on the network.[127] However, it also claims that no evidence the broadcast exists.[127] Thus, no footage is currently available, although the chances of the footage existing rises due to how the race is a title decider.[34] Photos of the event are also publicly available.[128]

According to nascarman History's Top 10 LOST NASCAR TV Broadcasts, the 1983 and 1984 Goody's Sportsman 300 races also received coverage from the USA Network. However, these broadcasts have yet to resurface, although footage of Howard's accident at the 1983 is publicly viewable. Photos and newspaper clippings of the events can also be accessed.[43][45][60]

Meanwhile, one hour of highlights from the 1983 Mason-Dixon 500 were reportedly televised by Mizlou on 21st May 1983.[129] However, this broadcast has yet to resurface; nevertheless, NASCAR Classics did upload a 90-second summary of the event but it does make the Mizlou coverage's survival status questionable.

Meanwhile, NASCAR on TV, claims that that the 1983 Southern 500 was televised by ABC, a tradition as it had broadcast the race since 1962.[130] However, the website claims that there is no proof that the race was shown.[130] Nevertheless, it does note that a big race is likely to be televised by this point,[130] but no footage of the race is currently publicly available. However, some publicly viewable photos, including Allison being interviewed by MRN's Ned Jarrett and another interviewer,[131] provides further evidence of a television broadcast.

According to Ultimate Racing History, the 1984 Warner W. Hodgdon Carolina 500 was broadcast on tape delay and syndicated by Special Events Television Network (SETN) for several networks, with Mike Joy as lead announcer and Benny Parsons providing colour commentary.[67] NASCAR on TV claims this would make it the first NASCAR race to have aired on the network, but disputes that an airing was ever confirmed.[132] As of the present day, no footage of the 1984 Warner W. Hodgdon Carolina 500 is currently available, not even as part of the recap for the subsequent race, the 1984 Coca-Cola 500. A few photos nevertheless are publicly accessible.[71]

While broadcasts of later Delaware 500 races can be found on YouTube, footage of the 1984 edition is scarce. According to NASCAR on TV, there were claims that the race was televised as a 1-hour tape delay on Mizlou, but currently there is no evidence that this broadcast exists.[133] Thus, whether the race was ever televised remains unconfirmed. However, the race was recorded, as footage of Allison's crash can be found as part of a recap prior to the 1984 Goody's 500.

The 1985 and 1986 Twin 125s were allegedly televised on tape delay by CBS.[134][135][106] Ultimately, whereas footage of many Twin 125s from the 1980s have since publicly resurfaced, the 1985 heats are completely inaccessible as of the present day. However, there is no information on when the 1985 and 1986 heats were aired, and with NASCAR on TV also placing the races under its "Unconfirmed broadcasts" section,[134][135] full confirmation that CBS broadcasts occurred has not yet been achieved.

Prior to November 2022, the 1989 edition was the only missing Busch Clash, with the other races having been uploaded to YouTube. It was twice previously uploaded in full to YouTube according to Racing-Reference.[136] However, both uploads were then taken down. However, following a video by NBR on 13th November 2022 titled "10 Pieces of NASCAR Lost Media", which summarised the missing 1989 Busch Clash footage, nascarman History announced that he had a VHS copy of the race. He uploaded the CBS broadcast of the event the following day.

Despite the historical significance of the event, the 1992 Atlanta 300 went untelevised.[137][138] It was known to be recorded, with ABC holding the rights to the Spring Atlanta event in the Winston Cup Series.[138][137] However, the recording was made only to be a backup should the Cup Series race be cancelled and filler was required to meet broadcast demands.[138] As the Spring Atlanta race in question, the 1992 Motorcraft Quality Parts 500, occurred without any issues, the ABC broadcast of the 1992 Atlanta 300 did not air.[139][138][137] Responding to a query regarding whether the event could be uploaded to YouTube, SMIFF TV, a prominent collector of NASCAR broadcasts, stated that the recording is unlikely to resurface even within the underground race trading market.[137] Nevertheless, some highlights would be uploaded to YouTube by Dave W. Additionally, some footage was broadcast during FS1's coverage of the 2023 RAPTOR 250, indicating the full broadcast may one day resurface.

While CBS did not televise the race live as intended,[104][106] over a minute of footage of the 1996 DeVilbiss SuperFinish 200 was shown in the opening recap of the 1996 Sears Auto Center 200 the following week. According to Racing-Reference, TNN had broadcast the race a few days after it occurred, during the middle of the night.[106] However, unlike televised footage from other 1996 Craftsman Truck Series races that are now accessible on YouTube, none of the TNN footage of the race is currently publicly accessible.

CBS had also planned to fully televise the 2000 Albertson's 300 live, before it became clear that the long rain delay would force a premature exit.[140][141][142] The broadcast drew a 1.6 Nielsen rating.[141] Discussion indicates that MTV Networks was supposed to cover the race finish, but, in a controversial move, decided to steer clear.[142] Since then, speculation persists on whether the race even received any professional recordings following the short CBS broadcast.[142] As of the present day, only the CBS coverage can be found online. Nevertheless, it also known that the Performance Racing Network (PRN) was on-hand to provide live radio coverage of the event.[140]

The 2006 Ameriquest 300 received full coverage from TNN.[117] Prominent NASCAR broadcast collector Dave W uploaded a recording on 31st August 2016 to YouTube, but many noted that around 100 laps from the uploaded footage was missing. This led to some, including NBR in his video "10 Pieces of NASCAR Lost Media" to speculate on what may have happened to the lost coverage. But in the comments of the same video, Dave W revealed the recording was incomplete simply because he was attending qualifying for the U.S. Nationals, and so was unable to fully record the 2006 Ameriquest 300. As of the present day, no one has found a full copy of the TNN broadcast, making it partially lost.

Gallery

Videos

Footage of the last lap of the 1982 Goody's Sportsman 300.

Footage of the 1982 Goody's Sportsman 300 included during FS1's coverage of the 2023 Beef. It's What's for Dinner. 300.

Second race of 1982 Twin 125s.

Footage of Rodney Howard's crash at the 1983 Goody's Sportsman 300.

Broadcast of the 1984 Goody's 500 containing footage of Allison's crash at the 1984 Delaware 500 (3:12-3:25).

The CBS coverage of the 1989 Busch Clash.

Highlights of the 1992 Atlanta 300.

Highlights of the 1992 Atlanta 300 shown during the broadcast of the 2023 RAPTOR 250.

The only currently known footage of the 1996 DeVilbiss SuperFinish 200 (0:00-1:08).

CBS coverage of the 2000 Albertson's 300.

The incomplete recording of the 2006 Ameriquest 300.

"Top 10 NASCAR Lost Media TV Broadcasts" summarising the 1996 DevilBiss SuperFinish 500 (1:19-1:43) and the 1982-1984 Goody's Sportsman 300 broadcasts (3:53-4:28).

NBR detailing the 1996 DevilBiss SuperFinish 200 (0:26-2:15), 1983 Southern 500 (2:15-2:48), 2000 Albertson's 300 (2:49-318), 1992 Atlanta 300 (4:08-4:52), and 2006 Ameriquest 300 (4:54-5:44) race broadcasts.

NFJJ detailing the missing 1996 DevilBiss SuperFinish 200 broadcast.

See Also

External Links

References

  1. 1.00 1.01 1.02 1.03 1.04 1.05 1.06 1.07 1.08 1.09 1.10 1.11 1.12 1.13 1.14 1.15 Racing-Reference detailing qualifying and race results for the 1981 Coca-Cola 500. Retrieved 16 Apr '22
  2. 2.0 2.1 Racing-Reference detailing the 1981 NASCAR Winston Cup calendar. Retrieved 16 Apr '22
  3. Racing-Reference detailing the results of the 1981 Atlanta Journal 500. Retrieved 16 Apr '22
  4. NASCAR noting the race gaining the Coca-Cola title until 1985. Retrieved 16 Apr '22
  5. 5.0 5.1 The New York Times Stats detailing the history of the Atlanta races. Retrieved 16 Apr '22
  6. NASCAR linking the race with the Quaker State 400. Retrieved 16 Apr '22
  7. Beyond the Flag noting the race being removed from the 2011 schedule. Retrieved 16 Apr '22
  8. The New York Times reporting on new spoiler rules that were introduced prior to the 1981 Coca-Cola 500. Retrieved 16 Apr '22
  9. 9.00 9.01 9.02 9.03 9.04 9.05 9.06 9.07 9.08 9.09 9.10 9.11 9.12 9.13 Racing-Reference detailing qualifying and race results for the 1981 CRC Chemicals 500. Retrieved 16 Apr '22
  10. Racing-Reference detailing the results of the 1981 Mason-Dixon 500. Retrieved 16 Apr '22
  11. 11.0 11.1 The New York Times Stats detailing the history of Dover International Speedway's Cup Series races. Retrieved 16 Apr '22
  12. Draftkings Nation detailing the Twin 125s. Retrieved 29 Dec '21
  13. The New York Times detailing the the Twin 125s' purpose. Retrieved 29 Dec '21
  14. 14.0 14.1 14.2 Racing-Reference detailing the 1982 NASCAR Winston Cup calendar. Retrieved 16 Apr '22
  15. 15.0 15.1 Racing-Reference detailing the 1982 Daytona 500 starting order and results. Retrieved 29 Dec '21
  16. Racing-Reference detailing results for the first 1982 Twin 125s race. Retrieved 29 Dec '21
  17. Racing-Reference detailing results for the second 1982 Twin 125s race. Retrieved 29 Dec '21
  18. 18.0 18.1 18.2 18.3 18.4 18.5 18.6 RacersReunion detailing the 1982 Goody's Sportsman 300 and providing photos and newspaper clippings of it. Retrieved 19 Apr '22
  19. 19.0 19.1 19.2 The Biggest NASCAR Races detailing how the NASCAR Budweiser Late Model Sportsman Series was created. Retrieved 19 Apr '22
  20. Archived NASCAR announcing the series being renamed to the Xfinity Series. Retrieved 19 Apr '22
  21. 21.0 21.1 21.2 21.3 21.4 21.5 21.6 21.7 Racing-Reference detailing the qualifying and race results of the 1982 Goody's Sportsman 300. Retrieved 19 Apr '22
  22. The New York Times Stats detailing the history of Sportsman races at Daytona International Speedway. Retrieved 19 Apr '22
  23. 23.0 23.1 Dale Earnhardt: Rear View Mirror containing a quote from Earnhardt about his concerns prior to the 1982 Goody's Sportsman 300. Retrieved 19 Apr '22
  24. 24.0 24.1 24.2 24.3 24.4 24.5 24.6 Associated Press reporting on Earnhardt winning the 1982 Goody's Sportsman 300 (report found on RacersReunion. Retrieved 19 Apr '22
  25. 25.0 25.1 25.2 25.3 25.4 25.5 25.6 25.7 Racing-Reference detailing the qualifying and race results of the event. Retrieved 19 Apr '22
  26. Racing-Reference detailing the calendar for the 1982 NASCAR Budweiser Late Model Sportsman Series. Retrieved 19 Apr '22
  27. Racing-Reference detailing the results of the 1982 Spring 220. Retrieved 19 Apr '22
  28. Racing-Reference detailing the results of the 1982 Harvest 150. Retrieved 19 Apr '22
  29. The New York Times Stats listing the history of Richmond Fairgrounds Raceway Xfinity races. Retrieved 19 Apr '22
  30. 30.00 30.01 30.02 30.03 30.04 30.05 30.06 30.07 30.08 30.09 30.10 30.11 30.12 30.13 30.14 30.15 Racing-Reference detailing qualifying and race results for the 1982 CRC Chemicals 500. Retrieved 16 Apr '22
  31. Racing-Reference detailing the results of the 1982 Mason-Dixon 500. Retrieved 16 Apr '22
  32. 32.0 32.1 Racing-Reference detailing qualifying results for the 1982 CRC Chemicals 500. Retrieved 16 Apr '22
  33. 33.0 33.1 The New York Times reporting on Waltrip winning the 1982 CRC Chemicals 500 by half a length. Retrieved 16 Apr '22
  34. 34.00 34.01 34.02 34.03 34.04 34.05 34.06 34.07 34.08 34.09 34.10 34.11 34.12 Racing-Reference detailing qualifying and race results for the 1982 Winston Western 500. Retrieved 17 Apr '22
  35. Spartanburg Herald Journal reporting on Riverside's usage of the metric system (article found on RacersReunion). Retrieved 17 Apr '22
  36. 36.0 36.1 Racing-Reference detailing the results of the 1982 Budweiser 400. Retrieved 17 Apr '22
  37. DriverAverages listing the races at Riverside International Raceway. Retrieved 17 Apr '22
  38. Racing Circuits detailing the history and the end of the Riverside International Raceway. Retrieved 17 Apr '22
  39. Racing-Reference detailing the points standings heading into the 1982 Winston Western 500 following the culmination of the 1982 Atlanta Journal 500. Retrieved 17 Apr '22
  40. Motorsports Hall of Fame noting Waltrip's three Winston Cup Series title wins. Retrieved 17 Apr '22
  41. 41.00 41.01 41.02 41.03 41.04 41.05 41.06 41.07 41.08 41.09 41.10 41.11 Racing-Reference detailing the qualifying and race results of the 1983 Goody's Sportsman 300. Retrieved 20 Apr '22
  42. Racing-Reference detailing the 1983 NASCAR Budweiser Late Model Sportsman Series calendar. Retrieved 20 Apr '22
  43. 43.0 43.1 43.2 43.3 43.4 43.5 43.6 RacersReunion detailing the 1983 Goody's Sportsman 300 and providing newspaper clippings of it. Retrieved 20 Apr '22
  44. 44.0 44.1 44.2 44.3 44.4 44.5 44.6 44.7 44.8 44.9 Spartanburg Herald reporting on Waltrip winning the 1983 Goody's Sportsman 300 and Howard's crash (report found on RacersReunion). Retrieved 20 Apr '22
  45. 45.0 45.1 The Crash Photos Database summarising and providing photos of Howard's accident at the 1983 Goody's Sportsman 300. Retrieved 20 Apr '22
  46. 46.00 46.01 46.02 46.03 46.04 46.05 46.06 46.07 46.08 46.09 46.10 46.11 46.12 46.13 46.14 46.15 46.16 46.17 Racing-Reference detailing qualifying and race results for the 1983 Mason-Dixon 500. Retrieved 17 Apr '22
  47. 47.0 47.1 Racing-Reference detailing the 1983 NASCAR Winston Cup calendar. Retrieved 17 Apr '22
  48. Racing-Reference detailing the results of the 1983 Budweiser 500. Retrieved 17 Apr '22
  49. The New York Times Stats detailing the history of the Dover Downs International Speedway/Dover International Speedway races. Retrieved 17 Apr '22
  50. 50.0 50.1 The New York Times reporting on Ruttman winning the pole position for the 1983 Mason-Dixon 500. Retrieved 17 Apr '22
  51. 51.0 51.1 Dover Speedway summarising the 1983 Mason-Dixon 500 and noting Allison tied the record of Dover victories at the event. Retrieved 17 Apr '22
  52. 52.0 52.1 52.2 52.3 52.4 52.5 The New York Times reporting on Allison winning the 1983 Mason-Dixon 500 and the lightning that killed two spectators. Retrieved 17 Apr '22
  53. 53.00 53.01 53.02 53.03 53.04 53.05 53.06 53.07 53.08 53.09 53.10 53.11 53.12 53.13 53.14 Racing-Reference detailing qualifying and race results for the 1983 Southern 500. Retrieved 17 Apr '22
  54. 54.0 54.1 Racing-Reference detailing the results of the 1983 TranSouth 500. Retrieved 17 Apr '22
  55. 55.0 55.1 Fantasy Racing Cheat Sheet detailing the history of Darlington Raceway and how both races were merged into one from 2005. Retrieved 17 Apr '22
  56. Darlington Raceway detailing the Cook Out Southern 500. Retrieved 17 Apr '22
  57. 57.0 57.1 57.2 57.3 The New York Times reporting on Allison winning the 1983 Southern 500. Retrieved 17 Apr '22
  58. 58.00 58.01 58.02 58.03 58.04 58.05 58.06 58.07 58.08 58.09 58.10 58.11 58.12 Racing-Reference detailing the qualifying and race results of the 1984 Goody's Sportsman 300. Retrieved 20 Apr '22
  59. Racing-Reference detailing the 1984 NASCAR Busch Grand National Series calendar. Retrieved 20 Apr '22
  60. 60.0 60.1 60.2 The Crash Photos Database detailing the multicar crash at the 1984 Goody's Sportsman 300. Retrieved 20 Apr '22
  61. 61.0 61.1 Fantasy Racing Cheat Sheet detailing the 1984 NASCAR Winston Cup Series schedule. Retrieved 30 Dec '21
  62. Fantasy Racing Cheat Sheet detailing the 1984 Warner W. Hodgdon American 500 results. Retrieved 30 Dec '21
  63. Racing-Reference listing all North Carolina Speedway NASCAR events. Retrieved 30 Dec '21
  64. Racing-Reference detailing how the Ferko lawsuit resulted in the Rockingham Speedway being removed from the NASCAR calendar. Retrieved 30 Dec '21
  65. 65.0 65.1 The New York Times reporting on Allison winning the 1984 Warner W. Hodgdon Carolina 500. Retrieved 30 Dec '21
  66. 66.0 66.1 66.2 66.3 UPI previewing the 1984 Warner W. Hodgdon Carolina 500 prior to the qualification stage. Retrieved 30 Dec '21
  67. 67.0 67.1 67.2 Ultimate Racing History detailing the start order and results of the 1984 Warner W. Hodgdon 500, and listing the supposed Special Events Television Network (SETN) broadcast announcers. Retrieved 30 Dec '21
  68. 68.0 68.1 Fantasy Racing Cheat Sheet detailing the start order and race results of the 1984 Warner W. Hodgdon Carolina 500. Retrieved 30 Dec '21
  69. 69.0 69.1 Racing-Reference detailing the start order and race results for the 1984 Warner W. Hodgdon Carolina 500. Retrieved 30 Dec '21
  70. UPI reporting on the injuries Yarborough suffered at the 1983 Warner W. Hodgdon American 500, which partly influenced his decision to withdraw from the 1984 Warner W. Hodgdon Carolina 500. Retrieved 30 Dec '21
  71. 71.0 71.1 Rockingham Speedway detailing some notable highlights of the 1984 Warner W. Hodgdon 500, and providing photos. Retrieved 30 Dec '21
  72. Fantasy Racing Cheat Sheet detailing results of the 1984 Budweiser 500. Retrieved 30 Dec '21
  73. Dover Motor Speedway detailing its history in the NASCAR Cup Series. Retrieved 30 Dec '21
  74. 74.0 74.1 74.2 74.3 74.4 Ultimate Racing History providing results and prize money for the 1984 Delaware 500, noting qualifying was rained out. Retrieved 30 Dec '21
  75. 75.0 75.1 75.2 75.3 Fantasy Racing Cheat Sheet detailing results of the race, and points won. Retrieved 30 Dec '21
  76. Fantasy Racing Cheat Sheet detailing results of the 1984 Goody's 500, which Allison competed in following the 1984 Delaware 500. Retrieved 30 Dec '21
  77. The final 1984 Winston Cup Series standings. Retrieved 30 Dec '21
  78. 78.0 78.1 78.2 78.3 78.4 78.5 The Los Angeles Times reporting on both 1985 Twin 125s races. Retrieved 29 Dec '21
  79. 79.0 79.1 Racing-Reference detailing the start order and results for the 1985 Daytona 500. Retrieved 29 Dec '21
  80. Racing-Reference detailing results of the first 1985 Twin 125s race. Retrieved 29 Dec '21
  81. 81.0 81.1 Racing-Reference detailing results of the second 1985 Twin 125s race. Retrieved 29 Dec '21
  82. 82.0 82.1 82.2 The Los Angeles Times reporting on the two 1986 Twin 125s races. Retrieved 29 Dec '21
  83. Racing-Reference detailing results of the first 1986 Twin 125s race. Retrieved 29 Dec '21
  84. Racing-Reference detailing results of the second 1986 Twin 125s race. Retrieved 29 Dec '21
  85. Racing-Reference detailing the 1986 Daytona 500 starting order and results. Retrieved 29 Dec '21
  86. RCR detailing the team and Earnhardt winning ten consecutive Twin 125s. Retrieved 29 Dec '21
  87. Chicago Tribune reporting on Earnhardt winning his tenth consecutive Twin 125s in 1999. Retrieved 29 Dec '21
  88. 88.00 88.01 88.02 88.03 88.04 88.05 88.06 88.07 88.08 88.09 88.10 Racing-Reference detailing qualifying and race results for the 1989 Busch Clash. Retrieved 17 Apr '22
  89. Racing-Reference detailing the 1989 NASCAR Winston Cup Series schedule. Retrieved 17 Apr '22
  90. Frontstretch explaining the Busch Clash. Retrieved 17 Apr '22
  91. NASCAR detailing the Busch Light Clash at The Coliseum. Retrieved 17 Apr '22
  92. Twitter post noting Schrader won two Busch Clashes back-to-back. Retrieved 17 Apr '22
  93. 93.00 93.01 93.02 93.03 93.04 93.05 93.06 93.07 93.08 93.09 93.10 93.11 Racing-Reference detailing the qualifying and race results of the 1992 Atlanta 300. Retrieved 24 Apr '22
  94. Racing-Reference detailing the 1992 NASCAR Busch Grand National Series schedule. Retrieved 24 Apr '22
  95. The New York Times Stats detailing Busch Grand National Series/Xfinity races held at Atlanta Motor Speedway. Retrieved 24 Apr '22
  96. Jayski reporting on the Atlanta 300 being renamed to the Nalley Cars 250. Retrieved 24 Apr '22
  97. 97.00 97.01 97.02 97.03 97.04 97.05 97.06 97.07 97.08 97.09 97.10 97.11 ESPN detailing how the 1992 Atlanta 300 led to Gordon signing with Hendrick Motorsports, and his and the team's later success in the Cup Series. Retrieved 24 Apr '22
  98. 98.0 98.1 98.2 98.3 98.4 98.5 98.6 Archived NASCAR detailing the moment Hendrick was convinced he should sign Gordon for his team. Retrieved 24 Apr '22
  99. 99.0 99.1 The New York Times reporting on Jerry Glanville being denied entry for the 1992 Atlanta 300. Retrieved 24 Apr '22
  100. 100.0 100.1 100.2 100.3 100.4 100.5 News & Record reporting on Gordon winning the 1992 Atlanta 300 and Irvan's injuries following his crash. Retrieved 24 Apr '22
  101. Morning Call article reporting on the 1996 DeVilbiss SuperFinish 200 being the first Craftsman Truck Series race to occur on Nazareth Speedway, and Rusty Wallace's preparation for it. Retrieved 10 Jul '21
  102. Deseret News summarising Jimmy Hensley winning the pole position for the 1996 DeVilbiss SuperFinish 200. Retrieved 10 Jul '21
  103. Jeff Burton book discussing Wallace and Burton qualifying for and racing in the 1996 DeVilbiss SuperFinish 200. Retrieved 10 Jul '21
  104. 104.0 104.1 Morning Call article detailing the television schedule for the qualifying and race of the 1996 DeVilbiss SuperFinish 200. Retrieved 10 Jul '21
  105. 1st July 1996 edition of Santa Ann Orange County Register reporting on the 1996 DeVilbiss SuperFinish 200 being delayed for four hours because of showers. Retrieved 10 Jul '21
  106. 106.0 106.1 106.2 106.3 106.4 106.5 Racing-Reference detailing various lost and rumoured broadcasts, including of the missing Twin 125s events. Retrieved 29 Dec '21
  107. Greensboro News and Record reporting on Sprague winning the shortened 1996 DeVilbiss SuperFinish 200. Retrieved 10 Jul '21
  108. Racing-Reference detailing the 2000 NASCAR Busch Grand National Series schedule. Retrieved 26 May '23
  109. 109.0 109.1 Racing-Reference listing Xfinity races held at the Texas Motor Speedway.
  110. Jayski's Silly Season Site previewing the 2022 SRS Distribution 250. Retrieved 26 May '23
  111. 111.00 111.01 111.02 111.03 111.04 111.05 111.06 111.07 111.08 111.09 111.10 111.11 111.12 111.13 111.14 Racing-Reference detailing the qualifying and race results of the 2000 Albertson's 300. Retrieved 26 May '23
  112. 112.00 112.01 112.02 112.03 112.04 112.05 112.06 112.07 112.08 112.09 112.10 112.11 112.12 112.13 112.14 Deseret News reporting on Martin winning the 2000 Albertson's 300. Retrieved 26 May '23
  113. Racing-Reference detailing the qualifying and race results of the 2000 Aaron's 312. Retrieved 26 May '23
  114. 114.0 114.1 Racing-Reference listing Xfinity races to have commenced at the California Speedway. Retrieved 26 May '23
  115. Racing-Reference detailing the results of the 2006 Stater Brothers 300. Retrieved 26 May '23
  116. 116.00 116.01 116.02 116.03 116.04 116.05 116.06 116.07 116.08 116.09 116.10 116.11 116.12 116.13 Racing-Reference detailing the qualifying and race results of the 2006 Ameriquest 300. Retrieved 26 May '23
  117. 117.00 117.01 117.02 117.03 117.04 117.05 117.06 117.07 117.08 117.09 117.10 117.11 117.12 117.13 117.14 Jayski's Silly Season Site detailing the results of the 2006 Ameriquest 300 and other statistics. Retrieved 26 May '23
  118. 118.0 118.1 118.2 118.3 118.4 Orlando Sentinel reporting on Kahne winning the 2006 Ameriquest 300. Retrieved 26 May '23
  119. NASCAR on TV detailing the ABC broadcast of the 1981 Coca-Cola 500. Retrieved 16 Apr '22
  120. NASCAR announcing NASCAR Classics. Retrieved 16th Aug '23
  121. 121.0 121.1 121.2 NASCAR on TV detailing the possibility of an ESPN broadcast of the race. Retrieved 16 Apr '22
  122. Racing-Reference noting the existence of 1981 CRC Chemicals 500 race footage thanks to a MotorsportsHistoryTV upload. Retrieved 16 Apr '22
  123. 123.0 123.1 Wayback Machine providing information of the now-deleted news video from MotorsportsHistoryTV. Retrieved 16 Apr '22
  124. NASCAR on TV detailing the ESPN broadcast of the 1982 Eastern 150, which notably came before the USA Network airing of the Goody's Sportsman 300. Retrieved 19 Apr '22
  125. NASCAR on TV detailing the 1982 Twin 125s USA Network broadcast. Retrieved 29 Dec '21
  126. 126.0 126.1 1982 NASCAR Winston Cup Series playlist claiming the race is one of two to be televised but not be publicly available. Retrieved 16 Apr '22
  127. 127.0 127.1 NASCAR on TV detailing a possible WTBS broadcast of the 1982 Winston Western 500. Retrieved 17 Apr '22
  128. ScottBaker providing photos of the 1982 Winston Western 500. Retrieved 17 Apr '22
  129. NASCAR on TV detailing the Mizlou broadcast of the 1983 Mason-Dixon 500. Retrieved 17 Apr '22
  130. 130.0 130.1 130.2 NASCAR on TV detailing the possibility of an ABC broadcast of the 1983 Southern 500. Retrieved 17 Apr '22
  131. Twitter post providing a photo of Allison being interviewed post-1983 Southern 500. Retrieved 17 Apr '22
  132. NASCAR on TV detailing the possibility of an Special Events Television Network (SETN) broadcast of the 1984 Warner W. Hodgdon Carolina 500. Retrieved 30 Dec '21
  133. NASCAR on TV detailing the possibility of the 1984 Delaware 500 being broadcast on Mizlou. Retrieved 30 Dec '21
  134. 134.0 134.1 NASCAR on TV detailing a possible CBS broadcast of the 1985 Twin 125s. Retrieved 29 Dec '21
  135. 135.0 135.1 NASCAR on TV detailing a possible CBS broadcast of the 1986 Twin 125s. Retrieved 29 Dec '21
  136. Racing-Reference noting two previous uploads of the 1989 Busch Clash to YouTube that have since been taken down. Retrieved 17 Apr '22
  137. 137.0 137.1 137.2 137.3 SMIFF TV responding to a query regarding a recording of the 1992 Atlanta 300. Retrieved 24 Apr '22
  138. 138.0 138.1 138.2 138.3 r/NASCAR discussing the 1992 Atlanta 300 ABC recording. Retrieved 24 Apr '22
  139. Racing-Reference detailing the results of the 1992 Motorcraft Quality Parts 500. Retrieved 24 Apr '22
  140. 140.0 140.1 Motorsport noting CBS and PRN were to provide coverage of the 2000 Albertson's 300. Retrieved 26 May '23
  141. 141.0 141.1 Sports Business Journal noting CBS' brief coverage of the 2000 Albertson's 300 drew a 1.6 Nielson rating. Retrieved 26 May '23
  142. 142.0 142.1 142.2 r/NASCAR discussing lost NASCAR media, including the 2000 Albertson's 300. Retrieved 26 May '23