Catch-As-Catch-Can Wrestling (lost early BBC televised professional wrestling matches; 1938-1939; 1946-1947)

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Earlmccready.jpg

Earl McCready, who wrestled in the first televised professional wrestling match.

Status: Lost


Catch-As-Catch-Can Wrestling, known simply as Wrestling from 1946-1947, are a collection of professional wrestling matches broadcast on BBC television from 1938-1939, and from 1946-1947. A match featuring Earl McCready against Percy Foster is considered to be the first televised professional wrestling match.

Background

Getting its name from the combat sport style popular within British wrestling,[1] Catch-As-Catch-Can Wrestling debuted on 12th March 1938, featuring a match between Canadian and then-NWA British Empire/Commonwealth champion Earl McCready against South African wrestler Percy Foster.[2][3] McCready would later appear in the next two televised matches, firstly against English opponent Chick Knight on 31st August 1938, and then fellow Canadian Leo Lefebvre a few days later on 2nd September.[4][5] Prior to BBC Television Service ceasing transmissions on 1st September 1939 following the outbreak of the Second World War,[6] seven other matches would be shown, one match pitting Lefebvre against Bob Lengedin being broadcast as part of Seconds Out!.[7] The final match prior to BBC Television Service ceasing transmissions was between Harry Anaconda and Dave Armstrong, broadcast on 26th August 1939.[8]

Anaconda would later be involved in the first BBC televised match following the Second World War, facing Bert Assirati on 10th June 1946.[9] The BBC would broadcast a further 25 matches, the last of which featured Kid Pitman against Johnny Lipman on 28th June 1947.[10]

Availability

Like other early BBC television broadcasts, these professional wrestling matches were performed and broadcast live and were not recorded. Therefore, all matches broadcast during this time period are now permanently missing. The synopsis provided by Radio Times issues helped document the lost matches.

Gallery

External Link

References